76 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

National Coastal Condition Report IV

Description: This report assesses the condition of the nation's estuaries and costal embayments, including the coastal waters of the conterminous United States, Southeastern Alaska, Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
Date: September 2012
Creator: United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Research and Development.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2012 Annual Report: Simulate and Evaluate the Cesium Transport and Accumulation in Fukushima-Area Rivers by the TODAM Code

Description: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory initiated the application of the time-varying, one-dimensional sediment-contaminant transport code, TODAM (Time-dependent, One-dimensional, Degradation, And Migration) to simulate the cesium migration and accumulation in the Ukedo River in Fukushima. This report describes the preliminary TODAM simulation results of the Ukedo River model from the location below the Ougaki Dam to the river mouth at the Pacific Ocean. The major findings of the 100-hour TODAM simulation of the preliminary Ukedo River modeling are summarized as follows:
Date: March 28, 2013
Creator: Onishi, Yasuo & Yokuda, Satoru T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Physical Hydraulic Models: Assessment of Predictive Capabilities; Report 1: Hydrodynamics of the Delaware River Estuary Model

Description: Partial abstract: The purpose of this study is to define the reliability with which results of tests conducted in a physical model of the Delaware River Estuary can be used to predict the effects of modifications to the estuary. The Delaware River model at the Waterways Experiment Station was used to conduct tests to predict the effects of the navigation channel enlargement between Philadelphia and Trenton, and the results of the tests are compared with subsequent prototype data to determine the accuracy of the model predictions.
Date: June 1975
Creator: Letter, Joseph V., Jr. & McAnally, William H., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Atlantic Coastal Experiment VI: R/V KNORR cruise, 23 August--11 September 1980, data report

Description: An investigation of the influence of estuaries on the ecosystem of the Mid-Atlantic Bight was undertaken. Data were collected from excursions into the Hudson, Delaware and Chesapeake estuaries, three across-shelf and one along-shelf transects, and two time series stations. In all, 139 stations were occupied and 164 XBT soundings were taken. In addition to standard hydrographic measurements, nutrient , chlorophyll, particulate carbon and nitrogen, 14C, 15N, DNA, particle size, FTD, phytoplankton and zooplankton analyses were made.
Date: January 1, 1983
Creator: Behrens, W. & von Bock, K. (eds)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Surface Currents and Winds at the Delaware Bay Mouth

Description: Knowledge of the circulation of estuaries and adjacent shelf waters has relied on hydrographic measurements, moorings, and local wind observations usually removed from the region of interest. Although these observations are certainly sufficient to identify major characteristics, they lack both spatial resolution and temporal coverage. High resolution synoptic observations are required to identify important coastal processes at smaller scales. Long observation periods are needed to properly sample low-frequency processes that may also be important. The introduction of high-frequency (HF) radar measurements and regional wind models for coastal studies is changing this situation. Here we analyze synoptic, high-resolution surface winds and currents in the Delaware Bay mouth over an eight-month period (October 2007 through May 2008). The surface currents were measured by two high-frequency radars while the surface winds were extracted from a data-assimilating regional wind model. To illustrate the utility of these monitoring tools we focus on two 45-day periods which previously were shown to present contrasting pictures of the circulation. One, the low-outflow period is from 1 October through 14 November 2007; the other is the high-outflow period from 3 March through 16 April 2008. The large-scale characteristics noted by previous workers are clearly corroborated. Specifically the M2 tide dominates the surface currents, and the Delaware Bay outflow plume is clearly evident in the low frequency currents. Several new aspects of the surface circulation were also identified. These include a map of the spatial variability of the M2 tide (validating an earlier model study), persistent low-frequency cross-mouth flow, and a rapid response of the surface currents to a changing wind field. However, strong wind episodes did not persist long enough to set up a sustained Ekman response.
Date: April 6, 2011
Creator: Muscarella, P A; Barton, N P; Lipphardt, B L; Veron, D E; Wong, K C & Kirwan, A D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The State of the Hudson 2009

Description: This report describes the environmental quality of the Hudson River and its watershed, including issues such as pollution, population growth, and biodiversity. The report also describes the habitats of estuaries, watersheds, and rivers in general.
Date: 2009
Creator: New York (State). Hudson River Estuary Program.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program

Description: The purpose ofthis document is to describe research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program. The intent of this RME effort is to provide data and information to evaluate progress toward meeting program goals and objectives and support decision-making in the Estuary Program. The goal of the Estuary Program is to understand, conserve, and restore the estuary ecosystem to improve the performance of listed salmonid populations. The Estuary Program has five general objectives, designed to fulfill the program goal, as follows. 1. Understand the primary stressors affecting ecosystem controlling factors, such as ocean conditions and invasive species. 2. Conserve and restore factors controlling ecosystem structures and processes, such as hydrodynamics and water quality. 3. Increase the quantity and quality of ecosystem structures, i.e., habitats, juvenile salmonids use during migration through the estuary. 4. Maintain the food web to benefit salmonid performance. 5. Improve salmonid performance in terms of life history diversity, foraging success, growth, and survival. The goal of estuary RME is to provide pertinent and timely research and monitoring information to planners, implementers, and managers of the Estuary Program. In conclusion, the estuary RME effort is designed to meet the research and monitoring needs of the estuary Program using an adaptive management process. Estuary RME's success and usefulness will depend on the actual conduct of adaptive management, as embodied in the objectives, implrementation, data, reporting, and synthesis, evaluation, and decision-making described herein.
Date: February 5, 2008
Creator: Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Tortorici, Cathy; Yerxa, Tracey; Leary, J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2007

Description: The goal of this multi-year study (2004-2010) is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River and estuary. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. Field research in 2005, 2006, and 2007 involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp vs. marsh), trajectory (restoration vs. reference site), and restoration action (tide gate vs. culvert vs. dike breach). The field work established two kinds of monitoring indicators for eventual cumulative effects analysis: core and higher-order indicators. Management implications of limitations and applications of site-specific effectiveness monitoring and cumulative effects analysis were identified.
Date: October 1, 2008
Creator: Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimation of the Risks of Collision or Strike to Freshwater Aquatic Organisms Resulting from Operation of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines

Description: Hydrokinetic energy technologies have been proposed as renewable, environmentally preferable alternatives to fossil fuels for generation of electricity. Hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of water in motion, either from waves, tides or from river currents. For energy capture from free-flowing rivers, arrays of rotating devices are most commonly proposed. The placement of hydrokinetic devices in large rivers is expected to increase the underwater structural complexity of river landscapes. Moore and Gregory (1988) found that structural complexity increased local fish populations because fish and other aquatic biota are attracted to structural complexity that provides microhabitats with steep flow velocity gradients (Liao 2007). However, hydrokinetic devices have mechanical parts, blades, wings or bars that move through the water column, posing a potential strike or collision risk to fish and other aquatic biota. Furthermore, in a setting with arrays of hydrokinetic turbines the cumulative effects of multiple encounters may increase the risk of strike. Submerged structures associated with a hydrokinetic (HK) project present a collision risk to aquatic organisms and diving birds (Cada et al. 2007). Collision is physical contact between a device or its pressure field and an organism that may result in an injury to that organism (Wilson et al. 2007). Collisions can occur between animals and fixed submerged structures, mooring equipment, horizontal or vertical axis turbine rotors, and structures that, by their individual design or in combination, may form traps. This report defines strike as a special case of collision where a moving part, such as a rotor blade of a HK turbine intercepts the path of an organism of interest, resulting in physical contact with the organism. The severity of a strike incidence may range from minor physical contact with no adverse effects to the organism to severe strike resulting in injury or death of the organism. Harmful effects ...
Date: May 2010
Creator: Schweizer, Peter E.; Cada, Glenn F. & Bevelhimer, Mark S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Niche of harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens revealed through ecogenomics

Description: Harmful algal blooms (HABs) cause significant economic and ecological damage worldwide. Despite considerable efforts, a comprehensive understanding of the factors that promote these blooms has been lacking, because the biochemical pathways that facilitate their dominance relative to other phytoplankton within specific environments have not been identified. Here, biogeochemical measurements showed that the harmful alga Aureococcus anophagefferens outcompeted co-occurring phytoplankton in estuaries with elevated levels of dissolved organic matter and turbidity and low levels of dissolved inorganic nitrogen. We subsequently sequenced the genome of A. anophagefferens and compared its gene complement with those of six competing phytoplankton species identified through metaproteomics. Using an ecogenomic approach, we specifically focused on gene sets that may facilitate dominance within the environmental conditions present during blooms. A. anophagefferens possesses a larger genome (56 Mbp) and has more genes involved in light harvesting, organic carbon and nitrogen use, and encoding selenium- and metal-requiring enzymes than competing phytoplankton. Genes for the synthesis of microbial deterrents likely permit the proliferation of this species, with reduced mortality losses during blooms. Collectively, these findings suggest that anthropogenic activities resulting in elevated levels of turbidity, organic matter, and metals have opened a niche within coastal ecosystems that ideally suits the unique genetic capacity of A. anophagefferens and thus, has facilitated the proliferation of this and potentially other HABs.
Date: February 18, 2011
Creator: Grigoriev, Igor; Gobler, Christopher; Salamov, Asaf; Kuo, Alan; Terry, Astrid; Pangillian, Jasmyn et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Salmon Life Histories, Habitat, and Food Webs in the Columbia River Estuary: An Overview of Research Results, 2002-2006.

Description: From 2002 through 2006 we investigated historical and contemporary variations in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha life histories, habitat associations, and food webs in the lower Columbia River estuary (mouth to rkm 101). At near-shore beach-seining sites in the estuary, Chinook salmon occurred during all months of the year, increasing in abundance from January through late spring or early summer and declining rapidly after July. Recently emerged fry dispersed throughout the estuary in early spring, and fry migrants were abundant in the estuary until April or May each year. Each spring, mean salmon size increased from the tidal freshwater zone to the estuary mouth; this trend may reflect estuarine growth and continued entry of smaller individuals from upriver. Most juvenile Chinook salmon in the mainstem estuary fed actively on adult insects and epibenthic amphipods Americorophium spp. Estimated growth rates of juvenile Chinook salmon derived from otolith analysis averaged 0.5 mm d-1, comparable to rates reported for juvenile salmon Oncorhynchus spp. in other Northwest estuaries. Estuarine salmon collections were composed of representatives from a diversity of evolutionarily significant units (ESUs) from the lower and upper Columbia Basin. Genetic stock groups in the estuary exhibited distinct seasonal and temporal abundance patterns, including a consistent peak in the Spring Creek Fall Chinook group in May, followed by a peak in the Western Cascades Fall Chinook group in July. The structure of acanthocephalan parasite assemblages in juvenile Chinook salmon from the tidal freshwater zone exhibited a consistent transition in June. This may have reflected changes in stock composition and associated habitat use and feeding histories. From March through July, subyearling Chinook salmon were among the most abundant species in all wetland habitat types (emergent, forested, and scrub/shrub) surveyed in the lower 100 km of the estuary. Salmon densities within wetland habitats fell to low ...
Date: August 1, 2008
Creator: Bottom, Daniel L.; Anderson, Greer & Baptisa, Antonio
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Distribution of excess temperature from the Morgantown Generating Station on the Potomac Estuary

Description: Research undertaken to determine the effects of thermal effluents on the temperature distribution in estuarine waters is described. Procedures for and results from measurements of the temperature, river flow, tidal currents, salinity, wind, etc at the Potomac River estuary in 1969 and 1972, which represent pre- and post-operation conditions for the operation of the fossil- fueled Morgantown power plant, are reported. (LC L)
Date: October 1, 1973
Creator: Carter, H.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Program ESTU: a method for estimating estuarine temperature distributions for Harleman's closed-form, one-dimensional model

Description: A method is presented for obtaining accurate numerical results for Harleman's closed-form, one-dimensional estuary model. The model applies to the case of a single-source input, steady net flow, and tidal flow varying sinusoidally with time. Though more sophisticated estuarine computational procedures are now available, this simple, closed-form model may continue to be useful for approximations and parameter surveys. Some general characteristics of temperature distributions as a function of time within the tidal cycle in the vicinity of a warm input are discussed for a typical East Coast estuary. Temperature profiles for 15-min intervals throughout the tidal cycle are plotted revealing some interesting and not well-known features. It is shown that a tidal average maximum temperature peak occurs very close to the location of the outfall for the range of net flows and dispersion coefficients that were examined. (auth)
Date: April 1, 1974
Creator: Wichner, R. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Selenium fractionation and cycling in the intertidal zone of the Carquinez Strait. Annual report, October 1, 1995--December 31,1996

Description: Selenium geochemistry in tidal wetlands is a topic of continuing study at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The program of studies described in this report was initiated in the fall of 1994 in response to concerns about elevated Se concentrations in waters, sediments, and biota in the Carquinez Strait. Processes by which selenium is introduced and potentially released from the sediment system have been the focus of research in 1996.
Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: Zawislanski, P.T.; McGrath, A.E. & Benson, S.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SCIENTIFIC VISUALIZATION AND DATA MODELING OF SCATTERED SEDIMENT CONTAMINANT DATA IN NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY ESTUARIES.

Description: Sediments in many parts of the New York and New Jersey estuary system are contaminated with toxic organic and inorganic compounds by different sources. Because of the potential environmental consequences, detailed information on the spatial distribution of sediment contaminants is essential in order to carry out routine shipping channel dredging in an environmentally responsible way, and to remediate hot spots cost-effectively and safely. Scientific visualization and scatter data modeling techniques have been successfully applied in analyzing the sparse sampling data of sediment contaminants in New York and New Jersey estuaries, the underlying spatial characteristics of which are otherwise difficult to comprehend. Continuous realizations of contaminant concentrations in the region were obtained by using a spectral domain-decomposition scattered data model and IBM Data Explorer which is a software package for scientific data visualization.
Date: October 23, 1998
Creator: MA,H.; JONES,K.W. & STERN,E.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SCIENTIFIC VISUALIZATION AND DATA MODELING OF SCATTERED SEDIMENT CONTAMINANT DATA IN NEW YORK/NEW JERSEY ESTUARIES

Description: Sediments in many parts of the New York and New Jersey estuary system are contaminated with toxic organic and inorganic compounds by different sources. Because of the potential environmental consequences, detailed information on the spatial distribution of sediment contaminants is essential in order to carry out routine shipping channel dredging in an environmentally responsible way, and to remediate hot spots cost-effectively and safely. Scientific visualization and scatter data modeling techniques have been successfully applied in analyzing the sparse sampling data of sediment contaminants in New York and New Jersey estuaries, the underlying spatial characteristics of which are otherwise difficult to comprehend. Continuous realizations of contaminant concentrations in the region were obtained by using a spectral domain-decomposition scattered data model and IBM Data Explorer which is a software package for scientific data visualization.
Date: October 23, 1998
Creator: MA,H.; JONES,K.W. & STERN,E.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plutonium in Atlantic coastal estuaries in the southeastern United States

Description: A survey was made to begin to provide baseline information on the Pu distribution of representative estuarine and coastal areas of the southeastern United States. Sediments and marsh grass (Spartina) were collected and analyzed from three locations within a tidal marsh. In three estuaries (Savannah, Neuse, and Newport), the suspended particulate matter (1 $mu$m and greater) was filtered from waters with different salinities, and the plutonium content of the particulates determined. The Savannah River estuary, in addition to fallout Pu, has received up to 0.3 Ci of Pu from the Savannah River Plant (SRP) of the U. S. Energy Research and Development Administration. The SRP plutonium has a variable isotopic composition that can influence Pu isotopic ratios in the estuarine system. The other estuaries do not have nuclear installations upstream. Data are included on the content of $sup 238$Pu, $sup 239$Pu, and $sup 240$Pu in sediments and marsh grass of the Savannah River estuary. (CH)
Date: January 1, 1975
Creator: Hayes, D. W.; LeRoy, J. H. & Cross, F. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department