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LLNL NESHAPs project 1997 annual report

Description: NESHAP`s limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent (EDE) of 10 mrem (100 ({mu}Sv) to any member of the public The EDEs for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site- wide maximally exposed members of the public from 1997 operations were Livermore site. 0 097 mrem (0 97 {mu}Sv) (80% from point-source emissions), 20% from diffuse-source emissions), Site 300 0 014 mrem (O 14 {mu}Sv) (38% from point-source emissions, 62% from diffuse-source emissions) The EDEs were generally calculated using the EPA-approved CAP88-PC air- dispersion/dose-assessment model Site-specific meteorological data, stack flow data, and emissions estimates based on radionuclide inventory data or continuous-monitoring systems data were the specific input to CAP88-PC for each modeled source.
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Gallegos, G.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2007

Description: Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). The EPA regulates radionuclide emissions that may be released from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or that may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2007, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor stack or building emissions sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]), there were no diffuse emissions, and there were no unplanned emissions. Emissions from minor sources either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities received for use or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, Version 3.0, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2007 is 1.2 x 10{sup -2} mrem/yr (1.2 x 10{sup -4} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) EPA dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 3.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (3.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2007.
Date: June 13, 2008
Creator: Wahl, Linnea & Wahl, Linnea
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2008

Description: Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radioactive air emission regulations in Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 40, Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2008, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources include more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2008 is 5.2 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (5.2 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.1 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.1 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2008.
Date: May 21, 2009
Creator: Wahl, Linnea
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations

Description: This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.
Date: May 31, 2011
Creator: Wen, J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The use of microdosimetric techniques in radiation protection measurements

Description: A major objective of radiation protection is to determine the dose equivalent for routine radiation protection applications. As microdosimetry has developed over approximately three decades, its most important application has been in measuring radiation quality, especially in radiation fields of unknown or inadequately known energy spectra. In these radiation fields, determination of dose equivalent is not straightforward; however, the use of microdosimetric principles and techniques could solve this problem. In this paper, the authors discuss the measurement of lineal energy, a microscopic analog to linear energy transfer, and demonstrate the development and implementation of the variance-covariance method, a novel method in experimental microdosimetry. This method permits the determination of dose mean lineal energy, an essential parameter of radiation quality, in a radiation field of unknown spectrum, time-varying dose rate, and high dose rate. Real-time monitoring of changes in radiation quality can also be achieved by using microdosimetric techniques.
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Chen, J.; Hsu, H.H.; Casson, W.H. & Vasilik, D.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

US Department of Energy report 1996 LANL radionuclide air emissions

Description: Presented is the Laboratory-wide certified report regarding radioactive effluents released into the air by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 1996. This information is required under the Clean Air Act and is being reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a hypothetical maximum exposed individual (MEI) of the public was calculated, using procedures specified by the EPA and described in this report. That dose was 1.93 mrem for 1996. Emissions of {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N, and {sup 15}O from a 1-mA, 800 MeV proton accelerator contributed over 92% of the EDE to LANL`s MEI. Using CAP88, the EPA`s dose assessment model, more than 86% of the total dose received by the MEI was via the air immersion pathway.
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Jacobson, K.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Total effective dose equivalent associated with fixed uranium surface contamination

Description: This report provides the technical basis for establishing a uranium fixed-contamination action level, a fixed uranium surface contamination level exceeding the total radioactivity values of Appendix D of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, part 835 (10CFR835), but below which the monitoring, posting, and control requirements for Radiological Areas are not required for the area of the contamination. An area of fixed uranium contamination between 1,000 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} and that level corresponding to an annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) of 100 mrem requires only routine monitoring, posting to alert personnel of the contamination, and administrative control. The more extensive requirements for monitoring, posting, and control designated by 10CFR835 for Radiological Areas do not have to be applied for these intermediate fixed-contamination levels.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Bogard, J.S.; Hamm, R.N.; Ashley, J.C.; Turner, J.E.; England, C.A.; Swenson, D.E. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

External exposure to radionuclides in air, water, and soil

Description: Federal Guidance Report No. 12 tabulates dose coefficients for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides distributed in air, water, and soil. The dose coefficients are intended for use by Federal Agencies in calculating the dose equivalent to organs and tissues of the body.
Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: Eckerman, K.F. & Ryman, J.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

U.S. Department of Energy Report 1997 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions

Description: Presented is the Laboratory-wide certified report regarding radioactive effluents released into the air by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 1997. This information is required under the Clean Air Act and is being reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to an offsite member of the public was calculated using procedures specified by the EPA and described in this report. For 1997, the dose was 3.51 mrem. Airborne effluents from a 1mA, 800 MeV proton accelerator contributed to over 90% of the EDE; more than 86% of the total dose contribution was through the air immersion pathway.
Date: September 1, 1998
Creator: Jacobson, K.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LLNL NESHAP's 1999 Annual Report

Description: This annual report is prepared pursuant to the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart H; Subpart H governs radionuclide emissions to air from Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. NESHAPs limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent (EDE) of 10 mrem (100 {micro}Sv) to any member of the public. The EDEs for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site-wide maximally exposed members of the public from 1999 operations are summarized.
Date: June 1, 2000
Creator: Gallegos, G.; Biermann, A.H.; Harrach, R.J.; Bertoldo, N.A.; Berger, R.L. & Surano,K.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Notice of Construction for Tank Waste Remediation System Vadose Zone Characterization

Description: The following description and any attachments and references are provided to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH), Division of Radiation Protection, Air Emissions and Defense Waste Section as a notice of construction (NOC) in accordance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247, Radiation Protection-Air Emissions. The WAC 246-247-060, ''Applications, registration, and licensing'', states ''This section describes the information requirements for approval to construct, modify, and operate an emission unit. Any NOC requires the submittal of information listed in Appendix A.'' Appendix A (WAC 246-247-1 10) lists the requirements that must be addressed. The original NOC was submitted in May of 1999 as DOm-99-34. Additionally, the following description, attachments and references are provided to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an NOC, in accordance with Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants.'' The information required for submittal to the EPA is specified in 40 CFR 61.07. The potential emissions from this activity are estimated to provide less than 0.1 milliredyear total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to the hypothetical offsite maximally exposed individual (MEI), and commencement is needed within a short time frame. Therefore, this application is also intended to provide notification of the anticipated date of initial start-up in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(1), and it is requested that approval of this application will also constitute EPA acceptance of this initial start-up notification. Written notification of the actual date of initial startup, in accordance with the requirement listed in 40 CFR 61.09(a)(2) will be provided at a later date. This NOC covers the activities associated with vadose zone characterization within the Single-Shell Tank Farms located in the 200-East and 200-West Areas of the Hanford Site. Vadose zone characterization activities include the drilling and sampling of soil from ...
Date: April 20, 2000
Creator: HILL, J.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS (NESHAP) SUBPART H RADIONUCLIDES POTENTIAL TO EMIT CALCULATIONS

Description: This document provides an update of the status of stacks on the Hanford Site and the potential radionuclide emissions, i.e., emissions that could occur with no control devices in place. This review shows the calculations that determined whether the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) received by the maximum public receptor as a result of potential emissions from any one of these stacks would exceed 0.1 millirem/year. Such stacks require continuous monitoring of the effluent, or other monitoring, to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative code (WAC) 246-247-035(1)(a)(ii) and WAC 246-247-075(1), -(2), and -(6). This revised update reviews the potential-to-emit (PTE) calculations of 31 stacks for Fluor Hanford, Inc. Of those 31 stacks, 11 have the potential to cause a TEDE greater than 0.1 mrem/year.
Date: July 23, 2008
Creator: JN, EARLEY
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Shielding calculations and verifications for the new Radiation Instrument Calibration Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory

Description: MCNP-4C1 was used to perform the shielding design for the new Central Health Physics Calibration Facility (CHPCF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The problem of shielding the facility was subdivided into three separate components: (1) Transmission; (2) Skyshine; and (3) Maze Streaming/ Transmission. When possible, actual measurements were taken to verify calculation results. The comparison of calculation versus measurement results shows excellent agreement for neutron calculations. For photon comparisons, calculations resulted in conservative estimates of the Effective Dose Equivalent (EDE) compared to measured results. This disagreement in the photon measurements versus calculations is most likely due to several conservative assumptions regarding shield density and composition. For example, reinforcing steel bars (Rebar) in the concrete shield walls were not included in the shield model.
Date: January 1, 2002
Creator: George, G. L. (Gerald L.); Olsher, R. H. (Richard H.) & Seagraves, D. T. (David T.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2009

Description: Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are handled and stored. These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40CFR61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2009, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]). These minor sources included more than 100 stack sources and one source of diffuse emissions. There were no unplanned emissions from the Berkeley Lab site. Emissions from minor sources (stacks and diffuse emissions) either were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building-specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA-approved computer code, CAP88-PC, to calculate the effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual (MEI). The effective dose equivalent from all sources at Berkeley Lab in 2009 is 7.0 x 10{sup -3} mrem/yr (7.0 x 10{sup -5} mSv/yr) to the MEI, well below the 10 mrem/yr (0.1 mSv/yr) dose standard. The location of the MEI is at the University of California (UC) Lawrence Hall of Science, a public science museum about 1500 ft (460 m) east of Berkeley Lab's Building 56. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent to persons living within 50 mi (80 km) of Berkeley Lab is 1.5 x 10{sup -1} person-rem (1.5 x 10{sup -3} person-Sv) attributable to the Lab's airborne emissions in 2009.
Date: June 1, 2010
Creator: Wahl, Linnea
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recommended ALIs and DACs for 10 CFR part 220: A consistent numerical set

Description: Appendix B to 10 CFR Part 20 contains numerical data for controlling the intake of radionuclides in the workplace or in the environment. These data, derived from the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), do not provide a numerically consistent basis for demonstrating compliance with the limitation on dose stated in the regulation. This situation is largely a consequence of the numerical procedures used by the ICRP which did not maintain, in a strict numerical sense, the hierarchial relationship among the radiation protection quantities. In this work recommended values of the quantities in Appendix B to CFR Part 20 are developed using the dose coefficients of the applicable ICRP publications and a numerical procedure which ensures that the tabulated quantities are numerically consistent.
Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: Eckerman, K.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dose estimates for the heavy concrete ratchet wall configuration

Description: The recalculation of the estimated doses due to a beam loss at a single point in the storage-ring system indicates that the redesigned shielding geometry, using heavy concrete for the ratchet walls, is generally adequate for the parameters of no local lead shielding and an operating current of 0.1 A. For operation at 0.3 A, additional local lead shielding of 8 cm of lead will assure that all doses outside the ratchet wall shield from a beam loss at a given point will be {lt} 1 mSv.
Date: September 1, 1988
Creator: Knott, M.J. & Moe, H.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison study of AXAIR89Q and AXAIRQ

Description: AXAIR89Q, the primary dose assessment code used at Savannah River Site to predict downwind doses following a short hypothetical atmospheric release, has been improved to incorporate many new features. The new version, AXAIRQ, contains the following improvements: inclusion of dry deposition and the ground shine pathway, 95% dose calculations at user-selected distances, availability of Pasquill-Briggs diffusion coefficients, and user- input mixing height. AXAIRQ can be executed in the same manner as AXAIR89Q by selecting certain inputs. This report shows the differences in committed effective dose equivalents when the new features are invoked for various hypothetical release scenarios.
Date: October 1, 1995
Creator: Simpkins, A.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

External exposure model used in the RESRAD code for various geometries of contaminated soil.

Description: An external exposure model based on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Federal Guidance Report No. 12 (FGR-12) dose conversion factors and the point kernel method has been developed for the residual radioactive (RESRAD) material guideline computer code. This model improves the external ground pathway dose estimation from that in earlier versions of the RESRAD code by extending FGR-12 data applicability to a wider range of source geometries. FGR-12 assumes that sources are infinite in lateral extent. In actual situations, soil contamination sources can have any depth, shape, cover, and size. A depth factor function was developed to express the attenuation of radionuclides by using regression analysis. Three independent, nuclei-specific parameters were determined by using the effective dose equivalent values from FGR-12. The depth factors derived with the new model were within 2% of the FGR-12 values for all depths for most of the radionuclides. A cover-and-depth factor function was derived on the basis of the depth factor function by considering both dose contribution and attenuation from different depths. The cover-and-depth factor was compared with FGR-12 computations for some representative radionuclides and source configurations. For thin cover thicknesses (1 cm), most of the values were within 2%; even for large cover thicknesses (5 to 15 cm), most of the values were within 10%. To further extend this model for actual geometries (finite irregular areas), area and shape factors were derived by using the point kernel method. These factors depend not only on the lateral extent of the contamination but also on source depth, cover thickness, and gamma energies. The area factor increases with source radius and approaches unity for source radii greater than 50 m. To test the integrity of FGR-12 data, effective dose equivalent values at the surface and four soil depths were compared with the Monte Carlo N-Particle ...
Date: November 18, 1998
Creator: Kamboj, S.; LePoire, D. J. & Yu, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of the potential impacts from tritium soil contamination in the CP-5 yard.

Description: Based on a review of available data, significant contributions to low-level tritium soil contamination in the CP-5 yard have been made by airborne tritium fallout and rainout from the CP-5 ventilation system stack. Based on the distribution of tritium in the yard, it is also likely that leaks in secondary system piping which lead to the cooling towers were a significant contributor to tritium in CP-5 yard subsurface soil. Based on the foregoing analysis, low-level tritium contamination will not prohibit the release of the yard for unrestricted use in the future. Worst case dose estimates based on very conservative assumptions indicate that a 25 rmem annual effective dose equivalent limit will not be exceeded under the most restrictive residential-use family farm scenario. Given the impermeable nature of the glacial till under CP-5, low-level concentrations of tritium may be occasionally detected in the deep well (3300 12D), but the peak concentration will not approach the levels calculated by RESRAD; however, continued monitoring of the deep well is recommended. To ensure that all sources of potential tritium release have been removed from the CP-5 complex, removal of tritiated water from each rod-out hole and an evaluation of the physical integrity of the rod-out holes is recommended. This will also allow for an evaluation of tritium concentrations in shallow groundwater under CP-5 by sampling groundwater that is currently being forced into the drain tile system. Additional surface and subsurface soil sampling and analysis will be required to determine the final release status of soils around the Building 330 complex relative to elevated concentrations of CS-137, CO-60,Co-57, and Eu-152 identified during the 1993 IT Corporation characterization. The potential radiological impact from isolated elevations of the latter radionuclides is relatively low and can be evaluated as part of the final status survey of outdoor areas ...
Date: December 21, 1998
Creator: Hysong, R. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dose measurements of bremsstrahlung-produced neutrons from thick targets at the Advanced Photon Source.

Description: Bremsstrahlung is produced in the Advanced Photon Source storage ring when the positron beam interacts with the storage-ring components or with the residual gas molecules in the storage-ring vacuum. This bremsstrahlung has an energy range of zero to 7.0 GeV, which is the maximum energy of the positron beam. Bremsstrahlung photons of sufficient high energy can interact with beamline components such as beam stops and collimators, generating neutrons of varying energies. This paper presents the results of simultaneous measurements, conducted at the Advanced Photon Source, of bremsstrahlung and the corresponding photoneutron production from thick targets of iron, copper, tungsten and lead, which allow one to correlate photoneutron dose rates from these metals as a function of bremsstrahlung power. The average photoneutron dose equivalent rates, normalized to the bremsstrahlung power, are measured as 2.7 {+-} 0.5 rem/h/W for iron, 3.2 {+-} 0.5 rem/h/W for copper, 3.9 {+-} 0.5 rem/h/W for tungsten, and 4.6 {+-} 0.8 rem/h/W for lead targets. These are measured at 80 cm lateral from the center of the targets, perpendicular to the photon beam direction.
Date: September 16, 1998
Creator: Job, P. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A technical study of TLD beta calibration factor for exposures to depleted uranium

Description: The beta calibration factor for converting light output (on reading a thermoluminescent dosimeter) to shallow dose equivalent has been reexamined through theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. The results support the previously determined value for contact with a depleted uranium slab but indicate that for many actual workplace situations, the contact value may be overly conservative.
Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Ashley, J.C.; Turner, J.E.; McMahan, K.L.; Souleyrette, M.L. & Bogard, R.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department