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Report on ignitability testing of flammable gasses in a core sampling drill string

Description: This document describes the results from testing performed at the Pittsburgh Research Center to determine the effects of an ignition of flammable gasses contained in a core sampling drill string. Testing showed that 1) An ignition of stoichiometric hydrogen and air in a vented 30 or 55 ft length of drill string will not force 28`` or more of water out the bottom of the drill string, and 2) An ignition of this same gas mixture will not rupture a vented or completely sealed drill string.
Date: December 1, 1996
Creator: Witwer, K. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DEVELOPMENT AND MANUFACTURE OF COST EFFECTIVE COMPOSITE DRILL PIPE

Description: This technical report presents the engineering research, process development and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report presents progress made from October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004 and contains the following discussions: (1) Direct Electrical Connection for Rotary Shoulder Tool Joints; (2) Conductors for inclusion in the pipe wall (ER/DW-CDP); (3) Qualify fibers from Zoltek; (4) Qualify resin from Bakelite; (5) First commercial order for SR-CDP from Integrated Directional Resources (SR-CDP); and (6) Preparation of papers for publication and conference presentations.
Date: March 18, 2005
Creator: Leslie, James C.; II, James C. Leslie; Truong, Lee; Heard, James T. & Manekas, Peter
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DEVELOPMENT AND MANUFACTURE OF COST EFFECTIVE COMPOSITE DRILL PIPE

Description: This annual, technical report will discuss the engineering research and data accomplishments that have transpired in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report discusses and illustrates the first iteration design of the tube and the tool joint interface. The report discusses standards and specifications to which the CDP design will be tailored and tested, and discusses conclusions of the first iteration design for future design enhancements.
Date: October 30, 2000
Creator: Leslie, Dr. James C.; Jean, Mr. Jeffrey R.; Neubert, Hans & Truong, Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microhole High-Pressure Jet Drill for Coiled Tubing

Description: Tempress Small Mechanically-Assisted High-Pressure Waterjet Drilling Tool project centered on the development of a downhole intensifier (DHI) to boost the hydraulic pressure available from conventional coiled tubing to the level required for high-pressure jet erosion of rock. We reviewed two techniques for implementing this technology (1) pure high-pressure jet drilling and (2) mechanically-assisted jet drilling. Due to the difficulties associated with modifying a downhole motor for mechanically-assisted jet drilling, it was determined that the pure high-pressure jet drilling tool was the best candidate for development and commercialization. It was also determined that this tool needs to run on commingled nitrogen and water to provide adequate downhole differential pressure and to facilitate controlled pressure drilling and descaling applications in low pressure wells. The resulting Microhole jet drilling bottomhole assembly (BHA) drills a 3.625-inch diameter hole with 2-inch coil tubing. The BHA consists of a self-rotating multi-nozzle drilling head, a high-pressure rotary seal/bearing section, an intensifier and a gas separator. Commingled nitrogen and water are separated into two streams in the gas separator. The water stream is pressurized to 3 times the inlet pressure by the downhole intensifier and discharged through nozzles in the drilling head. The energy in the gas-rich stream is used to power the intensifier. Gas-rich exhaust from the intensifier is conducted to the nozzle head where it is used to shroud the jets, increasing their effective range. The prototype BHA was tested at operational pressures and flows in a test chamber and on the end of conventional coiled tubing in a test well. During instrumented runs at downhole conditions, the BHA developed downhole differential pressures of 74 MPa (11,000 psi, median) and 90 MPa (13,000 psi, peaks). The median output differential pressure was nearly 3 times the input differential pressure available from the coiled tubing. In a chamber ...
Date: June 30, 2007
Creator: Theimer, Ken & Kolle, Jack
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and Manufacture of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe

Description: This technical report presents the engineering research, process development and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report presents progress made from October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006 and contains the following discussions: Qualification Testing; Prototype Development and Testing of ''Smart Design'' Configuration; Field Test Demonstration; Development of Ultra-Short Radius Composite Drill Pipe (USR-CDP); and Development of Smart USR-CDP.
Date: September 29, 2006
Creator: Leslie, James C.; James C. Leslie, II; Truong, Lee & Heard, James T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and Manufacture of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe

Description: This technical report presents the engineering research and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report reiterates the presentation made to DOE/NETL in Morgantown, WV on August 1st, 2002 with the addition of accomplishments made from that time forward until the issue date. The following have been accomplished and are reported in detail herein: {sm_bullet} Specifications for both 5-1/2'' and 1-5/8'' composite drill pipe have been finalized. {sm_bullet} Full scale testing of Short Radius (SR) CDP has been conducted. {sm_bullet} Successful demonstration of metal to composite interface (MCI) connection. {sm_bullet} Preparations for full scale manufacturing of ER/DW CDP have begun. {sm_bullet} Manufacturing facility rearranged to accommodate CDP process flow through plant. {sm_bullet} Arrangements to have the 3 3/8'' CDP used in 4 separate drilling applications in Oman, Oklahoma, and Texas.
Date: September 29, 2002
Creator: Leslie, James C.; Jean, Jeffrey R.; Neubert, Hans; Truong, Lee & Heard, James T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Testing the propagation of flammable gasses in a core sampling drill string

Description: This document describes testing to be carried out at the Pittsburgh Research Center to determine the effects of an explosion occuring within a length of drill pipe. The results will help quantify hazards involved with core sampling in a Flammable Watch List Tank on the Hanford Nuclear Site.
Date: October 9, 1996
Creator: Witwer, K.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DEVELOPMENT AND MANUFACTURE OF COST EFFECTIVE COMPOSITE DRILL PIPE

Description: This technical report presents the engineering research and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report presents accomplishments made from October 1, 2002 through September 30, 2003. The following have been accomplished and are reported in detail herein: Metal-to-Composite Interface (MCI) redesign and testing; Successful demonstration of MCI connection for both SR and ER/DW CDP; Specifications for a 127mm (5 inch) ID by 152.4 mm (6 inch) OD composite drill pipe have been finalized for Extended Reach/Deep Water applications (ER/DW); Field testing of Short Radius CDP (SR); Sealing composite laminate to contain high pressure; Amendments; Amendment for ''Smart'' feature added to ER/DW development along with time and funding to complete battery of qualification tests with option for field demonstration; and Preparation of papers for publication and conference presentations.
Date: March 30, 2003
Creator: Leslie, James C.; II, James C. Leslie; Truong, Lee & Heard, James T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DEVELOPMENT AND MANUFACTURE OF COST EFFECTIVE COMPOSITE DRILL PIPE

Description: This technical report presents the engineering research and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report discusses and illustrates all progress in the first two years of this NETL/DOE supported program. The following have been accomplished and are reported in detail herein: (1) Specifications for both 5 5/16 inch and 3 3/8 inch composite drill pipe have been finalized. (2) All basic laboratory testing has been completed and has provide sufficient data for the selection of materials for the composite tubing, adhesives, and abrasion coatings. (3) Successful demonstration of composite/metal joint interfacial connection. (4) Upgrade of facilities to provide a functional pilot plant manufacturing facility. (5) Arrangements to have the 3 3/8 inch CDP used in a drilling operation early in C.Y. 2002. (6) Arrangements to have the 5 5/16 inch CDP marketed and produced by a major drill pipe manufacturer.
Date: October 30, 2001
Creator: Leslie, James C.; Jean, Jeffrey R.; Neubert, Hans & Truong, Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

VERY HIGH-SPEED DRILL STRING COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK

Description: Testing of recent upgrades to the drill pipe telemetry system in a 1000-ft vertical well has shown that the new system can achieve at least 1,000 ft passive transmission distance with sufficient bandwidth to accommodate a digital transmission rate of 2 Mbit/sec. Digitized data from a module at the bottom of the well has been successfully transmitted through the transmission line to the top of the well for a period of approximately one month. Manufacture of 30 prototype range 2 drill pipes has demonstrated greater simplicity of manufacturing and greater consistency of electrical characteristics from part to part, as compared to the first production run previously reported. Further work is needed to improve the high pressure capability of the system and to improve the robustness of the system in a high-vibration environment.
Date: August 1, 2002
Creator: Pixton, David S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Friction Reduction for Microhole CT Drilling

Description: The objective of this 24 month project focused on improving microhole coiled tubing drilling bottom hole assembly (BHA) reliability and performance, while reducing the drilling cost and complexity associated with inclined/horizontal well sections. This was to be accomplished by eliminating the need for a downhole drilling tractor or other downhole coiled tubing (CT) friction mitigation techniques when drilling long (>2,000 ft.) of inclined/horizontal wellbore. The technical solution to be developed and evaluated in this project was based on vibrating the coiled tubing at surface to reduce the friction along the length of the downhole CT drillstring. The Phase 1 objective of this project centered on determining the optimum surface-applied vibration system design for downhole CT friction mitigation. Design of the system would be based on numerical modeling and laboratory testing of the CT friction mitigation achieved with various types of surface-applied vibration. A numerical model was developed to predict how far downhole the surface-applied vibration would travel. A vibration test fixture, simulating microhole CT drilling in a horizontal wellbore, was constructed and used to refine and validate the numerical model. Numerous tests, with varying surface-applied vibration parameters were evaluated in the vibration test fixture. The data indicated that as long as the axial force on the CT was less than the helical buckling load, axial vibration of the CT was effective at mitigating friction. However, surface-applied vibration only provided a small amount of friction mitigation as the helical buckling load on the CT was reached or exceeded. Since it would be impractical to assume that routine field operations be conducted at less than the helical buckling load of the CT, it was determined that this technical approach did not warrant the additional cost and maintenance issues that would be associated with the surface vibration equipment. As such, the project was ...
Date: March 31, 2007
Creator: Newman, Ken; Kelleher, Patrick & Smalley, Edward
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and Application of Insulated Drill Pipe for High Temperature, High Pressure Drilling

Description: This project aimed to extend the insulated drill pipe (IDP) technology already demonstrated for geothermal drilling to HTHP drilling in deep gas reservoirs where temperatures are high enough to pose a threat to downhole equipment such as motors and electronics. The major components of the project were: a preliminary design; a market survey to assess industry needs and performance criteria; mechanical testing to verify strength and durability of IDP; and development of an inspection plan that would quantify the ability of various inspection techniques to detect flaws in assembled IDP. This report is a detailed description of those activities.
Date: December 31, 2008
Creator: Champness, Tom; Worthen, Tony & Finger, John
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and testing of insulated drillpipe

Description: The Geothermal Research Department at Sandia National Laboratories, in collaboration with Drill Cool Systems, Inc., has worked to develop and test insulated drillpipe (IDP). IDP will allow much cooler drilling fluid to reach the bottom of the hole, making possible the use of downhole motors, electronics, and steering tools that are now unusable in high-temperature formations. Other advantages of cooler fluid include reduced degradation of drilling fluid, longer bit life, and reduced corrosion rates. The paper describes the theoretical background, laboratory testing, and field testing of IDP. Structural and thermal laboratory testing procedures and results are described. Results are given for a field test in a geothermal well, in which circulating temperatures in IDP are compared with those in conventional drillpipe (CDP) at different flow rates. A brief description of the software used to model wellbore temperature and to calculate sensitivity to IDP design differences is included, along with a comparison of calculated and measured wellbore temperatures in the field test. Analysis of mixed (IDP and CDP) drill strings and discussion of where IDP should be placed in a mixed string are presented.
Date: January 26, 2000
Creator: FINGER,JOHN T.; JACOBSON,RONALD D. & CHAMPNESS,A.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Drill pipe protector development

Description: The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), formed in the early 1980s by the geothermal industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Division, sponsors specific development projects to advance the technologies used in geothermal exploration, drilling, and production phases. Individual GDO member companies can choose to participate in specific projects that are most beneficial to their industry segment. Sandia National Laboratories is the technical interface and contracting office for the DOE in these projects. Typical projects sponsored in the past have included a high temperature borehole televiewer, drill bits, muds/polymers, rotary head seals, and this project for drill pipe protectors. This report documents the development work of Regal International for high temperature geothermal pipe protectors.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Thomerson, C.; Kenne, R. & Wemple, R.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stress and Permeability Heterogeneity within the Dixie Valley Geothermal Reservoir: Recent Results from Well 82-5

Description: We collected borehole televiewer, temperature and flowmeter logs and conducted a hydraulic fracturing test in a well (82-5) that penetrated the SFZ within the known boundaries of the geothermal field but which failed to encounter significant permeability. Although stuck drill pipe prevented direct access to the SFZ, borehole breakouts and cooling cracks indicated a {approximately}90 degree rotation in the azimuth of the least horizontal principal stress (Shmin) in well 82-5 at about 2.7 km depth. This rotation, together with the low (Shmin) magnitude measured at 2.5 km depth in well 82-5, is most readily explained through the occurrences of one or more normal faulting earthquakes in the hanging wall of the SFZ in the northern part of the reservoir. The orientation of (Shmin) below 2.7 km (i.e., {approximately}20 to 50 m above the top of the SFZ) is such that both the overall SFZ and natural fractures directly above the SFZ are optimally oriented for normal faulting failure. If these fracture and stress orient ations persist into the SFZ itself, then the existence of a local stress relief zone (i.e., anormalously high (Shmin) magnitude) is the most likely explanation for the very low fault zone permeability encountered in well 82-5.
Date: December 1, 1999
Creator: Hickman, S. H.; Zoback, M. D.; Barton, C. A.; Benoit, R.; Svitek, J. & Summers, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

Description: This Quarter has been divided between running experiments and the installation of the drill-pipe rotation system. In addition, valves and piping were relocated, and three viewports were installed. Detailed design work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. Design of the first prototype version of a Foam Generator has been finalized, and fabrication is underway. This will be used to determine the relationship between surface roughness and ''slip'' of foams at solid boundaries. Additional cups and rotors are being machined with different surface roughness. Some experiments on cuttings transport with aerated fluids have been conducted at EPET. Theoretical modeling of cuttings transport with aerated fluids is proceeding. The development of theoretical models to predict frictional pressure losses of flowing foam is in progress. The new board design for instrumentation to measure cuttings concentration is now functioning with an acceptable noise level. The ultrasonic sensors are stable up to 190 F. Static tests with sand in an annulus indicate that the system is able to distinguish between different sand concentrations. Viscometer tests with foam, generated by the Dynamic Test Facility (DTF), are continuing.
Date: July 30, 2003
Creator: Reed, Troy; Miska, Stefan; Takach, Nicholas; Ashenayi, Kaveh; Pickell, Mark; Volk, Len et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

VERY HIGH-SPEED DRILL STRING COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK

Description: Testing of a high-speed digital data transmission system for drill pipe is described. Passive transmission of digital data through 1000 ft of telemetry drill pipe has been successfully achieved. Data rates of up to 2 Mbit/sec have been tested through the 1000 ft system with very low occurrence of data errors: required error correction effort is very low or nonexistent. Further design modifications have been made to improve manufacturability and high pressure robustness of the transmission line components. Failure mechanisms of previous designs at high pressure and high temperature are described. Present design limitations include high temperature application.
Date: November 1, 2002
Creator: Pixton, David S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Drill Pipe Corrosion Control Using an Inert Drilling Fluid

Description: The results of a geothermal drill pipe corrosion field test are presented. When a low-density drilling fluid was required for drilling a geothermal well because of an underpressured, fractured formation, two drilling fluids were alternately used to compare drill pipe corrosion rates. The first fluid was an air-water mist with corrosion control chemicals. The other fluid was a nitrogen-water mist without added chemicals. The test was conducted during November 1980 at the Baca location in northern New Mexico. Data from corrosion rings, corrosion probes, fluid samples and flow line instrumentation are plotted for the ten day test period. it is shown that the inert drilling fluid, nitrogen, reduced corrosion rates by more than an order of magnitude. Test setup and procedures are also discussed.
Date: January 1, 1981
Creator: Caskey, B. C. & Copass, K. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hard Rock Penetration - Summary

Description: The theme of this review, ''Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market--The Opportunities and Challenges for Expanding Geothermal Energy in a Competitive Supply Market'', ties in directly with the subject of this session. That is, it follows immediately that the establishment, utilization and maintenance of the borehole for extracting energy and data are the first and continuing concerns of the geothermal industry in expanding that resource's role in the utility market. There is probably no portion of the utilization of the geothermal energy resource that more determines the cost competitiveness of that resource than the cost of reaching and delivering the heat energy. Therefore, there is probably no other area where advances in the state-of-the-art can be more directly and profitably applied to the theme of this review. The four subjects in this session feature the activities under the program conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque). Specifically, an overview is presented, a discussion of advances in acoustic telemetry, the status of lost circulation technology development, and a description of downhole memory-logging tools. One of the points of emphasis in the overview concerned slimhole drilling. The cost advantages of a smaller diameter borehole are intuitively obvious. The possibility of cutting drilling costs by half opens up the possibility of conducting more detailed mapping of the thermal reserves. This is particularly attractive for the Pacific Northwest, where a power shortage looms in the future. There is substantial evidence of significant useful thermal reserves in the area. However, the capability of tapping them is, in many cases, dependent upon finding drilling locations not only advantageously related to the power grid, but suitably related to natural features and environmental considerations. These requirements demand a practical method of getting more accurate maps of the resource. Slimhole drilling could well provide the answer. As stated in ...
Date: March 24, 1992
Creator: Tennyson, George P. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Acoustic telemetry.

Description: Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.
Date: August 1, 2003
Creator: Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer & Kuszmaul, Scott S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Near-Term Developments in Geothermal Drilling

Description: The DOE Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling geothermal wells. Current projects include: R & D in lost circulation control, high temperature instrumentation, underground imaging with a borehole radar insulated drill pipe development for high temperature formations, and new technology for data transmission through drill pipe that can potentially greatly improve data rates for measurement while drilling systems. In addition to this work, projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization are managed. During 1988, GDO projects include developments in five areas: high temperature acoustic televiewer, pneumatic turbine, urethane foam for lost circulation control, geothermal drill pipe protectors, an improved rotary head seals.
Date: March 21, 1989
Creator: Dunn, James C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and Manufacture of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe

Description: This technical report presents the engineering research, process development and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report presents progress made from October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2005 and contains the following discussions: (1) Qualification Testing; (2) Prototype Development and Testing of ''Smart Design'' Configuration; (3) Field Test Demonstration; and (4) Commercial order for SR-CDP from Torch International. The objective of this contract is to develop and demonstrate ''cost effective'' Composite Drill Pipe. It is projected that this drill pipe will weigh less than half of its steel counter part. The resultant weight reduction will provide enabling technology that will increase the lateral distance that can be reached from an offshore drilling platform and the depth of water in which drilling and production operations can be carried out. Further, composite drill pipe has the capability to carry real time signal and power transmission within the pipe walls. CDP can also accommodate much shorter drilling radius than is possible with metal drill pipe. As secondary benefits, the lighter weight drill pipe can increase the storage capability of floating off shore drilling platforms and provide substantial operational cost savings.
Date: February 20, 2006
Creator: Leslie, James C.; II, James C. Leslie; Truong, Lee; Heard, James T. & Loya, Steve
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department