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Waste minimization applications at a remediation site

Description: The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) owned by the Department of Energy was used for the processing of uranium. In 1989 Fernald suspended production of uranium metals and was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL). The site`s mission has changed from one of production to environmental restoration. Many groups necessary for producing a product were deemed irrelevant for remediation work, including Waste Minimization. Waste Minimization does not readily appear to be applicable to remediation work. Environmental remediation is designed to correct adverse impacts to the environment from past operations and generates significant amounts of waste requiring management. The premise of pollution prevention is to avoid waste generation, thus remediation is in direct conflict with this premise. Although greater amounts of waste will be generated during environmental remediation, treatment capacities are not always available and disposal is becoming more difficult and costly. This creates the need for pollution prevention and waste minimization. Applying waste minimization principles at a remediation site is an enormous challenge. If the remediation site is also radiologically contaminated it is even a bigger challenge. Innovative techniques and ideas must be utilized to achieve reductions in the amount of waste that must be managed or dispositioned. At Fernald the waste minimization paradigm was shifted from focusing efforts on source reduction to focusing efforts on recycle/reuse by inverting the EPA waste management hierarchy. A fundamental difference at remediation sites is that source reduction has limited applicability to legacy wastes but can be applied successfully on secondary waste generation. The bulk of measurable waste reduction will be achieved by the recycle/reuse of primary wastes and by segregation and decontamination of secondary wastestreams. Each effort must be measured in terms of being economically and ecologically beneficial.
Date: January 23, 1995
Creator: Allmon, L.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Contract reform: It`s working at Fernald

Description: DOE`s contract reform initiatives at Fernald and the performance-based system DOE is now using to evaluate FERMCO are key elements to the current and future success of DOE and FERMCO at Fernald. Final cleanup of the Fernald site is planned for completion by 2005 per an accelerated 10-year remediation plan which has been approved by DOE and endorsed by the US EPA, Ohio EPA, and the Fernald Citizens Task Force. Required funding of approximately $276 million plus inflation annually for 10 years to accomplish final cleanup is now being considered by US Congress. Contract reform initiatives and modified performance measurement systems, along with best business practices, are clearing the path for the expedited cleanup of Fernald.
Date: January 25, 1996
Creator: Craig, J. & Hunt, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Status of decommissioning activities at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site

Description: The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) was formally closed and the mission of the facility was officially redirected toward environmental restoration in August 1991. Many of the production facilities and equipment still contained quantities of raw, intermediate, and finished production-related materials. The safe Shutdown program was initiated to remove and properly disposition all nuclear product and in process residue materials, supplies, chemicals, and associated process equipment that was abandoned in place when FEMP stopped production in 1989. As part of the remedial design of the interim remedial action, a schedule for building dismantlement was submitted in June 1995. A 31-year schedule was developed, based on anticipation of reduced funding levels. However, recent cleanup successes at Fernald led to DOE endorsement of greater funding for the final cleanup, accelerating the schedule for Operable Unit 3 dismantlement, reducing the schedule to ten years. Under the accelerated schedule, several plants will be dismantled, starting in 1996.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Screening and comparison of remedial alternatives for the South Field and flyash piles at the Fernald site

Description: The South Field, the Inactive Flyash Pile, and the Active Flyash Pile are in close proximity to each other and are part of Operable Unit 2 (OU2) at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). The baseline risk assessment indicated that the exposure pathways which pose the most significant risk are external radiation from radionuclides in surface soils and use of uranium contaminated groundwater. This paper presents screening and comparison of various remedial alternatives considered to mitigate risks from the groundwater pathway. Eight remedial alternatives were developed which consisted of consolidation and capping, excavation and off-site disposal with or without treatment, excavation and on-site disposal with or without treatment and combinations of these. Risk-based source (soil) preliminary remediation levels (PRLs) and waste acceptance criteria (WACs) were developed for consolidation and capping, excavation, and on-site disposal cell. The PRLs and WACs were developed using an integrated modeling tool consisting of an infiltration model, a surface water model, a vadose zone model, and a three-dimensional contaminant migration model in saturated media. The PRLs and WACs were then used to determine need for soil treatment, determine excavation volumes, and screen remedial alternatives. The selected remedial alternative consisted of excavation and on-site disposal with off-site disposal of the fraction exceeding the WAC.
Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: Bumb, A.C.; Jones, G.N. & Warner, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress of electro-hydraulic scabbling technology for concrete decontamination

Description: Concrete decontamination from organics, metals, and radionuclides requires removal of up to one inch of the surface layer. The Electro- Hydraulic Scabbling (EHS) technique has been developed within a 3- phase program. A prototype 8 kW EHS unit was designed and assembled in Phase II. This system was tested initially by scabbling noncontaminated concrete, and later at the DOE Fernald site where a concrete floor containing uranium was decontaminated. In the latter test, the unit operated without problems and reduced the counts per minute by more than 90%. Currently in Phase III, a larger 30 kW unit has been assembled and prepared for testing/demonstration.
Date: May 1, 1997
Creator: Goldfarb, V. & Gannon, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Large-scale decontamination and decommissioning technology demonstration project at a former uranium metal production facility

Description: The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Focus Area, led by the Federal Energy Technology Center, has been charged with improving upon baseline D&D technologies with the goal of demonstrating and validating more cost-effective and safer technologies to characterize, deactivate, survey, decontaminate, dismantle, and dispose of surplus structures, buildings, and their contents at DOE sites. The D&D Focus Area`s approach to verifying the benefits of the improved D&D technologies is to use them in large-scale technology demonstration (LSTD) projects at several DOE sites. The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) was selected to host one of the first three LSTD`s awarded by the D&D Focus Area. The FEMP is a DOE facility near Cincinnati, Ohio, that was formerly engaged in the production of high quality uranium metal. The FEMP is a Superfund site which has completed its RUFS process and is currently undergoing environmental restoration. With the FEMP`s selection to host an LSTD, the FEMP was immediately faced with some challenges. The primary challenge was that this LSTD was to be integrated into the FEMP`s Plant 1 D&D Project which was an ongoing D&D Project for which a firm fixed price contract had been issued to the D&D Contractor. Thus, interferences with the baseline D&D project could have significant financial implications. Other challenges include defining and selecting meaningful technology demonstrations, finding/selecting technology providers, and integrating the technology into the baseline D&D project. To date, twelve technologies have been selected, and six have been demonstrated. The technology demonstrations have yielded a high proportion of {open_quotes}winners.{close_quotes} All demonstrated, technologies will be evaluated for incorporation into the FEMP`s baseline D&D strategy.
Date: March 5, 1997
Creator: Martineit, R.A.; Borgman, T.D.; Peters, M.S. & Stebbins, L.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Case study: Evaluation of a scenario for the reuse of structures in the production area at Fernald

Description: The potential for the reuse of uncontaminated structures at federal facilities that are being remediated should be evaluated. Although various factors often limit the viability of such reuse, it may be economically attractive to reuse selected structures. Consideration of a hypothetical reuse scenario for the US Department of Energy`s Fernald, Ohio facility shows that the reuse of selected buildings that were not significantly contaminated by production activities at the site may be considerably less expensive than the construction of new ones. The cost of removal of existing buildings is a major factor influencing the relative advantages of these two options. For Fernald, no need for the facility`s buildings has been identified; however, the reuse of structures may be a viable option at other facilities.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Davis, M.J.; Folga, S.; Janke, R.J. & Kozlowski, D.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feed Materials Production Center. Final phase-in report volume 8 of 15 engineering and construction, October 25, 1985--December 31, 1985

Description: This transition task focused on a review of the engineering and construction activities at FMPC with the objectives of: (1) Understanding the current organization, its work load, its strengths and weaknesses, and its effectiveness in accomplishing its work. (2) Recommending improvements in organization, training, personnel and interfacing with the DOE. (3) Developing the procedures to be utilized in managing construction work to be carried out under the new Westinghouse/Rust contract that is to take effect upon take over by Westinghouse. This study included Line item Projects, General Plant Projects (GPP), Capital Projects, and Action Requests received by Project Engineering from Maintenance - both for design services and for procuring and following work by outside contractors on certain maintenance jobs. Other engineering services, provided primarily by the Production Technology Department, include direct support of production operations, customer liaison, resolution of product quality problems, and product development. These activities were not reviewed in detail during the transition due to the higher priority on improving Project Engineering performance. Waste Management Projects are reviewed separately in Section 11 of this report.
Date: January 17, 1986
Creator: Elikan, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radiological survey techniques for decontamination and dismantlement applications

Description: The Department of Energy`s Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is engaged in an aggressive Program to remove all above ground structures as part of the Fernald sites final remediation remedy. Through the complete removal of major facilities such as Plant 7, Plant 4, and Plant 1, the FEMP has developed radiological survey approaches that are effective for the different phases of the Decontamination and Dismantlement (D&D) process. Some of the most pressing challenges facing the FEMP are implementing effective, low cost methods for the D&D of former process buildings while minimizing environmental effects. One of the key components to ensure minimal impact on the environment is the collection of radiological contamination information during the D&D process to facilitate the decision making process. Prior to the final demolition of any structure, radiological surveys of floors, walls, and ceilings must take place. These surveys must demonstrate that contamination levels am below 5000 dpm removable beta/gamma for non-porous surfaces and below 1000 dpm removable-beta/gamma for all porous surfaces. Technique which can perform these activities in a safe, effective, and cost efficient manner are greatly desired. The FEMP has investigated new approaches to address this need. These techniques include sampling approaches using standard baseline methodology as well as innovative approaches to accelerate final radiological clearance processes. To further improve upon this process, the FEMP has investigated several new technologies through the Fernald Plant 1 Large Scale Technology Demonstration Project. One of the most promising of these new technologies, Laser Induced Fluorescence, may significantly improve the radiological clearance survey process. This paper will present real world experiences in applying radiological control limits to D&D projects as well as relate potential productivity and cost improvements with the implementation of new technologies.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Ruesink, G.P.; Stempfley, D.H.; Pettit, P.J. & Warner, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feed Materials Production Center. Final phase-in report volume 14 of 15 liaison with customers by FMPC (users) and DOE, October 25, 1985--December 31, 1985

Description: This document summarizes tasks related to concerns about how the FMPC relates to its customers and to DOE. This included identifying the key groups and personnel involved in such relationships, establishing policies and procedures regarding work done with DOE and regulatory agencies, review of the needs of users, including product delivery scheduling and quality control, defining critical administrative and technical areas which need to be addressed, and obtaining concurrance on the priorities to be attached to the efforts needed to address the above concerns.
Date: January 17, 1986
Creator: Weinreich, W.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feed Materials Production Center. Final phase-in report volume 9 of 15 management control system, October 25, 1985--December 31, 1985

Description: Well planned work is the key to success in managing a project or facility. Many large or small projects have management systems that are excellent in collecting history, such as monthly costs or shipments, while other systems produce spectacular plans for estimated costs and schedules. However, one of the tools for making management decisions is a control system that describes authorized work, schedules near term small increments of the work and identifies all resources that are needed to accomplish the work. That is the planning phase. Then, as the work is in process, the system periodically reports the status of the schedule and the cost. Then a comparison of plan to actual is analyzed and any significant variances are identified for management action, should it be required. The WMCO/DOE contract has included the requirement to implement a management control system known as Cost and Schedule Control System Criteria (C/SCSC), which is a system defined by DOE Orders. Thus, the intent of Task 9 of the WMCO Transition Plan was to study the management control system in place at FMPC and to prepare a plan that would enhance the system. The objective of the revised management control system would be to provide a usable management tool to measure accomplishments to plans and to identify Problem areas where management attention is needed. The system would also satisfy C/SCSC. This document presents the reports on the work tasks formulated to be part of the management system studies.
Date: January 17, 1986
Creator: North, C.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feed Materials Production Center. Final phase-in report Volume 3 of 15 community involvement, October 25, 1985--December 31, 1985

Description: This document addresses concerns related to public relations and community involvement and confidence in the operation of the FMPC facilities. The plan to address these issues is directed at four groups, neighbors, employees, environmental groups, and key community leaders. The plan addresses the following tasks: introduction to the community via press conferences; develop WMCO community involvement policy; meet with local support agencies to begin or continue cooperative agreements; meet key community leaders and discuss issues and their needs; establish a program for issuance of news releases on WMCO activities and determine proper channels and clearance procedures; establish interfaces between WMCO and Westinghouse corporate communications; review personnel assignment and interfaces with DOE; audit community relations practices to determine if cost efficiencies can be effected; review NLO community relations policies and programs with particular emphasis on coordination of response with DOE; create new position of manager of community involvement; review community involvement budget and projected budget needs; prepare community involvement program and submit to DOE.
Date: January 17, 1986
Creator: Woods, P.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feed Materials Production Center. Final phase-in report volume 15 of 15 nine month program plan, October 25, 1985--December 31, 1985

Description: The purpose of the nine month program plan is to document all the activities that are scheduled for January-September, 1986 at FMPC. The intent of preparing the nine month program plan was to prepare a description of authorized work, budget the work on a month-to-month basis and schedule the completion of work. The milestones in the WMCO Transition Plan that included the gathering of FY86 work scope and budget information in addition to issuing the 9-month Program Plan assumed the existence of an existing budget program that priced and budgeted work monthly. In the absence of a budget computer program, an IBM P.C, with extended memory was leased to handle the volume of budget data. The planning concept in the nine month program was based on defining manageable work, scheduling small increments of work, and estimating the resources in labor, material and services required to accomplish the work. Then, as the work plan is implemented, the accomplishments and actual costs are reported against the plan and significant variances are identified for management action, if required. The two work tasks which were scheduled in the Transition Plan for preparing the Nine Month Program Plan were: (1) collect FY86-88 financial data, production levels and capital construction schedules for FMPC, and (2) coordinate the preparation of the program plan consistent with C/SCSC where practical.
Date: January 17, 1986
Creator: North, C.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feed Materials Production Center. Final phase-in report volume 7 of 15 legal and contracts management, October 25, 1985--December 31, 1985

Description: The NLO Legal Department consisted of the Counsel, two Attorneys and one Staff level Legal Secretary. The Department responsibilities included all legal support of the FMPC and the subcontract coordination. In the planned reorganization of the NLO Procurement function, subcontract coordination will become the responsibility of Procurement and the legal support in that area will be decreased to consulting. The position of Counsel will be assumed by a Westinghouse Attorney as the incumbent is retiring. A Westinghouse Attorney has been assigned to WMCO on a temporary basis pending final identification of the Counsel. Final resolution of the NLO/WMCO litigation responsibility is pending further discussion. This document describes the tasks which fell into the legal area as part of the transition plan for management responsibility of the FMPC.
Date: January 17, 1986
Creator: Weddle, P.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1996 Site environmental report

Description: The FEMP is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the FEMP in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the FEMP. The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. This 1996 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the FEMP progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in this Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish are presented here. All information presented in this summary is discussed more fully in the main body of this report.
Date: June 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feed Materials Production Center. Final phase-in report volume 12 of 15, productivity retention program, October 25, 1985--December 31, 1985

Description: This transition task focused on a review of the Productivity & Radiological Improvements Line Item Program (Package 1) and the Productivity Retention Programs (Packages 2, 3 & 4). Specific objectives include: (1) Understanding the status of the programs. (2) Identifying critical path projects. (3) Identifying current and potential problems. (4) Reviewing the process and procedures employed by NLO for Line Item projects, covering the planning, estimating, justifying, approving, and acquisition and construction of facilities. (5) Preparing recommendations. Primary effort in this study was focused on Packages 1 and 2, since this is where current NLO activity is concentrated. This allowed the authors to proceed with a minimum of interruptions to on-going work effort. This report will cover findings and recommendations for all four subtasks which were defined to address the completion of the four packages.
Date: January 17, 1986
Creator: Elikan, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Westinghouse Materials Company (WMCO) of Ohio. Final report, October 25, 1985--December 31, 1985

Description: This document summarizes the second two weeks of the transition plan for Westinghouse Materials Company (WMCO) to transition into management of the Feed Materials Production Center. The report presents accomplishments, planned activities, and percieved problems for the process, organized into 15 general areas: operations and maintenance; human resources; community involvement; environmental, safety and health; security and safeguards; finance; legal and contracts management; engineering and construction; management control systems; quality assurance; waste management; productivity retention program; purchasing; liaison with customers of FMPC (Users) and DOE; development of 9-month program plan.
Date: December 4, 1985
Creator: Boswell, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feed Materials Production Center. Final phase-in report volume 1 of 15 operations and maintenance, October 25, 1985--December 31, 1985

Description: The basic purpose of the transition program in the operations area was to obtain a detailed understanding of the FMPC operations with emphasis on equipment and organization, Also considered in this evaluation were several extant conditions at FMPC which may have significant impact on initiatives adopted in the operations area. These conditions are as follows: capital expenditures over the last several years averaged less than 20% of what might be considered minimum to sustain such a facility in a good operating condition; the production load is ramping up placing greater demands on an old facility; the workforce is relatively inexperienced (68% with less than five (5) years) at FMPC; plans are in place to institute major upgrading of FMPC facilities; the RFP described the need for a major effort in the Environment, Safety and Health Area. Considering the above concerns, the transition program was focused in the following areas: Procedures - An inexperienced workforce operating in an atmosphere requiring rigid compliance with more rigorous environmental criteria necessitates clear, concise up-to-date procedures to enhance performance; Training - New equipment, new people and rigorous environmental constraints demand an aggressive, focused training program. Equipment - Site conditions are not conducive to reliable equipment performance. Specific knowledge of forecasted equipment performance is imperative to control the present and plan the future. Restoration - The massive planned expenditures must be well understood to ensure that the future production needs are satisfied and that priorities are aligned with need. Maintenance - Based on the site descriptions provided in the RFP, it was clear that the past maintenance practice has been reactive. The facility upgrade program, to be successful, must be complemented by an agressively managed maintenance program.
Date: January 17, 1986
Creator: Britton, W.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Westinghouse Materials Company (WMCO). Final report, October 25, 1985--December 31, 1985

Description: This document summarizes the first two weeks of the transition plan for Westinghouse Materials Company (WMCO) to transition into management of the Feed Materials Production Center. The report presents accomplishments, planned activities, and percieved problems for the process, organized into 15 general areas: operations and maintenance; human resources; community involvement; environmental, safety and health; security and safeguards; finance; legal and contracts management; engineering and construction; management control systems; quality assurance; waste management; productivity retention program; purchasing; liaison with customers of FMPC (Users) and DOE; development of 9-month program plan.
Date: November 19, 1985
Creator: Boswell, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and testing of the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) system for Fernald wastes. Phase 1, Final report

Description: This report presents results of a treatability study for the evaluation of the MAWS process for wastes stored at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site. Wastes included in the study were FEMP Pit 5 sludges, soil-wash fractions, and ion exchange media from a water treatment system supporting a soil washing system. MAWS offers potential for treating a variety of waste streams to produce a more leach resistant waste form at a lower cost than, say, cement stabilization.
Date: December 1, 1994
Creator: Fu, S.S.; Matlack, K.S.; Mohr, R.K.; Brandys, M. Hojaji, H.; Bennett, S.; Ruller, J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feed Materials Production Center. Final phase-in report volume 11 of 15 waste management, October 25, 1985--December 31, 1985

Description: This volume of the Transition Final Report provides the findings, recommendations and corrective actions for the Waste Management areas developed during the phase-in actions by Westinghouse Materials Company (WMCO). The objective is to provide a summary of the studies and investigations performed by the WMCO Company during the transition period. The Waste Management effort at FMPC was expanded in 1984 when a separate group was formed within the NLO organization. This is considered to be an area where significant increase in priority and effort must be applied to resolve waste management problems and to bring the site in conformity to regulations and the Environmental Health/Safety Standards. During the transition, there was a comprehensive investigation in all areas of air, liquid and solid waste management for nuclear, chemical and conventional wastes. Not all of these investigations are documented in this report, but the information gathered was used in the development of the budgets (cost accounts), programs, and organizational planning.
Date: January 17, 1986
Creator: Watts, R.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feed Materials Production Center. Final phase-in report volume 10 of 15 quality assurance, October 25, 1985--December 31, 1985

Description: Studies were conducted of the existing practices of quality assurance at the FMPC. Interviews with NLO personnel within the QA/QC Department and other interfacing organizations were held. Documents generated by the NLO QA/QC Department and operating manuals of various other NLO departments were examined to understand the current QA Program at the FMPC and to develop guidelines for a WMCO QA Program. In addition, Rust QA plans and current quality assurance practices between NLO and Rust Engineering were reviewed. The Kellogg Rust QA Program originates in the Oak Ridge K-R office with a manual of procedures that address the intent of the NQA-1 elements applicable to the activities of a construction organization. This Program will be submitted to WMCO for review as part of the WMCO/Kellogg Rust contract. The results of the NLO studies revealed that NLO organizations, including the QA/QC Department, have not been exposed to the NQA-1 quality concept; and consequently, the NLO organization is not staffed or structured to support the implementation and maintenance of an NQA-1 program. The principal functions of the NLO QA Department are to: (1) audit the NLO operating procedures and QA Plans, (2) collect and report chemical results of the FMPC products, and (3) inspect the final products, No formal procedures exist for the activities of the QA/QC Department or for the interactions of the Department with other departments in NLO.
Date: January 17, 1986
Creator: Grumski, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress report on decommissioning activities at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site

Description: The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), is located about 18 miles northwest of Cincinnati, Ohio. Between 1953 and 1989, the facility, then called the Feed Material Production Center or FMPC, produced uranium metal products used in the eventual production of weapons grade material for use by other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. In 1989, FMPC`s production was suspended by the federal government in order to focus resources on environmental restoration versus defense production. In 1992, Fluor Daniel Fernald assumed responsibility for managing all cleanup activities at the FEMP under contract to the DOE. In 1990, as part of the remediation effort, the site was divided into five operable units based on physical proximity of contaminated areas, similar amounts of types of contamination, or the potential for a similar technology to be used in cleanup activities. This report continues the outline of the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities at the FEMP site Operable Unit 3 (OU3) and provides an update on the status of the decommissioning activities. OU3, the Facilities Closure and Demolition Project, involves the remediation of more than 200 uranium processing facilities. The mission of the project is to remove nuclear materials stored in these buildings, then perform the clean out of the buildings and equipment, and decontaminate and dismantle the facilities.
Date: July 1, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization and remediation of soil prior to construction of an on-site disposal facility at Fernald

Description: During the production years at the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC), the soil of the site and the surrounding areas was surficially impacted by airborne contamination. The volume of impacted soil is estimated at 2.2 million cubic yards. During site remediation, this contamination will be excavated, characterized, and disposed of. In 1986 the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) entered into a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) covering environmental impacts associated with the FMPC. A site wide Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) was initiated pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (CERCLA). The DOE has completed the RI/FS process and has received approval of the final Records of Decision. The name of the facility was changed to the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) to emphasize the change in mission to environmental restoration. Remedial actions which address similar scopes of work or types of contaminated media have been grouped into remedial projects for the purpose of managing the remediation of the FEMP. The Soil Characterization and Excavation Project (SCEP) will address the remediation of FEMP soils, certain waste units, at- and below-grade material, and will certify attainment of the final remedial limits (FRLs) for the FEMP. The FEMP will be using an on-site facility for low level radioactive waste disposal. The facility will be an above-ground engineered structure constructed of geological material. The area designated for construction of the base of the on-site disposal facility (OSDF) is referred to as the footprint. Contaminated soil within the footprint must be identified and remediated. Excavation of Phase 1, the first of seven remediation areas, is complete.
Date: March 1, 1998
Creator: Hunt, A.; Jones, G.; Janke, R. & Nelson, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department