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Flammability Characteristics of Combustible Gases and Vapors

Description: From Introduction: "The purpose of this bulletin is to present a general review of the subject of flammability, and to supply select experimental data and empirical rules on the flammability characteristics of various families of combustible gases and vapors in the air and other oxidizing atmospheres."
Date: unknown
Creator: Jensen, J. W. & Walsh, D. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Limits of Flammability of Gases and Vapors

Description: From Definitions: "This bulletin presents the results of a critical review of all figures published on the limits of flammability if combustible gases and vapors when admixed with air, oxygen,or other "atmosphere."
Date: 1952
Creator: Coward, H. F. & Jones, G. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chemical Action of Halogenated Agents in Fire Extinguishing

Description: From Summary: "The action of halogenated agents in preventing flame propagation in fuel-air mixtures in laboratory tests is discussed in terms of a possible chemical mechanism. The mechanism chosen is that of chain-breaking reactions between agent and active particles (hydrogen and oxygen atoms and hydroxyl radicsls). Data from the literature on the flammability peaks of n-heptane agent-air mixtures are treated. Ratings of agent effectiveness in terms of the fuel equivalent of the agent, based on both fuel and agent concentrations at the peak, are proposed as preferable to ratings in terms of agent concentration alone."
Date: September 1955
Creator: Belles, Frank E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reduction of Air Pollutants from Gas Burner Flames: Including Related Reaction Kinetics

Description: From Abstract: "The concentrations of air pollutants and the flame temperatures were measured, and the effects of ingress of secondary air into the primary and secondary combustion zones, flame stability, burner port surface, and simulated recycling of combustion gases were noted."
Date: unknown
Creator: Harris, Margaret E.; Rowe, Valeria R.; Cook, E. B. & Grumer, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spontaneous Flammability of Pentaborane and Pentaborane-3-Methylpentane Blends

Description: Memorandum presenting a study of the spontaneous flammability of pentaborane and pentaborane-3-methylpentane blends. The behavior of the substances in air and in liquid and vapor states was studied. Results regarding conditions under which pentaborane did not ignite and conditions under which pentaborane did ignite are provided.
Date: February 13, 1957
Creator: Fletcher, Edward A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Limits of Flammability of Pure Hydrocarbon-Air Mixtures at Reduced Pressures and Room Temperature

Description: Memorandum presenting a systematic study to determine the effect of molecular structure on the flammability limits of pure hydrocarbon-air mixtures at reduced pressures and room temperature. This report presents results obtained for 17 pure normal paraffins, branched paraffins, and mono-olefins. Results regarding experimental variables and experimental observations are provided.
Date: May 25, 1951
Creator: DiPiazza, James T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THE IMPACT OF OZONE ON THE LOWER FLAMMABLE LIMIT OF HYDROGEN IN VESSELS CONTAINING SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE

Description: The Savannah River Site, in conjunction with AREVA Federal services, has designed a process to treat dissolved radioactive waste solids with ozone. It is known that in this radioactive waste process, radionuclides radiolytically break down water into gaseous hydrogen and oxygen, which presents a well defined flammability hazard. Flammability limits have been established for both ozone and hydrogen separately; however, there is little information on mixtures of hydrogen and ozone. Therefore, testing was designed to provide critical flammability information necessary to support safety related considerations for the development of ozone treatment and potential scale-up to the commercial level. Since information was lacking on flammability issues at low levels of hydrogen and ozone, a testing program was developed to focus on filling this portion of the information gap. A 2-L vessel was used to conduct flammability tests at atmospheric pressure and temperature using a fuse wire ignition source at 1 percent ozone intervals spanning from no ozone to the Lower Flammable Limit (LFL) of ozone in the vessel, determined as 8.4%(v/v) ozone. An ozone generator and ozone detector were used to generate and measure the ozone concentration within the vessel in situ, since ozone decomposes rapidly on standing. The lower flammability limit of hydrogen in an ozone-oxygen mixture was found to decrease from the LFL of hydrogen in air, determined as 4.2 % (v/v) in this vessel. From the results of this testing, Savannah River was able to develop safety procedures and operating parameters to effectively minimize the formation of a flammable atmosphere.
Date: January 23, 2013
Creator: Sherburne, Carol; Osterberg, Paul; Johnson, Tom & Frawely, Thomas
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flammable gas tank waste level reconciliation for 241-SX-105

Description: Fluor Daniel Northwest was authorized to address flammable gas issues by reconciling the unexplained surface level increases in Tank 241-SX-105 (SX-105, typical). The trapped gas evaluation document states that Tank SX-105 exceeds the 25% of the lower flammable limit criterion, based on a surface level rise evaluation. The Waste Storage Tank Status and Leak Detection Criteria document, commonly referred to as the Welty Report is the basis for this letter report. The Welty Report is also a part of the trapped gas evaluation document criteria. The Welty Report contains various tank information, including: physical information, status, levels, and dry wells. The unexplained waste level rises were attributed to the production and retention of gas in the column of waste corresponding to the unaccounted for surface level rise. From 1973 through 1980, the Welty Report tracked Tank SX-105 transfers and reported a net cumulative change of 20.75 in. This surface level increase is from an unknown source or is unaccounted for. Duke Engineering and Services Hanford and Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation are interested in determining the validity of unexplained surface level changes reported in the Welty Report based upon other corroborative sources of data. The purpose of this letter report is to assemble detailed surface level and waste addition data from daily tank records, logbooks, and other corroborative data that indicate surface levels, and to reconcile the cumulative unaccounted for surface level changes as shown in the Welty Report from 1973 through 1980. Tank SX-105 initially received waste from REDOX starting the second quarter of 1955. After June 1975, the tank primarily received processed waste (slurry) from the 242-S Evaporator/Crystallizer and transferred supernate waste to Tanks S-102 and SX-102. The Welty Report shows a cumulative change of 20.75 in. from June 1973 through December 1980.
Date: June 23, 1997
Creator: Brevick, C.H. & Gaddie, L.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flammable gas program topical report

Description: The major emphasis of this report is to describe what has been learned about the generation, retention, and release of flammable gas mixtures in high-level waste tanks. A brief overview of efforts to characterize the gas composition will be provided. The report also discusses what needs to be learned about the phenomena, how the Unreviewed Safety Question will be closed, and the approach for removing tanks from the Watch List.
Date: October 30, 1996
Creator: Johnson, G.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FLAMMABLE GAS DIFFUSION THROUGH SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) DOMES

Description: This report quantified potential hydrogen diffusion through Hanford Site Single-Shell tank (SST) domes if the SSTs were hypothetically sealed airtight. Results showed that diffusion would keep headspace flammable gas concentrations below the lower flammability limit in the 241-AX and 241-SX SST. The purpose of this document is to quantify the amount of hydrogen that could diffuse through the domes of the SSTs if they were hypothetically sealed airtight. Diffusion is assumed to be the only mechanism available to reduce flammable gas concentrations. The scope of this report is limited to the 149 SSTs.
Date: November 10, 2003
Creator: MEACHAM, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calculation notes that support accident scenario and consequence of the in-tank fuel fire/deflagration

Description: The purpose of this calculation note is to provide the basis for In-Tank Fuel Fire/Deflageration consequence for the Tank Farm Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). Tank Fuel Fire/Deflageration scenario is developed and details and description of the analysis methods are provided.
Date: September 27, 1996
Creator: Crowe, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supporting documentation for requested exceptions to standing orders 96-36 (East) and 96-34 (West)

Description: On November 1, 1996 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) approved the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) (Wagoner 1996). The Tank Waste Remediation System issued (Hall 1996) two standing orders (96-36 East; and 96-34 West) to implement the requirements and authorization for continued operations included in the RL letter (Wagoner 199E). These standing orders included several requirements for the control of ignition sources (Appendix B, Section 7.0 ``Ignition Source Controls``) that include requirements for the design and operation of ``...equipment and materials used in the conduct of work...`` in Tank Farms. A verbatim compliance review of these ignition source controls identified several pieces of equipment and materials which have been used routinely in Tanks Farms for many years in support of safe operation that either could not: meet the equivalent design or safety provisions included in the standing orders (Hall 1996), or 21. be modified in a timely manner to meet safety and programmatic commitments. When the standing order was prepared it was anticipated that there would be a need to approve temporary exceptions. Appendix B, Section 7.0 of the standing order (Hall 1996) reads in part as follows: ``For activities where compliance will require modification to equipment or new materials, any temporary exceptions specifically allowed by RL until full compliance with the standing order is accomplished, are listed in Table 3.`` This document provides a specific listing of the items of equipment or material that could not meet the above two criteria. Also included in a table for each item is the following information: 1. the applicable control in the standing orders that could not be met, 2. under what conditions (when) the control could not be met, 3. a discussion of the applicability of the standing order, 4. a discussion of the risk ...
Date: January 16, 1997
Creator: Schofield, J.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flammable gas tank waste level reconciliation for 241-S-111

Description: Fluor Daniel Northwest (FDNW) was authorized to address flammable gas issues by reconciling the unexplained surface level increases in Tank 241-S-111. The trapped gas evaluation document states that Tank S-111 exceeds the 25% of the lower flammable-limit criterion, based on a surface level rise evaluation. The Waste Storage Tank Status and Leak Detection Criteria document, commonly referred to as the Welty Report is the basis for this letter report. The unexplained waste level rises were attributed to the production and retention of gas in the column of waste corresponding to the unaccounted for surface level rise. From 1973 through 1980, the Welty Report tracked Tank S-111 transfers. This surface level increase is from an unknown source or is unaccounted for. Duke Engineering and Services Hanford and Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation are interested in determining the validity of the unexplained surface level changes reported in the Welty Report based upon other corroborative sources of data. The purpose of this letter report is to assemble detailed surface level and waste addition data from daily tank records, logbooks, and other corroborative data that indicate surface levels, and to reconcile the cumulative unaccounted for surface level changes as shown in the Welty Report from 1973 through 1980. Tank S-111 initially received waste from REDOX in 1952, and after April 1974, primarily received processed waste slurry from the 242-S Evaporator/Crystallizer and transferred supernatant waste to Tank S-102. From the FDNW review and comparisons of the Welty Report versus other daily records for Tank S-111, FDNW determined that the majority of the time, the Welty Report is consistent with daily records. Surface level decreases that occurred following saltwell pumping were identified as unaccounted for decreases in the Welty Report, however they were probably a continued settlement caused by saltwell pumping of the interstitial liquids. Because the ...
Date: June 23, 1997
Creator: Brevick, C.H. & Gaddis, L.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flammable gas interlock spoolpiece flow response test plan and procedure

Description: The purpose of this test plan and procedure is to test the Whittaker electrochemical cell and the Sierra Monitor Corp. flammable gas monitors in a simulated field flow configuration. The sensors are used on the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) Flammable Gas Interlock (FGI), to detect flammable gases, including hydrogen and teminate the core sampling activity at a predetermined concentration level.
Date: February 13, 1997
Creator: Schneider, T.C., Fluor Daniel Hanford
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of high-level nuclear waste tanks having a potential flammable gas hazard

Description: In 1990 the U.S. Department of Energy declared an unreviewed safety question as a result of the behavior of tank 241-SY-101. This tank exhibited episodic releases of flammable gases that on a couple of occasions exceeded the lower flammability limit of hydrogen in air. Over the past six years a considerable amount of knowledge has been gained about the chemical and physical processes that govern the behavior of tank 241-SY-101 and the other tanks associated with a potential flammable gas hazard. This paper presents an overview of the current understanding of gas generation, retention, and release and covers the results of direct sampling of the tanks to determine the gas composition and the amount of stored gas.
Date: February 14, 1997
Creator: Johnson, G.D.; Barton, W.B.; Hill, R.C. & et al, Fluor Daniel Hanford
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lean flammability limit as a fundamental refrigerant property. Phase 1, Interim technical report, 1 October 1994--31 March 1995

Description: Due to the ozone-depleting effects of commonly used chlorofluorocarbon refrigerants, safe environmentally-friendly replacements must be found. HFC-32 (CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}) and other hydrochlorofluorocarbons are potential candidates; however, in contrast with the CFCs, many of these compounds are flammable. Testing the flammability limits of these hydrochlorofluorocarbons using traditional ASTM E-681 methods has produced a range of limits depending upon the vessel and ignition source used. This project demonstrates the feasibility of defining a fundamental flammability limit of HFC-32, that occurs at the limit of a zero strain rate and is independent of ignition source. Using a counterflow twin-flame burner to define extinction points for different strain rates, an extrapolation to zero strain rate is performed. Using this technique, preliminary results on the lean flammability limit of HFC-32 and the critical flammability ratio of HFC-125 (C{sub 2}HF{sub 5}) in ETC-32 are reported.
Date: March 31, 1995
Creator: Womeldorf, C.; King, M. & Grosshandler, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Hypothetical Burning-Velocity Formula for Very Lean Hydrogen-Air Mixtures

Description: Very lean hydrogen-air mixtures experience strong diffusive-thermal types of cellular instabilities that tend to increase the laminar burning velocity above the value that applies to steady, planar laminar flames that are homogeneous in transverse directions. Flame balls constitute an extreme limit of evolution of cellular flames. To account qualitatively for the ultimate effect of diffusive-thermal instability, a model is proposed in which the flame is a steadily propagating, planar, hexagonal, close-packed array of flame balls, each burning as if it were an isolated, stationary, ideal flame ball in an infinite, quiescent atmosphere. An expression for the laminar burning velocity is derived from this model, which theoretically may provide an upper limit for the experimental burning velocity.
Date: June 30, 2008
Creator: Williams, Forman; Williams, Forman A & Grcar, Joseph F
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACT OF TOA PARTITIONING ON DWPF MELTER OFF-GAS FLAMMABILITY

Description: An assessment has been made to evaluate the impact on the DWPF melter off-gas flammability of increasing the amount of TOA in the current solvent used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process Unit (MCU) process. The results of this study showed that the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon of the current solvent limit (150 ppm) in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product would be about 7% higher and the nonvolatile hydrogen would be 2% higher than the actual current solvent (126 ppm) with an addition of up to 3 ppm of TOA when the concentration of Isoparīƒ’ L in the effluent transfer is controlled below 87 ppm and the volume of MCU effluent transfer to DWPF is limited to 15,000 gallons per Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)/SME cycle. Therefore, the DWPF melter off-gas flammability assessment is conservative for up to an additional 3 ppm of TOA in the effluent based on these assumptions. This report documents the calculations performed to reach this conclusion.
Date: June 18, 2013
Creator: Daniel, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of the impact of the next generation solvent on DWPF melter off-gas flammability

Description: An assessment has been made to evaluate the impact on the DWPF melter off-gas flammability of replacing the current solvent used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process Unit (MCU) process with the Next Generation Solvent (NGS-MCU) and blended solvent. The results of this study showed that the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the current solvent in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product would both be about 29% higher than their counterparts of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent in the absence of guanidine partitioning. When 6 ppm of guanidine (TiDG) was added to the effluent transfer to DWPF to simulate partitioning for the NGS-MCU and blended solvent cases and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer was controlled below 87 ppm, the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent were still about 12% and 4% lower, respectively, than those of the current solvent. It is, therefore, concluded that as long as the volume of MCU effluent transfer to DWPF is limited to 15,000 gallons per Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)/SME cycle and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer is controlled below 87 ppm, using the current solvent assumption of 105 ppm Isopar{reg_sign} L or 150 ppm solvent in lieu of NGS-MCU or blended solvent in the DWPF melter off-gas flammability assessment is conservative for up to an additional 6 ppm of TiDG in the effluent due to guanidine partitioning. This report documents the calculations performed to reach this conclusion.
Date: February 13, 2013
Creator: Daniel, W. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Management of Leaks in Hydrogen Production, Delivery, and Storage Systems

Description: A systematic approach to manage hydrogen leakage from components is presented. Methods to evaluate the quantity of hydrogen leakage and permeation from a system are provided by calculation and testing sensitivities. The following technology components of a leak management program are described: (1) Methods to evaluate hydrogen gas loss through leaks; (2) Methods to calculate opening areas of crack like defects; (3) Permeation of hydrogen through metallic piping; (4) Code requirements for acceptable flammability limits; (5) Methods to detect flammable gas; (6) Requirements for adequate ventilation in the vicinity of the hydrogen system; (7) Methods to calculate dilution air requirements for flammable gas mixtures; and (8) Concepts for reduced leakage component selection and permeation barriers.
Date: April 27, 2006
Creator: Rawls, G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Milestone Report #2: Direct Evaporator Leak and Flammability Analysis Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat

Description: The direct evaporator is a simplified heat exchange system for an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) that generates electricity from a gas turbine exhaust stream. Typically, the heat of the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to the ORC by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. In this project, the goal is to design a direct evaporator where the working fluid is evaporated in the exhaust gas heat exchanger. By eliminating one of the heat exchangers and the intermediate oil loop, the overall ORC system cost can be reduced by approximately 15%. However, placing a heat exchanger operating with a flammable hydrocarbon working fluid directly in the hot exhaust gas stream presents potential safety risks. The purpose of the analyses presented in this report is to assess the flammability of the selected working fluid in the hot exhaust gas stream stemming from a potential leak in the evaporator. Ignition delay time for cyclopentane at temperatures and pressure corresponding to direct evaporator operation was obtained for several equivalence ratios. Results of a computational fluid dynamic analysis of a pinhole leak scenario are given.
Date: September 1, 2013
Creator: Guillen, Donna Post
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department