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Testing of the Semikron Validation AIPM Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory -- October 2004

Description: This report documents the electrical tests performed on the Semikron high-voltage automotive integrated power module (AIPM) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Testing was performed in the 100-hp dynamometer test cell at the National Transportation Research Center.
Date: November 12, 2004
Creator: Nelson, S.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The dynamometer hub

Description: The construction of the dynamometer hub is illustrated and explained, and its electrical and aviation motor tests, as well as those in free flight, described.
Date: September 1920
Creator: Stieber, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbonyl Emissions from Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles

Description: Carbonyls from gasoline powered light-duty vehicles (LDVs) and heavy-duty diesel powered vehicles (HDDVs) operated on chassis dynamometers were measured using an annular denuder-quartz filter-polyurethane foam sampler with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine derivatization and chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Two internal standards were utilized based on carbonyl recovery, 4-fluorobenzaldehyde for<C8 carbonyls and 6-fluoro-4-chromanone for>_C8 compounds. Gas- and particle-phase emissions for 39 aliphatic and 20 aromatic carbonyls ranged from 0.1 ? 2000 ?g/L fuel for LDVs and 1.8 - 27000 mu g/L fuel for HDDVs. Gas-phase species accounted for 81-95percent of the total carbonyls from LDVs and 86-88percent from HDDVs. Particulate carbonyls emitted from a HDDV under realistic driving conditions were similar to concentrations measured in a diesel particulate matter (PM) standard reference material. Carbonyls accounted for 19percent of particulate organic carbon (POC) emissions from low-emission LDVs and 37percent of POC emissions from three-way catalyst equipped LDVs. This identifies carbonyls as one of the largest classes of compounds in LDV PM emissions. The carbonyl fraction of HDDV POC was lower, 3.3-3.9percent depending upon operational conditions. Partitioning analysis indicates the carbonyls had not achieved equilibrium between the gas- and particle-phase under the dilution factors of 126-584 used in the current study.
Date: December 1, 2007
Creator: Destaillats, Hugo; Jakober, Chris A.; Robert, Michael A.; Riddle, Sarah G.; Destaillats, Hugo; Charles, M. Judith et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Model year 2010 Ford Fusion Level-1 testing report.

Description: As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Ford Fusion was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of vehicle-level testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity. Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles, and A/C usage cycles were conducted. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database. The major results are shown in this report. Given the benchmark nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and sought to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current/voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed, engine load, and electric machine operation. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Fusion and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design.
Date: November 23, 2010
Creator: Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H. & Systems, Energy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Model year 2010 (Gen 3) Toyota Prius level 1 testing report.

Description: As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Toyota Prius (Generation 3) was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of 'Level 1' testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network connection, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer data). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles and A/C usage cycles were conducted. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D{sup 3}). The major results are shown here in this report. Given the preliminary nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and seeks to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from the exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current and voltage from a DC power analyzer, and minimal CAN bus data such as engine speed and pedal position. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Prius over standard regulatory cycles.
Date: June 24, 2010
Creator: Rask, E.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H.; Bocci, D. & Systems, Energy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Model year 2010 Honda insight level-1 testing report.

Description: As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Honda Insight was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of vehicle-level testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer data). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles and A/C usage cycles were tested. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D3). The major results are shown here in this report. Given the preliminary nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and seeks to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current and voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed, engine load, and electric machine operation when available. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Insight and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design.
Date: March 22, 2011
Creator: Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M. & Lohse-Busch, H. (Energy Systems)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of vibration and pressure pulsation in positive displacement drilling motors

Description: Three, Moineau principle, positive displacement (drilling) motors were tested on a dynamometer using water, air/mist, and foam. In conjunction with a traditional motor performance test, data were collected at 5000 samples per second using an adapted seismic data acquisition system. Shaft speed, torque, pressure, and three-axis vibration data were processed using Seismic Analysis Code (SAC) to obtain energy density spectrums (EDSs). Cascade plots were generated by plotting the EDSs against shaft speed. The cascade plots revealed that pressure pulses and motor vibrations are closely related to the eccentric rotation of the rotor in the power section. Excessive no-load vibrations were not observed in the small motors and test apparatus used; increasing torque usually decreases the amplitude of vibrations observed. Motor vibration amplitudes were as a rule not increased when compressible fluids were substituted for water.
Date: December 31, 1998
Creator: Hamlin, D.B. & Dreesen, D.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Additional dynamometer tests of the Ford Ecostar Electric Vehicle No. 41

Description: A Ford Ecostar vehicle was tested in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) Laboratory over two standard driving regimes, coastdown testing, and typical charge testing. The test vehicle was delivered to the INEL in February 19, 1995 under the DOE sponsored Modular Electric Vehicle Program. This report presents the results of dynamometer driving cycle tests, charge data, and coastdown testing for California Air Resources Board (CARB) under a CRADA with the Department Of Energy (DOE).
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: Cole, G.H.; Richardson, R.A. & Yarger, E.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dynamometer testing of the U.S. Electricar Geo Prizm conversion electric vehicle

Description: A Geo Prizm electric vehicle conversion by U.S. Electricar was tested in the INEL HEV Laboratory over several standard driving regimes. The vehicle, owned by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP), was loaned to the INEL for performance testing under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB). The Prizm conversion is the fourth vehicle in the planned test series. A summary of the test results is presented as Table ES-1. For the LA-92 and the Highway Fuel Economy Test cycles, the driving cycle ranges were 71 and 95 km, respectively. The net DC energy consumption during these cycles was measured at 199 and 154 W-h/km, respectively. During the constant-current-discharge test, the vehicle was driven 150 km at an average steady speed of 43 km/h. Energy consumption at various steady-state speeds, averaged over two tests, was approximately 108 W-h/km at 40 km/hr and 175 W-h/km at 96 km/h at 80T state-of-charge (SOC). Gradeability-at-speed tests indicated that the vehicle can be driven at 80 km/h up a simulated 5% grade for periods up to 15 minutes beginning at an initial 100% SOC, and 3 minutes beginning at 80% battery depth-of-discharge (DOD). Maximum-effort vehicle acceleration times were determined at five different battery DODs and speeds from 24 to 104 km/h. The acceleration is approximately linear up to 48 km/h, with no DOD effect; at higher speeds the curve becomes non-linear, and the effect of DOD becomes increasingly evident. Gradeability at each of these speeds was also determined, showing a decrease from the initial 26% at 24 km/h to 4% at 104 km/h.
Date: April 1, 1996
Creator: Richardson, R.A.; Yarger, E.J. & Cole, G.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Diesel hybridization and emissions.

Description: The CTR Vehicle Systems and Fuels team a diesel hybrid powertrain. The goal of this experiment was to investigate and demonstrate the potential of diesel engines for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) in a fuel economy and emissions. The test set-up consisted of a diesel engine coupled to an electric motor driving a Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT). This hybrid drive is connected to a dynamometer and a DC electrical power source creating a vehicle context by combining advanced computer models and emulation techniques. The experiment focuses on the impact of the hybrid control strategy on fuel economy and emissions-in particular, nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM). The same hardware and test procedure were used throughout the entire experiment to assess the impact of different control approaches.
Date: April 21, 2004
Creator: Pasquier, M. & Monnet, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THE EFFECTS OF BIODIESEL BLENDS AND ARCO EC-DIESEL ON EMISSIONS from LIGHT HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL VEHICLES

Description: Chassis dynamometer tests were performed on 7 light heavy-duty diesel trucks comparing the emissions of a California diesel fuel with emissions from 4 other fuels: ARCO EC-diesel (EC-D) and three 20% biodiesel blends (1 yellow grease and 2 soy-based). The EC-D and the yellow grease biodiesel blend both showed significant reductions in THC and CO emissions over the test vehicle fleet. EC-D also showed reductions in PM emission rates. NOx emissions were comparable for the different fuel types over the range of vehicles tested. The soy-based biodiesel blends did not show significant or consistent emissions differences over all test vehicles. Total carbon accounted for more than 70% of the PM mass for 4 of the 5 sampled vehicles. Elemental and organic carbon ratios varied significantly from vehicle-to-vehicle but showed very little fuel dependence. Inorganic species represented a smaller portion of the composite total, ranging from 0.2 to 3.3% of the total PM. Total PAH emissions ranged from approximately 1.8 mg/mi to 67.8 mg/mi over the different vehicle/fuel combinations representing between 1.6 and 3.8% of the total PM mass.
Date: August 5, 2001
Creator: Durbin, Thomas
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Detroit Diesel Engine Technology for Light Duty Truck Applications - DELTA Engine Update

Description: The early generation of the DELTA engine has been thoroughly tested and characterized in the virtual lab, during engine dynamometer testing, and on light duty trucks for personal transportation. This paper provides an up-to-date account of program findings. Further, the next generation engine design and future program plans will be briefly presented.
Date: August 20, 2000
Creator: Freese, Charlie
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ADVANCED DIESEL ENGINE AND AFTERTREATMENT TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR TIER 2 EMISSIONS

Description: Advanced diesel engine and aftertreatment technologies have been developed for multiple engine and vehicle platforms. Tier 2 (2007 and beyond) emissions levels have been demonstrated for a light truck vehicle over a FTP-75 test cycle on a vehicle chassis dynamometer. These low emissions levels are obtained while retaining the fuel economy advantage characteristic of diesel engines. The performance and emissions results were achieved by integrating advanced combustion strategies (CLEAN Combustion{copyright}) with prototype aftertreatment systems. CLEAN Combustion{copyright} allows partial control of exhaust species for aftertreatment integration in addition to simultaneous NOx and PM reduction. Analytical tools enabled the engine and aftertreatment sub-systems development and system integration. The experimental technology development methodology utilized a range of facilities to streamline development of the eventual solution including utilization of steady state and transient dynamometer test-beds to simulate chassis dynamometer test cycles.
Date: August 24, 2003
Creator: Aneja, R.; Bolton, B; Oladipo, A; Pavlova-MacKinnon, Z & Radwan, A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dynamometer Testing of Samsung 2.5MW Drivetrain: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-311

Description: SHI's prototype 2.5 MW wind turbine drivetrain was tested at the NWTC 2.5 MW dynamometer test facility over the course of 4 months between December 2009 and March 2010. This successful testing campaign allowed SHI to validate performance, safety, control tuning, and reliability in a controlled environment before moving to full-scale testing and subsequent introduction of a commercial product into the American market.
Date: February 1, 2011
Creator: Wallen, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Discovery of New NOx Reduction Catalysts for CIDI Engines Using Combinatorial Techniques

Description: This project for the discovery of new lean reduction NOx catalysts was initiated on August 16th, 2002 and is now into its fourth year. Several materials have already been identified as NOx reduction catalysts for possible future application. NOx reduction catalysts are a critical need in the North American vehicle market since these catalysts are needed to enable both diesels and lean gasoline engines to meet the 2007-2010 emission standards. Hydrocarbon selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a preferred technology since it requires no infrastructure changes (as may be expected for urea SCR) and most likely has the simplest engine control strategy of the three proposed NOx reduction approaches. The use of fast throughput techniques and informatics greatly enhances the possibility of discovering new NOx reduction catalysts. Using fast throughput techniques this project has already screened over 3000 new materials and evaluates hundreds of new materials a month. Evaluating such a high number of new materials puts this approach into a very different paradigm than previous discovery approaches for new NOx reduction catalysts. With so much data on materials it is necessary to use statistical techniques to identify the potential catalysts and these statistical techniques are needed to optimize compositions of the multi-component materials that are identified under the program as possible new lean NOx catalysts. Several new materials have conversions in excess of 80% at temperatures above 300 C. That is more than twice the activity of previous HC SCR materials. These materials are candidates for emission control on heavy-duty systems (i.e.; over 8500 pounds gross weight). Tests of one of the downselected materials on an engine dynamometer show NOx reductions greater than 80% under some conditions even though the net NOx reductions on the HWFET and the US06 cycles were relatively low. The program is scheduled to continue until ...
Date: August 15, 2005
Creator: Blint, Richard J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Correlating Dynamometer Testing to In-Use Fleet Results of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles

Description: Standard dynamometer test procedures are currently being developed to determine fuel and electrical energy consumption of plug-in hybrid vehicles (PHEV). To define a repeatable test procedure, assumptions were made about how PHEVs will be driven and charged. This study evaluates these assumptions by comparing results of PHEV dynamometer testing following proposed procedures to actual performance of PHEVs operating in the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) North American PHEV Demonstration fleet. Results show PHEVs in the fleet exhibit a wide range of energy consumption, which is not demonstrated in dynamometer testing. Sources of variation in performance are identified and examined.
Date: May 1, 2009
Creator: Smart, John G.; White, Sera & Duoba, Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

U.S. Department of Energy -- Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing and Demonstration Activities

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) tests plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in closed track, dynamometer and onroad testing environments. The onroad testing includes the use of dedicated drivers on repeated urban and highway driving cycles that range from 10 to 200 miles, with recharging between each loop. Fleet demonstrations with onboard data collectors are also ongoing with PHEVs operating in several dozen states and Canadian Provinces, during which trips- and miles-per-charge, charging demand and energy profiles, and miles-per-gallon and miles-per-kilowatt-hour fuel use results are all documented, allowing an understanding of fuel use when vehicles are operated in charge depleting, charge sustaining, and mixed charge modes. The intent of the PHEV testing includes documenting the petroleum reduction potential of the PHEV concept, the infrastructure requirements, and operator recharging influences and profiles. As of May 2008, the AVTA has conducted track and dynamometer testing on six PHEV conversion models and fleet testing on 70 PHEVs representing nine PHEV conversion models. A total of 150 PHEVs will be in fleet testing by the end of 2008, all with onboard data loggers. The onroad testing to date has demonstrated 100+ miles per gallon results in mostly urban applications for approximately the first 40 miles of PHEV operations. The primary goal of the AVTA is to provide advanced technology vehicle performance benchmark data for technology modelers, research and development programs, and technology goal setters. The AVTA testing results also assist fleet managers in making informed vehicle purchase, deployment and operating decisions. The AVTA is part of DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation, with Argonne National Laboratory providing dynamometer testing support. The proposed paper and presentation will discuss PHEV testing activities and results. INL/CON-08-14333
Date: May 1, 2009
Creator: Francfort, James E.; Karner, Donald & Smart, John G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Diesel and CNG Transit Bus Emissions Characterization By Two Chassis Dynamometer Laboratories: Results and Issues

Description: Emissions of six 32 passenger transit buses were characterized using one of the West Virginia University (WVU) Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratories, and the fixed base chassis dynamometer at the Colorado Institute for Fuels and High Altitude Engine Research (CIFHAER). Three of the buses were powered with 1997 ISB 5.9 liter Cummins diesel engines, and three were powered with the 1997 5.9 liter Cummins natural gas (NG) counterpart. The NG engines were LEV certified. Objectives were to contrast the emissions performance of the diesel and NG units, and to compare results from the two laboratories. Both laboratories found that oxides of nitrogen and particulate matter (PM) emissions were substantially lower for the natural gas buses than for the diesel buses. It was observed that by varying the rapidity of pedal movement during accelerations in the Central Business District cycle (CBD), CO and PM emissions from the diesel buses could be varied by a factor of three or more. The driving styles may be characterized as aggressive and non-aggressive, but both styles followed the CBD speed command acceptably. PM emissions were far higher for the aggressive driving style. For the NG fueled vehicles driving style had a similar, although smaller, effect on NO{sub x}. It is evident that driver habits may cause substantial deviation in emissions for the CBD cycle. When the CO emissions are used as a surrogate for driver aggression, a regression analysis shows that NO{sub x} and PM emissions from the two laboratories agree closely for equivalent driving style. Implications of driver habit for emissions inventories and regulations are briefly considered.
Date: May 3, 1999
Creator: Clark, Nigel N.; Rapp, Byron L.; Lyons, Donald W.; Graboski, Michael S.; McCormick, Robert L.; Alleman, Teresa L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy efficiency dynamometer testing at the 1996 American Tour de Sol

Description: In 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy through Argonne National Laboratory`s Center for Transportation Research sponsored energy efficiency data collection from the student, private, and professional vehicles during the American Tour de Sol. The American Tour de Sol is a multiple-day road rally event run from New York City to Washington, D.C. As part of this efficiency testing, a number of vehicles were tested on a chassis dynamometer utilizing three common drive cycles: the LA-4, the New York City Cycle, and the Highway Fuel Economy Test. The results demonstrate remarkable efficiency increases over a gasoline control vehicle and significant cycle-sensitivity information. Two series hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) were shown to have fuel efficiencies which were less sensitive to drive cycle than either a gasoline or an electric vehicle.
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Sluder, S.; Duoba, M.; Buitrago, C.; Leblanc, N. & Larsen, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sodium sulfur electric vehicle battery engineering program final report, September 2, 1986--June 15, 1993

Description: In September 1986 a contract was signed between Chloride Silent Power Limited (CSPL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) entitled ``Sodium Sulfur Electric Vehicle Battery Engineering Program``. The aim of the cost shared program was to advance the state of the art of sodium sulfur batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Initially, the work statement was non-specific in regard to the vehicle to be used as the design and test platform. Under a separate contract with the DOE, Ford Motor Company was designing an advanced electric vehicle drive system. This program, called the ETX II, used a modified Aerostar van for its platform. In 1987, the ETX II vehicle was adopted for the purposes of this contract. This report details the development and testing of a series of battery designs and concepts which led to the testing, in the US, of three substantial battery deliverables.
Date: June 1, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter Performance in a Light-Duty Vehicle

Description: Light-duty chassis dynamometer driving cycle tests were conducted on a Mercedes A170 diesel vehicle with various sulfur-level fuels and exhaust emission control systems. Triplicate runs of a modified light-duty federal test procedure (FTP), US06 cycle, and SCO3 cycle were conducted with each exhaust configuration and fuel. Ultra-low sulfur (3-ppm) diesel fuel was doped to 30- and 150-ppm sulfur so that all other fuel properties remained the same. The fuels used in these experiments met the specifications of the fuels from the DECSE (Diesel Emission Control Sulfur Effects) program. Although the Mercedes A170 vehicle is not available in the US, its emissions in the as tested condition fell within the U.S. Tier 1 full useful life standards with the OEM catalysts installed. Tests with the OEM catalysts removed showed that the OEM catalysts reduced PM emissions from the engine-out condition by 30-40% but had negligible effects on NOx emissions. Fuel sulfur level had very little effect on th e OEM catalyst performance. A prototype catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF) mounted in an underfloor configuration reduced particulate matter emissions by more than 90% compared to the factory emissions control system. The results show that the CDPF did not promote any significant amounts of SO{sub 2}-to-sulfate conversion during these light-duty drive cycles.
Date: April 23, 2001
Creator: Sluder, C.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Issues in emissions testing of hybrid electric vehicles.

Description: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has tested more than 100 prototype HEVs built by colleges and universities since 1994 and has learned that using standardized dynamometer testing procedures can be problematic. This paper addresses the issues related to HEV dynamometer testing procedures and proposes a new testing approach. The proposed ANL testing procedure is based on careful hybrid operation mode characterization that can be applied to certification and R and D. HEVs also present new emissions measurement challenges because of their potential for ultra-low emission levels and frequent engine shutdown during the test cycles.
Date: May 23, 2000
Creator: Duoba, M.; Anderson, J. & Ng, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Zirconia-Based Mixed Potential CO/HC Sensors with LaMnO3 and Th-doped YSZ Electrodes

Description: Abstract: We have investigated the performance of dual metal oxide electrode mixed potential sensors in an engine-out, dynamometer environment. Sensors were fabricated by sputtering thin films of LaMnO{sub 3} and Tb-doped YSZ onto YSZ electrolyte. Au gauze held onto the metal oxide thin films with Au ink was used for current collection. The exhaust gas from a 4.8L, V8 engine operated in open loop, steady-state mode around stoichiometry at 1500 RPM and 50 Nm. The sensor showed a stable EMF response (with no hysteresis) to varying concentrations of total exhaust gas HC content. The sensor response was measured at 620 and 670 C and shows temperature behavior characteristic of mixed potential-type sensors. The results of these engine-dynamometer tests are encouraging; however, the limitations associated with Au current collection present the biggest impediment to automotive use.
Date: October 1, 2000
Creator: Brosha, Eric L.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Brown, David R.; Garzon, Fernando H.; Visser, J. H.; Thompson, David J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department