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Manufacturing Ultra-Precision Meso-Scale Targets by Coining Summary Report

Description: There exists a certain type of high energy density physics experiment that requires a very precise, one or two-dimensional sinusoidal pattern to be imprinted on the surface of a thin disc-shaped specimen. Early discussions of potential fabrication processes included precision lapping using a substrate with the sinusoidal patterns, diamond turning, and various vapor deposition techniques. The process of coining, in which the sinusoidal pattern is pressed into the surface of a flat disc, was also proposed. Extensive discussions indicated that the low cost of coining and likelihood of success warranted this proof-of-principal investigation.
Date: July 27, 2004
Creator: Davis, P J; Wall, M A; Hodge, N E & Schwartz, A J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nanostructured energetic materials using sol-gel methodologies

Description: The fundamental differences between energetic composites and energetic materials made from a monomolecular approach are the energy density attainable and the energy release rates. For the past 4 years, we have been exploiting sol-gel chemistry as a route to process energetic materials on a microstructural scale. At the last ISA conference, we described four specific sol-gel approaches to fabricating energetic materials and presented our early work and results on two methods - solution crystallization and powder addition. Here, we detail our work on a third approach, energetic nanocomposites. Synthesis of thermitic types of energetic nanocomposites are presented using transition and main group metal-oxide skeletons. Results on characterization of structure and performance will also be given.
Date: September 27, 2000
Creator: Tillotson, T M; Simpson, R L; Hrubesh, L W; Gash, A E; Thomas, I M & Poco, J F
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High Energy Density Physics and Applications with a State-of-the-Art Compact X-Pinch

Description: Recent advances in technology has made possible to create matter with extremely high energy density (energy densities and pressure exceeding 1011 J/m3 and 1 Mbar respectively). The field is new and complex. The basic question for high energy density physics (HEDP) is how does matter behave under extreme conditions of temperature, pressure, density and electromagnetic radiation? The conditions for studying HEDP are normally produced using high intensity short pulse laser, x-rays, particle beams and pulsed power z-pinches. Most of these installations occupy a large laboratory floor space and require a team consisting of a large number of scientists and engineers. This limits the number of experiments that can be performed to explore and understand the complex physics. A novel way of studying HEDP is with a compact x-pinch in university scale laboratory. The x-pinch is a configuration in which a pulsed current is passed through two or more wires placed between the electrodes making the shape of the letter ‘X’. Extreme conditions of magnetic field (> 200 MGauss for less than 1 ns), temperature (1 keV) and density (~ 1022 cm-3) are produced at the cross-point, where two wires make contact. Further, supersonic jets are produced on either side of the cross-point. The physics of the formation of the plasma at the cross-point is complex. It is not clear what role radiation plays in the formation of high energy density plasma (>> 1011 J/m3) at the cross-point. Nor it is understood how the supersonic jets are formed. Present numerical codes do not contain complex physics that can take into account some of these aspects. Indeed, a comprehensive experimental study could answer some of the questions, which are relevant to wide-ranging fields such as inertial confinement fusion, astrophysical plasmas, high intensity laser plasma interactions and radiation physics. The main aim of ...
Date: August 14, 2013
Creator: Beg, Farhat N
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CENTER FOR PULSED POWER DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PLASMA STUDIES

Description: This annual report summarizes the activities of the Cornell Center for Pulsed-Power-Driven High-Energy-Density Plasma Studies, for the 12-month period October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006. This period corresponds to the first year of the two-year extension (awarded in October, 2005) to the original 3-year NNSA/DOE Cooperative Agreement with Cornell, DE-FC03-02NA00057. As such, the period covered in this report also corresponds to the fourth year of the (now) 5-year term of the Cooperative Agreement. The participants, in addition to Cornell University, include Imperial College, London (IC), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), the University of Rochester (UR), the Weizmann Institute of Science (WSI), and the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Moscow. A listing of all faculty, technical staff and students, both graduate and undergraduate, who participated in Center research activities during the year in question is given in Appendix A.
Date: April 18, 2007
Creator: Kusse, Professor Bruce R. & Hammer, Professor David A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Axions from cosmic string and wall decay

Description: If inflation occurred with a reheat temperature > T{sub PQ}, axions from the decay of global axion strings and domain walls would make an important contribution to the cosmological energy density, comparable to that from vacuum misalignment. Several groups have numerically studied the evolution of axion strings and walls in the past, however substantial uncertainties remain in their contribution to the present density {Omega}{sub a,string+wall} {approx} 1-100 (f{sub a}/10{sup 12} GeV){sup 7/6}, where f{sub a} is the axion decay constant. I will describe the numerical methods used in our simulations and show results for several string and wall configurations.
Date: March 10, 2010
Creator: Hagmann, C A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Static and Time-Resolved 10-1000 ke V X-Ray Imaging Detector Options for NIF

Description: High energy (> 10 keV) x-ray self-emission imaging and radiography will be essential components of many NIF High Energy Density Physics experiments. In preparation for such experiments, we have evaluated the pros and cons of various static (x-ray film, bare CCD, and scintillator + CCD) and time-resolved (streaked and gated) 10-1000 keV detectors.
Date: April 15, 2004
Creator: Landen, O; Bell, P; McDonald, J; Park, H; Weber, F; Moody, J et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Inflation in the postmodern era

Description: In this lecture I will review some recent progress in improving the accuracy of the calculation of density perturbations resulting from inflation. 26 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.
Date: December 1, 1996
Creator: Kolb, E.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NEW FORMS OF HIGH ENERGY DENSITY MATTER.

Description: In this talk, the author discusses the scientific issues being addressed in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. He also discusses some of the recent results from RHIC at Brookhaven National Laboratory which give some experimental insight into these issues.
Date: June 24, 2002
Creator: MCLERRAN,L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High Gradient Induction Cell

Description: A concept being developed for high current electron beams may have application to HEDP and is described here. It involves the use of planar Blumlein stacks placed inside an induction cell. The output end of the Blumlein stack is applied across a high gradient insulator (HGI). These insulators have been used successfully in the presence of kilo Ampere-level electron beam currents for tens of nanoseconds at gradients of 20 MV/meter.
Date: November 29, 2004
Creator: Caporaso, G J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Studies of laser-driven radiative blast waves

Description: We have performed two sets of experiments looking at laser-driven radiating blast waves. In one set of experiments the effect of a drive laser's passage through a background gas on the hydrodynamical evolution of blast waves was examined. It was found that the laser's passage heats a channel in the gas, creating a region where a portion of the blast wave front had an increased velocity, leading to the formation of a bump-like protrusion on the blast wave. The second set of experiments involved the use of regularly spaced wire arrays to induce perturbations on a blast wave surface. The decay of these perturbations as a function of time was measured for various wave number perturbations and found to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions.
Date: April 29, 2004
Creator: Edwards, M J; Hansen, J; Edens, A; Ditmire, T; Adams, R; Rambo, P et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of Proton Deflectometry for Exploding Wire Experiments

Description: This project provides the first demonstration of the application of proton deflectometry for the diagnosis of electromagnetic field topology and current-carrying regions in Z-pinch plasma experiments. Over the course of this project several milestones were achieved. High-energy proton beam generation was demonstrated on the short-pulse high-intensity Leopard laser, (10 Joules in ~350 femtoseconds, and the proton beam generation was shown to be reproducible. Next, protons were used to probe the electromagnetic field structure of short circuit loads in order to benchmark the two numerical codes, the resistive-magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) code, Gorgon, and the hybrid particle-in-cell code, LSP for the interpretation of results. Lastly, the proton deflectometry technique was used to map the magnetic field structure of pulsed-power-driven plasma loads including wires and supersonic jets formed with metallic foils. Good agreement between the modeling and experiments has been obtained. The demonstrated technique holds great promise to significantly improve the understanding of current flow and electromagnetic field topology in pulsed power driven high energy density plasmas. Proton probing with a high intensity laser was for the first time implemented in the presence of the harsh debris and x-ray producing z-pinch environment driven by a mega-ampere-scale pulsed-power machine. The intellectual merit of the program was that it investigated strongly driven MHD systems and the influence of magnetic field topology on plasma evolution in pulsed power driven plasmas. The experimental program involved intense field-matter interaction in the generation of the proton probe, as well as the generation of plasma subjected to 1 MegaGauss scale magnetic fields. The computational aspect included two well-documented codes, in combination for the first time to provide accurate interpretation of the experimental results. The broader impact included the support of 2 graduate students, one at UCSD and one at NTF, who were exposed to both the experimental physics work, the MHD ...
Date: September 25, 2013
Creator: Beg, Farhat Nadeem
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Continuation of the Application of Parallel PIC Simulations to Laser and Electron Transport Through Plasmas Under Conditions Relevant to ICF and SBSS

Description: One of the important research questions in high energy density science (HEDS) is how intense laser and electron beams penetrate into and interact with matter. At high beam intensities the self-fields of the laser and particle beams can fully ionize matter so that beam -matter interactions become beam-plasma interactions. These interactions involve a disparity of length and time scales, and they involve interactions between particles, between particles and waves, and between waves and waves. In a plasma what happens in one region can significantly impact another because the particles are free to move and many types of waves can be excited. Therefore, simulating these interactions requires tools that include wave particle interactions and that include wave nonlinearities. One methodology for studying such interactions is particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. While PIC codes include most of the relevant physics they are also the most computer intensive. However, with the development of sophisticated software and the use of massively parallel computers, PIC codes can now be used to accurately study a wide range of problems in HEDS. The research in this project involved building, maintaining, and using the UCLA parallel computing infrastructure. This infrastructure includes the codes OSIRIS and UPIC which have been improved or developed during this grant period. Specifically, we used this PIC infrastructure to study laser-plasma interactions relevant to future NIF experiments and high-intensity laser and beam plasma interactions relevant to fast ignition fusion. The research has led to fundamental knowledge in how to write parallel PIC codes and use parallel PIC simulations, as well as increased the fundamental knowledge of HEDS. This fundamental knowledge will not only impact Inertial Confinement Fusion but other fields such as plasma-based acceleration and astrophysics.
Date: April 20, 2007
Creator: Mori, Warren B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Macron Formed Liner Compression as a Practical Method for Enabling Magneto-Inertial Fusion

Description: The entry of fusion as a viable, competitive source of power has been stymied by the challenge of finding an economical way to provide for the confinement and heating of the plasma fuel. The main impediment for current nuclear fusion concepts is the complexity and large mass associated with the confinement systems. To take advantage of the smaller scale, higher density regime of magnetic fusion, an efficient method for achieving the compressional heating required to reach fusion gain conditions must be found. The very compact, high energy density plasmoid commonly referred to as a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) provides for an ideal target for this purpose. To make fusion with the FRC practical, an efficient method for repetitively compressing the FRC to fusion gain conditions is required. A novel approach to be explored in this endeavor is to remotely launch a converging array of small macro-particles (macrons) that merge and form a more massive liner inside the reactor which then radially compresses and heats the FRC plasmoid to fusion conditions. The closed magnetic field in the target FRC plasmoid suppresses the thermal transport to the confining liner significantly lowering the imploding power needed to compress the target. With the momentum flux being delivered by an assemblage of low mass, but high velocity macrons, many of the difficulties encountered with the liner implosion power technology are eliminated. The undertaking to be described in this proposal is to evaluate the feasibility achieving fusion conditions from this simple and low cost approach to fusion. During phase I the design and testing of the key components for the creation of the macron formed liner have been successfully carried out. Detailed numerical calculations of the merging, formation and radial implosion of the Macron Formed Liner (MFL) were also performed. The phase II effort will focus ...
Date: December 10, 2011
Creator: Slough, John
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling and Simulation of Fluid Mixing Laser Experiments and Supernova; Reporting Period 5/1/06-4/30/07

Description: The three year plan for this project is to develop novel theories and advanced simulation methods leading to a systematic understanding of turbulent mixing. A primary focus is the comparison of simulation models (both Direct Numerical Simulation and subgrid averaged models) to experiments. The comprehension and reduction of experimental and simulation data are central goals of this proposal. We will model 2D and 3D perturbations of planar interfaces. We will compare these tests with models derived from averaged equations (our own and those of others). As a second focus, we will develop physics based subgrid simulation models of diffusion across an interface, with physical but no numerical mass diffusion. We will conduct analytic studies of mix, in support of these objectives. Advanced issues, including multiple layers and reshock, will be considered.
Date: May 23, 2007
Creator: Glimm, James
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling and Simulation of Fluid Mixing Laser Experiments and Supernova

Description: The three year plan for this project is to develop novel theories and advanced simulation methods leading to a systematic understanding of turbulent mixing. A primary focus is the comparison of simulation models (both Direct Numerical Simulation and subgrid averaged models) to experiments. The comprehension and reduction of experimental and simulation data are central goals of this proposal. We will model 2D and 3D perturbations of planar interfaces. We will compare these tests with models derived from averaged equations (our own and those of others). As a second focus, we will develop physics based subgrid simulation models of diffusion across an interface, with physical but no numerical mass diffusion. We will conduct analytic studies of mix, in support of these objectives. Advanced issues, including multiple layers and reshock, will be considered.
Date: June 24, 2008
Creator: Glimm, James
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling and Simulation of Fluid Mixing Laser Experiments and Supernova

Description: The three year plan for this project was to develop novel theories and advanced simulation methods leading to a systematic understanding of turbulent mixing. A primary focus is the comparison of simulation models (Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS), Large Eddy Simulations (LES), full two fluid simulations and subgrid averaged models) to experiments. The comprehension and reduction of experimental and simulation data are central goals of this proposal. We model 2D and 3D perturbations of planar or circular interfaces. We compare these tests with models derived from averaged equations (our own and those of others). As a second focus, we develop physics based subgrid simulation models of diffusion across an interface, with physical but no numerical mass diffusion. Multiple layers and reshock are considered here.
Date: June 4, 2009
Creator: Glimm, James
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics

Description: High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.
Date: August 26, 2013
Creator: Chen, Chiping
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department