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Evaluation of flow capture techniques for measuring HVAC grilleairflows

Description: This paper discusses the accuracy of commercially available flow hoods for residential applications. Results of laboratory and field tests indicate these hoods can be inadequate to measure airflows in residential systems, and there can be large measurement discrepancies between different flow hoods. The errors are due to poor calibrations, sensitivity of the hoods to grille airflow non-uniformities, and flow changes from added flow resistance. It is possible to obtain reasonable results using some flow hoods if the field tests are carefully done, the grilles are appropriate, and grille location does not restrict flow hood placement. We also evaluated several simple flow capture techniques for measuring grille airflows that could be adopted by the HVAC industry and homeowners as simple diagnostics. These simple techniques can be as accurate as commercially available devices. Our test results also show that current calibration procedures for flow hoods do not account for field application problems. As a result, agencies such as ASHRAE or ASTM need to develop a new standard for flow hood calibration, along with a new measurement standard to address field use of flow capture techniques.
Date: November 1, 2002
Creator: Walker, Iain S. & Wray, Craig P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

POC-Scale Testing of Oil Agglomeration Techniques and Equipment for Fine Coal Processing

Description: The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a Proof-of-Concept (POC) scale oil agglomeration technology capable of increasing the recovery and improving the quality of fine coal strearrts. Two distinct agglomeration devices will be tested, namely, a conventional high shear mixer and a jet processor. To meet the overall objective an eleven task work plan has been designed. The work ranges from batch and continuous bench-scale testing through the design, commissioning and field testing of POC-scale agglomeration equipment.
Date: November 12, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quarterly Technical Progress Report - West Hackberry Tertiary Project

Description: The West Hackberry Tertiary Project is a field test of the concept that air injection can generate tertiary oil recovery through the Double Displacement Process is the gas displacement of a water invaded oil column for the purpose of recovering tertiary oil through gravity discharge. The novel aspect of this project is the use of air as the injection fluid.
Date: July 14, 1998
Creator: Yannimaras, Demetrios & Gillham, Travis
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quarterly Technical Progress Report - West Hackberry Tertiary Project

Description: The West Hackberry Tertiary Project is a field test of the concept that air injection can generate tertiary oil recovery through the Double Displacement Process is the gas displacement of a water invaded oil column for the purpose of recovering tertiary oil through gravity discharge. The novel aspect of this project is the use of air as the injection fluid.
Date: January 13, 1998
Creator: Cerveny, Bruce; Kragas, Tor & Gillham, Travis
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quarterly Technical Progress Report - West Hackberry Tertiary Project

Description: The West Hackberry Tertiary Project is a field test of the concept that air injection can generate tertiary oil recovery through the Double Displacement Process is the gas displacement of a water invaded oil column for the purpose of recovering tertiary oil through gravity discharge. The novel aspect of this project is the use of air as the injection fluid.
Date: April 15, 1998
Creator: Yannimaras, Demetrois & Gillham, Travis
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quarterly Technical Progress Report - West Hackberry Tertiary Project

Description: The West Hackberry Tertiary Project is a field test of the concept that air injection can generate tertiary oil recovery through the Double Displacement Process is the gas displacement of a water invaded oil column for the purpose of recovering tertiary oil through gravity discharge. The novel aspect of this project is the use of air as the injection fluid.
Date: July 10, 1997
Creator: Cerveny, Bruce; Kragas, Tor & Gillham, Travis
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Scale dependency of the effective matrix diffusion coefficient

Description: It has been recognized that matrix diffusion is an important process for retarding solute transport in fractured rock. Based on analyses of tracer transport data from a number of field tests, we demonstrate for the first time that the effective matrix-diffusion coefficient may be scale dependent and generally increases with test scale. A preliminary theoretical explanation of this scale dependency is also presented, based on the hypothesis that solute travel paths within a fracture network are fractals.
Date: May 30, 2003
Creator: Liu, H.H.; Bodvarsson, G.S. & Zhang, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Structural Health Monitoring Studies of the Alamosa Canyon and I-40 Bridges

Description: From 1994 to 1997 internal research grants from Los Alamos National Laboratory's Laboratory Direct Research and Development (LDRD) office were used to fund an effort aimed at studying global vibration-based damage detection methods. To support this work, several field tests of the Alamosa Canyon Bridge have been performed to study various aspects of applying vibration-based damage detection methods to a real world in situ structure. This report summarizes the data that has been collected from the various vibration tests performed on the Alamosa Canyon Bridge, analyses of these data, and the results that have been obtained. Initially, it was the investigators' intent to introduce various types of damage into this bridge and study several vibration-based damage detection methods. The feasibility of continuously monitoring such a structure for the onset of damage was also going to be studied. However, the restrictions that the damage must be relatively benign or repairable made it difficult to take the damage identification portion of the study to completion. Subsequently, this study focused on quantifying the variability in identified modal parameters caused by sources other than damage. These sources include variability in testing procedures, variability in test conditions, and environmental variability. These variabilities must be understood and their influence on identified modal properties quantified before vibration-based damage detection can be applied with unambiguous results. Quantifying the variability in the identified modal parameters led to the development of statistical analysis procedures that can be applied to the experimental modal analysis results. It is the authors' opinion that these statistical analysis procedures represent one of the major contributions of these studies to the vibration-based damage detection field. Another significant contribution that came from this portion of the study was the extension of a strain-energy-based damage detection method originally developed for structures that exhibit beam-bending response to structures that ...
Date: July 1, 2000
Creator: Farrar, Charles R.; Cornwell, Phillip J.; Doebling, Scott W. & Prime, Michael B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results

Description: California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak prices (CPP) to help reduce needle peaks in customer end-use loads. CPP is a form of price-responsive demand response (DR). Recent experience has shown that customers have limited knowledge of how to operate their facilities in order to reduce their electricity costs under CPP (Quantum 2004). While the lack of knowledge about how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs like CPP, another barrier is the lack of automation of DR systems. During 2003 and 2004, the PIER Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducted a series of tests of fully automated electric demand response (Auto-DR) at 18 facilities. Overall, the average of the site-specific average coincident demand reductions was 8% from a variety of building types and facilities. Many electricity customers have suggested that automation will help them institutionalize their electric demand savings and improve their overall response and DR repeatability. This report focuses on and discusses the specific results of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing (Auto-CPP, a specific type of Auto-DR) tests that took place during 2005, which build on the automated demand response (Auto-DR) research conducted through PIER and the DRRC in 2003 and 2004. The long-term goal of this project is to understand the technical opportunities of automating demand response and to remove technical and market impediments to large-scale implementation of automated demand response (Auto-DR) in buildings and industry. A second goal of this research is to understand and identify best practices for DR strategies and opportunities. The specific objectives of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing test were as follows: (1) Demonstrate how an automated notification system for critical peak pricing can be used in large commercial facilities for demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate effectiveness of such a system. ...
Date: April 6, 2006
Creator: Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila & Xu, Peng
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interfacial Reduction-Oxidation Mechanisms Governing Fate and Transport of Contaminants in the Vadose Zone

Description: Immobilization of toxic and radioactive metals (e.g., Cr, Tc, and U) in the vadose zone by in situ gaseous reduction using hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a promising technology the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing for soil remediation. Earlier laboratory studies have shown that Cr(VI) in a number of soil samples can be effectively immobilized by treatment with dilute gaseous H2S. A field test has also been completed that resulted in 70% immobilization of Cr(VI). The objective of this project is to characterize the interactions among H2S, the metal contaminants, and soil components. Understanding these interactions is needed to assess the long-term effectiveness of the technology and to optimize the remediation system.
Date: June 1, 2001
Creator: Deng, B.; Thornton, Edward C.; Olsen, Khris B.; Cantrell, Kirk J. & Amonette, James E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Marginal Expense Oil Well Wireless Surveillance (MEOWWS)

Description: The objective of this study was to identify and field test a new, low cost, wireless oil well surveillance system. A variety of suppliers and technologies were considered. One supplier and system was chosen that was low cost, new to the oil field, and successfully field tested.
Date: March 11, 2002
Creator: Nelson, Donald G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy Measurement in the Standard Penetration Test

Description: Report issued by the National Bureau of Standards over standard penetration testing. The history, limitations, and testing procedures are presented. This report includes tables, photographs, and illustrations.
Date: August 1981
Creator: Kovacs, William D.; Salomone, Lawrence A. & Yokel, Felix Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Load Displacement Characteristics of Shallow Soil Anchors

Description: Report issued by the National Bureau of Standards over studies conducted on load displacement of shallow soil anchors. Characteristics and testing methods are discussed. This report includes graphs, illustrations, and photographs.
Date: May 1982
Creator: Yokel, Felix Y.; Chung, Riley M.; Rankin, Frank A. & Yancey, Charles W. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Annual Technical Progress Report - West Hackberry Tertiary Project

Description: The West Hackberry Tertiary Project is a field test of the concept that air injection can be combined with the Double Displacement Process to produce a tertiary recovery process that is both low cost and economic at current oil prices. The Double Displacement Process is the gas displacement of a water invaded oil column for the purpose of recovering tertiary oil by gravity drainage. In reservoirs with pronounced bed dip such as those found in West Hackberry and other Gulf Coast salt dome fields, reservoir performance has shown that gravity drainage recoveries average 80% to 90% of the original oil in place while waterdrive recoveries average 50% to 60% of the original oil in place. The target for tertiary oil recovery in the Double Displacement Process is the incremental oil between the 50% to 60% waterdrive recoveries and the 80% to 90% gravity drainage recoveries. Air injection on the west flank began in November of 1994. Although west flank air injection has increased reservoir pressure by 500 pounds per square inch (psi), production response has not yet occurred. The gas cap on the west flank has not expanded sufficiently to push the oil rim down to the nearest downstructure well.
Date: September 30, 1997
Creator: Fornea, Allen; Cerveny, Bruce & Gillham, Travis H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of C02 Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Sprayberry Trend Area

Description: The objective is to assess the economic feasibility of CO2 flooding of the naturally fractured Straberry Trend Area in west Texas. Research is being conducted in the extensive characterization of the reservoirs, the experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interaction in the reservoirs, the analytical and numerical simulation of Spraberry reservoirs, and the experimental investigations on CO2 gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores.
Date: April 30, 1998
Creator: Schechter, David S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Valley-Fill Sandstones in the Kootenai Formation on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana

Description: Subsurface data continues to be collected, organized, and a digital database is being prepared for the project. An ACCESS database and PC-Arcview is being used to manage and interpret the data. Well data and base map data have been successfully imported into Arcview and customized to meet the needs of this project. Log tops and other data from about ¾ of the exploration wells in the area have been incorporated into the data base. All of the four 30� X 60� geologic quadrangles have been scanned to produce a digital surface geologic data base for the Crow Reservation and all are nearing completion. Formal technical review prior to publication has been completed for all the quadrangles; Billings, Bridger; Hardin, and Lodge Grass. Final GIS edits are being made before being forwarded to the Bureau�s Publications Department. Field investigations were completed during the third quarter, 1997. With the help of a student field assistant from the Crow Tribe, the entire project area was inventoried for the presence of valley-fill deposits in the Kootenai Formation. Field inventory has resulted in the identification of nine exposures of thick valley-fill deposits. These appear to represent at least four major westward-trending valley systems. All the channel localities have been measured and described in detail and paleocurrent data has been collected from all but one locality. In addition, two stratigraphic sections were measured in areas where channels are absent. One channel has bee traced over a distance of about 60 miles and exhibits definite paleostructural control. An abstract describing this channel has been submitted and accepted for presentation at the Williston Basin Symposium in October, 1998.
Date: July 3, 1998
Creator: Lopez, David A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Valey-Fill Sandstones in the Kootenai Formation on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana

Description: Subsurface data is being collected, organized, and a digital database is being prepared for the project. An ACCESS database and PC-Arcview is being used to manage and interpret the data. Well data and base map data have been successfully imported into Arcview and customized to meet the needs of this project. Log tops and other data from about ½ of the exploration wells in the area have been incorporated into the data base. All of the four 30� X 60� geologic quadrangles have been scanned to produce a digital surface geologic data base for the Crow Reservation and all are nearing completion. Formal technical review prior to publication has been completed for the Billings and Bridger Quadrangles; and are underway for the Hardin and Lodge Grass Quadrangles. Field investigations were completed during the last quarter. With the help of a student field assistant from the Crow Tribe, the entire project area was inventoried for the presence of valley-fill deposits in the Kootenai Formation. Field inventory has resulted in the identification of nine exposures of thick valley-fill deposits. These appear to represent at least four major westward-trending valley systems. All the channel localities have been measured and described in detail and paleocurrent data has been collected from all but one locality. In addition, two stratigraphic sections were measured in areas where channels are absent. One channel has bee traced over a distance of about 60 miles and exhibits definite paleostructural control. An abstract describing this channel has been submitted and accepted for presentation at the Williston Basin Symposium in October, 1998.
Date: April 7, 1998
Creator: Lopez, David A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Field Test Results of Automated Demand Response in a Large Office Building

Description: Demand response (DR) is an emerging research field and an effective tool that improves grid reliability and prevents the price of electricity from rising, especially in deregulated markets. This paper introduces the definition of DR and Automated Demand Response (Auto-DR). It describes the Auto-DR technology utilized at a commercial building in the summer of 2006 and the methodologies to evaluate associated demand savings. On the basis of field tests in a large office building, Auto-DR is proven to be a reliable and credible resource that ensures a stable and economical operation of the power grid.
Date: October 20, 2008
Creator: Han, Junqiao; Piette, Mary Ann & Kiliccote, Sila
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CX-100 and TX-100 blade field tests.

Description: In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. The blade aerodynamic and structural characterization, meteorological inflow and wind turbine structural response will be monitored with an array of 75 instruments: 33 to characterize the blades, 15 to characterize the inflow, and 27 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For both tests, data will be sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow.
Date: December 1, 2005
Creator: Holman, Adam (USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Bushland, TX); Jones, Perry L. & Zayas, Jose R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department