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Cost-Benefit Analysis and Financial Regulator Rulemaking

Description: This report examines issues related to financial regulators and cost-benefit analysis' (CBA), including potential difficulties facing such regulators and methods available to them when preforming a CBA, the analytical requirements the agencies currently face, and the arguments for and against increasing requirements on financial regulators. This report also briefly describes several examples of proposed legislation that would change the requirements facing financial regulators.
Date: April 12, 2017
Creator: Perkins, David W. & Carey, Maeve P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Methods of Estimating the Total Cost of Federal Regulations

Description: This report analyzes these two approaches for estimating the total cost of federal regulations. In discussing each approach, the report provides an overview of the advantages, a brief case study, and an analysis of the potential issues or inherent problems using the case study to illustrate the concepts.
Date: January 21, 2016
Creator: Carey, Maeve P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Regional Economic Impact of Texas Motor Speedway: A Simulation

Description: This study proposes a method for measuring the regional economic impact of a relatively new sport: stock car racing. Although research on the economic impact of most major league sports is abundant, little has been written on stock car racing. The purpose of this paper is to estimate, through a simulation, the regional economic impact of Texas Motor Speedway. The study finds that the Texas Motor Speedway boosted economic activity by $87,179,367 in 1998 from racetrack operations, and supported 5,300 jobs paying $22,293,135 in earnings. In addition, expenditures by speedway visitor from outside the region are estimated at $22,985,200, further increasing the total local economic activity by $49 million.
Date: August 2000
Creator: Rattner, Laura E.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Public health and economic impact of dampness and mold

Description: The public health risk and economic impact of dampness and mold exposures was assessed using current asthma as a health endpoint. Individual risk of current asthma from exposure to dampness and mold in homes from Fisk et al. (2007), and asthma risks calculated from additional studies that reported the prevalence of dampness and mold in homes were used to estimate the proportion of U.S. current asthma cases that are attributable to dampness and mold exposure at 21% (95% confidence internal 12-29%). An examination of the literature covering dampness and mold in schools, offices, and institutional buildings, which is summarized in the appendix, suggests that risks from exposure in these buildings are similar to risks from exposures in homes. Of the 21.8 million people reported to have asthma in the U.S., approximately 4.6 (2.7-6.3) million cases are estimated to be attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home. Estimates of the national cost of asthma from two prior studies were updated to 2004 and used to estimate the economic impact of dampness and mold exposures. By applying the attributable fraction to the updated national annual cost of asthma, the national annual cost of asthma that is attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home is estimated to be $3.5 billion ($2.1-4.8 billion). Analysis indicates that exposure to dampness and mold in buildings poses significant public health and economic risks in the U.S. These findings are compatible with public policies and programs that help control moisture and mold in buildings.
Date: June 1, 2007
Creator: Mudarri, David & Fisk, William J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The economic impact of Sandia National Laboratories on central New Mexico and the State of New Mexico, Fiscal year 1995

Description: Central NM: funding was about $1.5 billion in FY95, yielding a total economic impact of $4.3 billion, about 10.5% of total economic activity in the region. Total personal income impact was over $1.1 billion in FY95, nearly 9% of personal income in the 4 counties. The employment multipler 3.90 means that the 8,118 average employment level resulted in a total impact of 31,643, and in effect, nearly one of every 10 jobs was created or supported by SNL. State of New Mexico: The $1.5 billion funding supported a total economic impact of $4.4 billion, about 5% of total economic activity. Total personal income imapcts were nearly $1.15 billion or nearly 4% of personal income in the state. The employment multipler of 3.97 for the state meant that the 8,153 average employment level supported a total impact of 32,339; thus, in effect, one of every 23 jobs in the state was created or supported by SNL. About 75% of the jobs created indirectly by SNL in the central region and in the state occurred in the trade, services, and finance/insurance/real estate sectors.
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Lansford, R.R.; Adcock, L.D.; Gentry, L.M. & Ben-David, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic Impact of Hospitals: the Case of Baylor Regional Medical Center at Grapevine.

Description: This report analyzes the economic impacts of the Baylor Regional Medical Center at Grapevine, Texas. The economic impacts are analyzed using the IMPLAN impact modeling system developed by the Minnesota IMPLAN Group. The analysis evaluates construction activities by Baylor-Grapevine as well as procurement spending and employment. Additionally, the impact of ancillary facilities surrounding Baylor-Grapevine and the impact of patient visitor spending is also reviewed. Total recurring impacts of procurement spending at Baylor-Grapevine, employment at Baylor-Grapevine and its ancillary facilities, and visitor spending will generate over $227 million in economic activity for the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. This activity will support more than 3,300 direct, indirect, and induced jobs paying over $138 million in annual earnings.
Date: August 2004
Creator: Graves, Jennifer M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Meeting Summary, Economic Development Panel, Business Meeting No.31

Description: OAK-B135 The objectives of the meeting were as follows: (1) Learn more about and discuss economic impacts of wind power development in the U.S, highlighting the NWCC report, ''Assessing the Economic Impacts of Wind Power Development''; (2) Learn more about and discuss wind integration costs and the impacts of recent studies on wind energy development; and (3) Review activities and products planned for FY 2004.
Date: June 18, 2003
Creator: Bryan, Kevin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Impact of the FY 2009 Building Technologies Program on United States Employment and Earned Income

Description: The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is interested in assessing the potential economic impacts of its portfolio of subprograms on national employment and income. A special purpose input-output model called ImSET is used in this study of 14 Building Technologies Program subprograms in the EERE final FY 2009 budget request to the Office of Management and Budget in February 2008. Energy savings, investments, and impacts on U.S. national employment and earned income are reported by subprogram for selected years to the year 2025. Energy savings and investments from these subprograms have the potential of creating a total of 258,000 jobs and about $3.7 billion in earned income (2007$) by the year 2025.
Date: June 17, 2008
Creator: Livingston, Olga V.; Scott, Michael J.; Hostick, Donna J.; Dirks, James A. & Cort, Katherine A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic impact

Description: In federal fiscal year 2000 (FY00), Berkeley Lab had 4,347 full- and part-time employees. In addition, at any given time of the year, there were more than 1,000 Laboratory guests. These guests, who also reside locally, have an important economic impact on the nine-county Bay Area. However, Berkeley Lab's total economic impact transcends the direct effects of payroll and purchasing. The direct dollars paid to the Lab's employees in the form of wages, salaries, and benefits, and payments made to contractors for goods and services, are respent by employees and contractors again and again in the local and greater economy. Further, while Berkeley Lab has a strong reputation for basic scientific research, many of the Lab's scientific discoveries and inventions have had direct application in industry, spawning new businesses and creating new opportunities for existing firms. This analysis updates the Economic Impact Analysis done in 1996, and its purpose is to describe the economic and geographic impact of Laboratory expenditures and to provide a qualitative understanding of how Berkeley Lab impacts and supports the local community. It is intended as a guide for state, local, and national policy makers as well as local community members. Unless otherwise noted, this analysis uses data from FY00, the most recent year for which full data are available.
Date: June 1, 2001
Creator: Department, Technology Transfer
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado (Fact Sheet)

Description: This report analyzes the potential economic impacts in Colorado and Wyoming of a 225 MW natural gas fired electricity generation facility and a 900 MW wind farm constructed in Wyoming as well as a 180 mile, 345 kV transmission line that runs from Wyoming to Colorado. This report and analysis is not a forecast, but rather an estimate of economic activity associated with a hypothetical scenario.
Date: March 1, 2013
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado

Description: This report analyzes the potential economic impacts in Colorado and Wyoming of a 225 MW natural gas fired electricity generation facility and a 900 MW wind farm constructed in Wyoming as well as a 180 mile, 345 kV transmission line that runs from Wyoming to Colorado. This report and analysis is not a forecast, but rather an estimate of economic activity associated with a hypothetical scenario.
Date: March 1, 2013
Creator: Keyser, D. & Lantz, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LIGHTING CONTROLS: SURVEY OF MARKET POTENTIAL

Description: This study describes the impact of lighting management systems that dynamically control lights in accordance with the needs of occupants. Various control strategies are described: scheduling, tuning, lumen depreciation, and daylighting. From initial experimental results, the energy savings provided by each of the above strategies are estimated to be 26, 12, 14, and 15%, respectively. Based upon a cost of $0.05-0.10 per kWh for electric energy and a 2-, 3-, or 4-yr payback, target costs for a simple and a sophisticated lighting management system are found to be $0.24 and 1.89 per ft{sup 2}, respectively, for a cost-effective investment. A growth model, based upon an extrapolation of the increase in building stock since 1975, indicates that the commercial and industrial (C and I) building stock will grow from 40 x 10{sup 9} ft{sup 2} in 1980 to about 67 x 10{sup 9} ft{sup 2} by the year 2000. Even with the use of more efficient lighting components, the energy required for this additional C and I stock will be 307 x 10{sup 9} kWh, an increase of only 13 x 10{sup 9} kWh above current use. The specified information is used to analyze the economic impacts that using these systems will have on the lighting industry, end users, utility companies, and the nation's economy. A $1 - 4 x 10{sup 9} annual lighting control industry can be generated, creating many jobs. The estimated return on investment (ROI) for controls for end users would be between 19 and 38%. Utilities will be able to make smaller additions to capacity and invest less capital at 7-10% ROI. Finally, the annual energy savings, up to $3.4 x 10{sup 9} for end users and about $5 x 10{sup 9} for utilities, representing unneeded generating capacity, will be available to capitalize other areas of the ...
Date: September 1, 1982
Creator: Verderber, R.R. & Rubinstein, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling National Impacts for the Building America Program

Description: In this paper we present a model to estimate the nationalenergy and economic impacts of the Department of Energy Building Americaprogram. The program goal is to improve energy performance in newresidential construction, by working with builders to design andconstruct energy-efficient homes at minimal cost. The model is anadaptation of the method used to calculate the national energy savingsfor appliance energy efficiency standards. The main difference is thatthe key decision here is not the consumer decision to buy anefficienthouse, but rather the builder decision to offer such a house inthe market. The builder decision is treated by developing a number ofscenarios in which the relative importance of first costs vs. energysavings is varied.
Date: June 15, 2006
Creator: Coughlin, Katie M. & McNeil, Michael A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Climate uncertainty and implications for U.S. state-level risk assessment through 2050.

Description: Decisions for climate policy will need to take place in advance of climate science resolving all relevant uncertainties. Further, if the concern of policy is to reduce risk, then the best-estimate of climate change impacts may not be so important as the currently understood uncertainty associated with realizable conditions having high consequence. This study focuses on one of the most uncertain aspects of future climate change - precipitation - to understand the implications of uncertainty on risk and the near-term justification for interventions to mitigate the course of climate change. We show that the mean risk of damage to the economy from climate change, at the national level, is on the order of one trillion dollars over the next 40 years, with employment impacts of nearly 7 million labor-years. At a 1% exceedance-probability, the impact is over twice the mean-risk value. Impacts at the level of individual U.S. states are then typically in the multiple tens of billions dollar range with employment losses exceeding hundreds of thousands of labor-years. We used results of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report 4 (AR4) climate-model ensemble as the referent for climate uncertainty over the next 40 years, mapped the simulated weather hydrologically to the county level for determining the physical consequence to economic activity at the state level, and then performed a detailed, seventy-industry, analysis of economic impact among the interacting lower-48 states. We determined industry GDP and employment impacts at the state level, as well as interstate population migration, effect on personal income, and the consequences for the U.S. trade balance.
Date: October 1, 2009
Creator: Loose, Verne W.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Stamber, Kevin Louis; Kelic, Andjelka et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Benefit/Cost Analysis of Geothermal Technology R&D. Volume II: Geothermal Drilling Technology

Description: This report describes benefit/cost analyses of 24 research and development (R and D) projects of the Geothermal Drilling Technology Program of the Utilization Technology Branch (UTB) of the Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE). The analyses are focused on the economic impacts that these projects might have on the cost of electric power produced at 27 hydrothermal prospects in the US between 1978 and 2000.
Date: May 1, 1979
Creator: Entingh, Daniel J. & Lopez, Al
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Open Source Stochastic Building Simulation Tool SLBM and Its Capabilities to Capture Uncertainty of Policymaking in the U.S. Building Sector

Description: The increasing concern about climate change as well as the expected direct environmental economic impacts of global warming will put considerable constraints on the US building sector, which consumes roughly 48percent of the total primary energy, making it the biggest single source of CO2 emissions. It is obvious that the battle against climate change can only be won by considering innovative building approaches and consumer behaviors and bringing new, effective low carbon technologies to the building / consumer market. However, the limited time given to mitigate climate change is unforgiving to misled research and / or policy. This is the reason why Lawrence Berkeley National Lab is working on an open source long range Stochastic Lite Building Module (SLBM) to estimate the impact of different policies and consumer behavior on the market penetration of low carbon building technologies. SLBM is designed to be a fast running, user-friendly model that analysts can readily run and modify in its entirety through a visual interface. The tool is fundamentally an engineering-economic model with technology adoption decisions based on cost and energy performance characteristics of competing technologies. It also incorporates consumer preferences and passive building systems as well as interactions between technologies (such as internal heat gains). Furthermore, everything is based on service demand, e.g. a certain temperature or luminous intensity, instead of energy intensities. The core objectives of this paper are to demonstrate the practical approach used, to start a discussion process between relevant stakeholders and to build collaborations.
Date: May 14, 2009
Creator: Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Azevedo, Ines Lima; Komiyama, Ryoichi & Lai, Judy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic Development Impacts from Wind Power in the Western Governors' Association States (Poster)

Description: The Western Governors' Association created the Clean and Diversified Energy Advisory Committee (CDEAC) "to utilize the region's diverse resources to produce affordable, sustainable, and environmentally reponsible energy." This conference poster, prepared for WINDPOWER 2007 in Los Angeles, outlines the economic impact to the Western United States from new wind energy projects.
Date: June 1, 2007
Creator: Tegen, S.; Goldberg, M. & Milligan, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

How to Estimate the Value of Service Reliability Improvements

Description: A robust methodology for estimating the value of service reliability improvements is presented. Although econometric models for estimating value of service (interruption costs) have been established and widely accepted, analysts often resort to applying relatively crude interruption cost estimation techniques in assessing the economic impacts of transmission and distribution investments. This paper first shows how the use of these techniques can substantially impact the estimated value of service improvements. A simple yet robust methodology that does not rely heavily on simplifying assumptions is presented. When a smart grid investment is proposed, reliability improvement is one of the most frequently cited benefits. Using the best methodology for estimating the value of this benefit is imperative. By providing directions on how to implement this methodology, this paper sends a practical, usable message to the industry.
Date: June 8, 2010
Creator: Sullivan, Michael J.; Mercurio, Matthew G.; Schellenberg, Josh A. & Eto, Joseph H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CIM-EARTH: Community integrated model of economic and resource trajectories for humankind.

Description: Climate change is a global problem with local climatic and economic impacts. Mitigation policies can be applied on large geographic scales, such as a carbon cap-and-trade program for the entire U.S., on medium geographic scales, such as the NOx program for the northeastern U.S., or on smaller scales, such as statewide renewable portfolio standards and local gasoline taxes. To enable study of the environmental benefits, transition costs, capitalization effects, and other consequences of mitigation policies, we are developing dynamic general equilibrium models capable of incorporating important climate impacts. This report describes the economic framework we have developed and the current Community Integrated Model of Economic and Resource Trajectories for Humankind (CIM-EARTH) instance.
Date: January 1, 2010
Creator: Elliott, J.; Foster, I.; Judd, K.; Moyer, E.; Munson, T.; Chicago, Univ. of et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995

Description: This Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1995 (1 July 1994 through 30 June 1995). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. Economic data were requested from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.
Date: December 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The economic impact of Los Alamos National Laboratory on North-Central New Mexico and the state of New Mexico. Fiscal Year 1995

Description: Los Alamos National Laboratory is a multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratory with a mission to enhance national military and economic security through science and technology. Its mission is to reduce the nuclear danger through stewardship of the nation`s nuclear stockpile and through its nonproliferation and verification activities. An important secondary mission is to promote U.S. industrial competitiveness by working with U.S. companies in technology transfer and technology development partnerships. Los Alamos has provided technical assistance to over 70 small New Mexico businesses enabling economic development activities in the region and state.
Date: August 1996
Creator: Lansford, R. R.; Adcock, L. D.; Gentry, L. M. & Ben-David, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The role of science and technology for energy and the environment

Description: The premise of this paper is that science, and the technology derived from science, is not the answer to energy and environmental problems. Science is a method of answering questions and as modern societies people must be very careful and specific in posing those questions. Many of the environmental issues addressed at the meeting are the direct result of not being specific enough in the demands placed on the science community. For example, when science was asked to increase chemical production to produce greater and greater quantities of consumer products, society forgot to ask that they be produced without significant damage to the environment. When society developed nuclear deterrents to protect national security interests, it failed to consider the life-cycle costs of these weapons systems. Now society must deal with a legacy of hundreds of billions of dollars in clean-up costs. One impediment has been that energy and environmental problems are intrinsically crosscutting, both across scientific disciplines and the decision-making systems of society. The author suggests that one approach to this problem is better integration across scientific disciplines and the integration of science and technology with political, economic and social factors. Three examples of successes are used to illustrate this.
Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: Hjersen, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The economic impact of Los Alamos National Laboratory on north-central New Mexico and the state of New Mexico fiscal year 1997

Description: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratory with a mission to enhance national military and economic security through science and technology. Its mission is to reduce the nuclear danger through stewardship of the nation`s nuclear stockpile and through its nonproliferation and verification activities. An important secondary mission is to promote US industrial competitiveness by working with US companies in technology transfer and technology development partnerships. Los Alamos is involved in partnerships and collaborations with other federal agencies, with industry (including New Mexico businesses), and with universities worldwide. For this report, the reference period is FY 1997 (October 1, 1996, through September 30, 1997) and includes two major impact analysis: the impact of LANL activities on north-central New Mexico and the economic impacts of LANL on the state of New Mexico. Total impact represents both direct and indirect respending by business, including induced effects (respending by households). The standard multipliers used in determining impacts result from the inter-industry, input-output models developed for the three-county region and the state of New Mexico. 5 figs., 12 tabs.
Date: May 29, 1998
Creator: Lansford, R.R.; Nielsen, T.G.; Schultz, J.; Adcock, L.D.; Gentry, L.M.; Ben-David, S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department