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Methods of Estimating the Total Cost of Federal Regulations

Description: This report analyzes these two approaches for estimating the total cost of federal regulations. In discussing each approach, the report provides an overview of the advantages, a brief case study, and an analysis of the potential issues or inherent problems using the case study to illustrate the concepts.
Date: January 21, 2016
Creator: Carey, Maeve P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Regional Economic Impact of Texas Motor Speedway: A Simulation

Description: This study proposes a method for measuring the regional economic impact of a relatively new sport: stock car racing. Although research on the economic impact of most major league sports is abundant, little has been written on stock car racing. The purpose of this paper is to estimate, through a simulation, the regional economic impact of Texas Motor Speedway. The study finds that the Texas Motor Speedway boosted economic activity by $87,179,367 in 1998 from racetrack operations, and supported 5,300 jobs paying $22,293,135 in earnings. In addition, expenditures by speedway visitor from outside the region are estimated at $22,985,200, further increasing the total local economic activity by $49 million.
Date: August 2000
Creator: Rattner, Laura E.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Economic Impact of Hospitals: the Case of Baylor Regional Medical Center at Grapevine.

Description: This report analyzes the economic impacts of the Baylor Regional Medical Center at Grapevine, Texas. The economic impacts are analyzed using the IMPLAN impact modeling system developed by the Minnesota IMPLAN Group. The analysis evaluates construction activities by Baylor-Grapevine as well as procurement spending and employment. Additionally, the impact of ancillary facilities surrounding Baylor-Grapevine and the impact of patient visitor spending is also reviewed. Total recurring impacts of procurement spending at Baylor-Grapevine, employment at Baylor-Grapevine and its ancillary facilities, and visitor spending will generate over $227 million in economic activity for the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex. This activity will support more than 3,300 direct, indirect, and induced jobs paying over $138 million in annual earnings.
Date: August 2004
Creator: Graves, Jennifer M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Meeting Summary, Economic Development Panel, Business Meeting No.31

Description: OAK-B135 The objectives of the meeting were as follows: (1) Learn more about and discuss economic impacts of wind power development in the U.S, highlighting the NWCC report, ''Assessing the Economic Impacts of Wind Power Development''; (2) Learn more about and discuss wind integration costs and the impacts of recent studies on wind energy development; and (3) Review activities and products planned for FY 2004.
Date: June 18, 2003
Creator: Bryan, Kevin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The economic impact of Sandia National Laboratories on central New Mexico and the State of New Mexico, Fiscal year 1995

Description: Central NM: funding was about $1.5 billion in FY95, yielding a total economic impact of $4.3 billion, about 10.5% of total economic activity in the region. Total personal income impact was over $1.1 billion in FY95, nearly 9% of personal income in the 4 counties. The employment multipler 3.90 means that the 8,118 average employment level resulted in a total impact of 31,643, and in effect, nearly one of every 10 jobs was created or supported by SNL. State of New Mexico: The $1.5 billion funding supported a total economic impact of $4.4 billion, about 5% of total economic activity. Total personal income imapcts were nearly $1.15 billion or nearly 4% of personal income in the state. The employment multipler of 3.97 for the state meant that the 8,153 average employment level supported a total impact of 32,339; thus, in effect, one of every 23 jobs in the state was created or supported by SNL. About 75% of the jobs created indirectly by SNL in the central region and in the state occurred in the trade, services, and finance/insurance/real estate sectors.
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Lansford, R.R.; Adcock, L.D.; Gentry, L.M. & Ben-David, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Public health and economic impact of dampness and mold

Description: The public health risk and economic impact of dampness and mold exposures was assessed using current asthma as a health endpoint. Individual risk of current asthma from exposure to dampness and mold in homes from Fisk et al. (2007), and asthma risks calculated from additional studies that reported the prevalence of dampness and mold in homes were used to estimate the proportion of U.S. current asthma cases that are attributable to dampness and mold exposure at 21% (95% confidence internal 12-29%). An examination of the literature covering dampness and mold in schools, offices, and institutional buildings, which is summarized in the appendix, suggests that risks from exposure in these buildings are similar to risks from exposures in homes. Of the 21.8 million people reported to have asthma in the U.S., approximately 4.6 (2.7-6.3) million cases are estimated to be attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home. Estimates of the national cost of asthma from two prior studies were updated to 2004 and used to estimate the economic impact of dampness and mold exposures. By applying the attributable fraction to the updated national annual cost of asthma, the national annual cost of asthma that is attributable to dampness and mold exposure in the home is estimated to be $3.5 billion ($2.1-4.8 billion). Analysis indicates that exposure to dampness and mold in buildings poses significant public health and economic risks in the U.S. These findings are compatible with public policies and programs that help control moisture and mold in buildings.
Date: June 1, 2007
Creator: Mudarri, David & Fisk, William J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic impact

Description: In federal fiscal year 2000 (FY00), Berkeley Lab had 4,347 full- and part-time employees. In addition, at any given time of the year, there were more than 1,000 Laboratory guests. These guests, who also reside locally, have an important economic impact on the nine-county Bay Area. However, Berkeley Lab's total economic impact transcends the direct effects of payroll and purchasing. The direct dollars paid to the Lab's employees in the form of wages, salaries, and benefits, and payments made to contractors for goods and services, are respent by employees and contractors again and again in the local and greater economy. Further, while Berkeley Lab has a strong reputation for basic scientific research, many of the Lab's scientific discoveries and inventions have had direct application in industry, spawning new businesses and creating new opportunities for existing firms. This analysis updates the Economic Impact Analysis done in 1996, and its purpose is to describe the economic and geographic impact of Laboratory expenditures and to provide a qualitative understanding of how Berkeley Lab impacts and supports the local community. It is intended as a guide for state, local, and national policy makers as well as local community members. Unless otherwise noted, this analysis uses data from FY00, the most recent year for which full data are available.
Date: June 1, 2001
Creator: Department, Technology Transfer
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Impact of the FY 2009 Building Technologies Program on United States Employment and Earned Income

Description: The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is interested in assessing the potential economic impacts of its portfolio of subprograms on national employment and income. A special purpose input-output model called ImSET is used in this study of 14 Building Technologies Program subprograms in the EERE final FY 2009 budget request to the Office of Management and Budget in February 2008. Energy savings, investments, and impacts on U.S. national employment and earned income are reported by subprogram for selected years to the year 2025. Energy savings and investments from these subprograms have the potential of creating a total of 258,000 jobs and about $3.7 billion in earned income (2007$) by the year 2025.
Date: June 17, 2008
Creator: Livingston, Olga V.; Scott, Michael J.; Hostick, Donna J.; Dirks, James A. & Cort, Katherine A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado (Fact Sheet)

Description: This report analyzes the potential economic impacts in Colorado and Wyoming of a 225 MW natural gas fired electricity generation facility and a 900 MW wind farm constructed in Wyoming as well as a 180 mile, 345 kV transmission line that runs from Wyoming to Colorado. This report and analysis is not a forecast, but rather an estimate of economic activity associated with a hypothetical scenario.
Date: March 1, 2013
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado

Description: This report analyzes the potential economic impacts in Colorado and Wyoming of a 225 MW natural gas fired electricity generation facility and a 900 MW wind farm constructed in Wyoming as well as a 180 mile, 345 kV transmission line that runs from Wyoming to Colorado. This report and analysis is not a forecast, but rather an estimate of economic activity associated with a hypothetical scenario.
Date: March 1, 2013
Creator: Keyser, D. & Lantz, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic impacts of the United States of siting decisions for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor: Executive summary

Description: This summary highlights the results of a study that examined and compared the probable short-term economic impacts of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) on the United States (U.S.) if (1) ITER were to be sited in the U.S. or (2) ITER were to be sited in one of the other countries that, along with the U.S., are currently participating in the ITER program. Life-cycle costs associated with ITER construction, operation, and decommissioning were analyzed to assess their economic impact. A number of possible U.S. {open_quotes}host{close_quotes} and U.S. {open_quotes}non-host{close_quotes} technology and cost-sharing arrangements were examined. The study examined both national and local/regional economic impacts, as measured by gross domestic product (GDP), regional output, employment, income, and net exports. These impacts represent a portion of the complex, interrelated set of economic considerations that characterize U.S. host and U.S. non-host participation in ITER.
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Peerenboom, J.P.; Hanson, M.E.; Huddleston, J.R. & Wolsko, T.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic impacts on the United States of siting decisions for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor

Description: This report presents the results of a study that examines and compares the probable short-term economic impacts of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) on the United States (U.S.) if (1) ITER were to be sited in the U.S., or (2) ITER were to be sited in one of the other countries that, along with the U.S., is currently participating in the ITER program. Life-cycle costs associated with ITER construction, operation, and decommissioning are analyzed to assess their economic impact. A number of possible U.S. host and U.S. non-host technology and cost-sharing arrangements with the other ITER Parties are examined, although cost-sharing arrangements and the process by which the Parties will select a host country and an ITER site remain open issues. Both national and local/regional economic impacts, as measured by gross domestic product, regional output, employment, net exports, and income, are considered. These impacts represent a portion of the complex, interrelated set of economic considerations that characterize U.S. host and U.S. non-host participation in ITER. A number of other potentially important economic and noneconomic considerations are discussed qualitatively.
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Peerenboom, J.P.; Hanson, M.E. & Huddleston, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995

Description: This Colorado economic impact study summarizes employment and economic benefits to the state from activities associated with the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project during Colorado state fiscal year (FY) 1995 (1 July 1994 through 30 June 1995). To capture employment information, a questionnaire was distributed to subcontractor employees at the active UMTRA Project sites of Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock, Colorado. Economic data were requested from the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE). The most significant benefits associated with the UMTRA Project in Colorado are summarized.
Date: December 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic impact study of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action project in Colorado: Colorado state fiscal year 1995. Revision 1

Description: As required by the Romer-Twining Agreement of 1990, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this annual economic impact study for the state of Colorado. This report assesses the economic impacts related to the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in Colorado during the state fiscal year (FY) between 1 July 1994 and 30 June 1995. To estimate net economic benefit, employment, salaries and wages, and other related economic benefits are discussed, quantified, and then compared to the state`s 10 percent share of the remedial action costs. Actual data obtained from sites currently undergoing remedial action were used as the basis for analyses. If data were not available, estimates were used to derive economic indicators. This study describes the types of employment associated with the UMTRA Project and estimates of the numbers of people employed by UMTRA Project subcontractors in Colorado during state FY 1995. Employment totals are reported in estimated average annual jobs; however, the actual number of workers at the site fluctuates depending on weather and on the status of remedial action activities. In addition, the actual number of people employed on the Project during the year may be higher than the average annual employment reported due to the temporary nature of some of the jobs.
Date: December 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Risk-based priority scoring for Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental restoration programs

Description: This report describes the process of estimating the risk associated with environmental restoration programs under the Brookhaven National Laboratory Office of Environmental Restoration. The process was part of an effort across all Department of Energy facilities to provide a consistent framework to communicate risk information about the facilities to senior managers in the DOE Office of Environmental Management to foster understanding of risk activities across programs. the risk evaluation was a qualitative exercise. Categories considered included: Public health and safety; site personnel safety and health; compliance; mission impact; cost-effective risk management; environmental protection; inherent worker risk; environmental effects of clean-up; and social, cultural, political, and economic impacts.
Date: May 1, 1995
Creator: Morris, S.C. & Meinhold, A.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic and education impact of building the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility

Description: The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) was built in Newport News, Virginia, between 1987 and 1995 and is a new basic research laboratory christened the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). Jefferson Lab's science and technology mission has major economic and educational benefits: basic research discoveries, improvement and application of key technologies associated with the accelerator and the experiments, extensive subcontracting with industry, and diverse employment and educational opportunities. The $600 million invested by federal, state, local and international partners to build Jefferson Lab has had substantial economic and educational benefits locally, as well as significant benefits distributed among industries and universities throughout the United States.
Date: January 1, 1996
Creator: Hartline, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Valuation of ecological resources

Description: Ecological resources are resources that have functional value to ecosystems. Frequently, these functions are overlooked in terms of the value they provide to humans. Environmental economics is in search of an appropriate analysis framework for such resources. In such a framework, it is essential to distinguish between two related subsets of information: (1) ecological processes that have intrinsic value to natural ecosystems; and (2) ecological functions that are values by humans. The present study addresses these concerns by identifying a habitat that is being displaced by development, and by measuring the human and ecological values associated with the ecological resources in that habitat. It is also essential to determine which functions are mutually exclusive and which are, in effect, complementary or products of joint production. The authors apply several resource valuation tools, including contingent valuation methodology (CVM), travel cost methodology (TCM), and hedonic damage-pricing (HDP). One way to derive upper-limit values for more difficult-to-value functions is through the use of human analogs, because human-engineered systems are relatively inefficient at supplying the desired services when compared with natural systems. Where data on the relative efficiencies of natural systems and human analogs exist, it is possible to adjust the costs of providing the human analog by the relative efficiency of the natural system to obtain a more realistic value of the function under consideration. The authors demonstrate this approach in an environmental economic case study of the environmental services rendered by shrub-steppe habitats of Benton County, Washington State.
Date: April 1, 1995
Creator: Scott, M.J.; Bilyard, G.R.; Link, S.O.; Ricci, P.F.; Seely, H.E.; Ulibarri, C.A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Methodology, capabilities, and an example: Employment impacts of the Climate Change Action Plan

Description: A software package, Sectoral Energy/Employment Analysis and Data System (SEADS-PC), that can translate policy changes into employment and energy impacts is described. The core data for this tool include input-output (I/O) tables for 1977, 1982, 1987, and 2005 in 1982 dollars, and I/O tables for 1987 and 1990 in 1987 dollars. For each of the I/O tables there are corresponding final demand vectors and employment intensities. For a but the 2005 table there are energy intensities as well. The final demands and the intensities can be changed to reflect alternative policies. A final demand vector that reflects a specific policy, for example, can be created, based on an existing final demand vector. This vector can then be premultiplied by the appropriate I/O table to yield industry output, which in turn can be multiplied by energy or employment intensities to yield employment or energy resulting from the policy scenario. These policy results can then be compared with a base case and the differences reported. The report is in four sections. The first section is an introduction. The second section provides the accounting framework for the tool and describes the data provided. The third section serves as a user`s guide to the software, describing the functionality of the program and what results can be expected. The fourth section uses the President`s Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP) as an example policy for which employment impacts can be calculated. The results of the CCAP exercise suggest that this program will result in about 60,000 new jobs (about 115 million additional hours of work) for the year 2000. In the year 2000, the CCAP final demands are greater than the base case final demands by $192.8 million (1990 dollars). The additional jobs are created as a result of both the shifts among final demand categories ...
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Roop, J.M.; Anderson, D.M. & Schultz, R.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Regional manufacturing technology development for the small manufacturer. CRADA final report

Description: The purpose of this CRADA was to provide a mechanism whereby private sector companies within the State of Florida could access the vast technological resources available at the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee and Largo, Florida. This assistance was focused on assisting companies within the region to become more globally competitive. The State of Florida Department of Commerce, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) Specialty Components and LMES Oak Ridge, provided companies with up to four days of technical assistance at no charge. As a result of those interactions, there has been an economic impact of $13.7 million dollars reported, and 138 jobs retained or created over the life of the CRADA. Although this has not been the most successful of all the technical assistance CRADAs, it has proven, because of the number of assistances, to be very successful.
Date: September 30, 1996
Creator: Shanks, B.A. & Patz, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A manual for the economic evaluation of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies

Description: This manual is a guide for analyzing the economics of energy efficiency and renewable energy (EE) technologies and projects. It is intended (1) to help analysts determine the appropriate approach or type of analysis and the appropriate level of detail and (2) to assist EE analysts in completing consistent analyses using standard assumptions and bases, when appropriate. Included are analytical techniques that are commonly required for the economic analysis of EE technologies and projects. The manual consists of six sections: Introduction, Fundamentals, Selection Criteria Guide, Economic Measures, Special Considerations for Conservation and Renewable Energy Systems, and References. A glossary and eight appendices are also included. Each section has a brief introductory statement, a presentation of necessary formulae, a discussion, and when appropriate, examples and descriptions of data and data availability. The objective of an economic analysis is to provide the information needed to make a judgment or a decision. The most complete analysis of an investment in a technology or a project requires the analysis of each year of the life of the investment, taking into account relevant direct costs, indirect and overhead costs, taxes, and returns on investment, plus any externalities, such as environmental impacts, that are relevant to the decision to be made. However, it is important to consider the purpose and scope of a particular analysis at the outset because this will prescribe the course to follow. The perspective of the analysis is important, often dictating the approach to be used. Also, the ultimate use of the results of an analysis will influence the level of detail undertaken. The decision-making criteria of the potential investor must also be considered.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Short, W.; Packey, D.J. & Holt, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LIGHTING CONTROLS: SURVEY OF MARKET POTENTIAL

Description: This study describes the impact of lighting management systems that dynamically control lights in accordance with the needs of occupants. Various control strategies are described: scheduling, tuning, lumen depreciation, and daylighting. From initial experimental results, the energy savings provided by each of the above strategies are estimated to be 26, 12, 14, and 15%, respectively. Based upon a cost of $0.05-0.10 per kWh for electric energy and a 2-, 3-, or 4-yr payback, target costs for a simple and a sophisticated lighting management system are found to be $0.24 and 1.89 per ft{sup 2}, respectively, for a cost-effective investment. A growth model, based upon an extrapolation of the increase in building stock since 1975, indicates that the commercial and industrial (C and I) building stock will grow from 40 x 10{sup 9} ft{sup 2} in 1980 to about 67 x 10{sup 9} ft{sup 2} by the year 2000. Even with the use of more efficient lighting components, the energy required for this additional C and I stock will be 307 x 10{sup 9} kWh, an increase of only 13 x 10{sup 9} kWh above current use. The specified information is used to analyze the economic impacts that using these systems will have on the lighting industry, end users, utility companies, and the nation's economy. A $1 - 4 x 10{sup 9} annual lighting control industry can be generated, creating many jobs. The estimated return on investment (ROI) for controls for end users would be between 19 and 38%. Utilities will be able to make smaller additions to capacity and invest less capital at 7-10% ROI. Finally, the annual energy savings, up to $3.4 x 10{sup 9} for end users and about $5 x 10{sup 9} for utilities, representing unneeded generating capacity, will be available to capitalize other areas of the ...
Date: September 1, 1982
Creator: Verderber, R.R. & Rubinstein, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Impacts assessment for the National Ignition Facility

Description: This report documents the economic and other impacts that will be created by the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction and ongoing operation, as well as the impacts that may be created by new technologies that may be developed as a result of NIF development and operation.
Date: December 1, 1996
Creator: Bay Area Economics
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling National Impacts for the Building America Program

Description: In this paper we present a model to estimate the nationalenergy and economic impacts of the Department of Energy Building Americaprogram. The program goal is to improve energy performance in newresidential construction, by working with builders to design andconstruct energy-efficient homes at minimal cost. The model is anadaptation of the method used to calculate the national energy savingsfor appliance energy efficiency standards. The main difference is thatthe key decision here is not the consumer decision to buy anefficienthouse, but rather the builder decision to offer such a house inthe market. The builder decision is treated by developing a number ofscenarios in which the relative importance of first costs vs. energysavings is varied.
Date: June 15, 2006
Creator: Coughlin, Katie M. & McNeil, Michael A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford, diversification, and the Tri-Cities Economy FY 1998

Description: The missions of the U.S. Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office (DOE/RL) are to safely manage the Hanford Site, to manage and clean up its legacy wastes, and to develop and deploy new science and technology in the environmental and energy fields. Collectively, DOE/RL and its contractors are the most important single entity in the Tri-Cities local economy (Pasco, Kennewick, and Richland, Washington, and the surrounding area). Although the relevant economic region affected by DOE/RL and its contractors actually embraces a geographic area reaching from Yakima in the west to Walla Walla in the east and from Moses Lake in the north to Pendleton, Oregon, in the south, over 90% of economic impacts likely occur in Benton and Franklin Counties. These two counties are defined as the ''local'' Tri-Cities economy for purposes of this study (see Figure 1). In the federal fiscal year (IV) 1998 (October 1, 1997 through September 30, 1998), the total impact of DOEs local $1.6 billion budget was felt through payrolls of $519 million and local purchases of goods and services of $246 million. The total local spending of $765 million was down slightly from the FY 1997 total of $774 million. Taking into account the slightly greater multiplier effects of this spending due to changes in its mix, the DOE/RL budget sustained an estimated 36% of all local employment (31,200 out of 86,000 jobs) and up to 64% of local wage income ($1.55 billion out of $2.40 billion). This was up slightly from the year before (29,500 jobs, $1.49 billion income). DOE budget increases in FY 1999 are expected to result in a net increase of about 200 local DOE contractor jobs over the September 30, 1998 level, or about equal to the FY 1998 average. In addition, economic diversification more than offset the impact ...
Date: April 14, 1999
Creator: SCOTT, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department