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Costs of Oil Dependence: A 2000 Update

Description: Oil dependence remains a potentially serious economic and strategic problem for the United States. This report updates previous estimates of the costs of oil dependence to the U.S. economy and introduces several methodological enhancements. Estimates of the costs to the U.S. economy of the oil market upheavals of the last 30 years are in the vicinity of $7 trillion, present value 1998 dollars, about as large as the sum total of payments on the national debt over the same period. Simply adding up historical costs in 1998 dollars without converting to present value results in a Base Case cost estimate of $3.4 trillion. Sensitivity analysis indicates that cost estimates are sensitive to key parameters. A lower bound estimate of $1.7 trillion and an upper bound of $7.1 trillion (not present value) indicate that the costs of oil dependence have been large under almost any plausible set of assumptions. These cost estimates do not include military, strategic or political costs associated with U.S. and world dependence on oil imports.
Date: May 17, 2000
Creator: Greene, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Do Photovoltaic Energy Systems Effect Residential Selling Prices? Results from a California Statewide Investigation.

Description: An increasing number of homes in the U.S. have sold with photovoltaic (PV) energy systems installed at the time of sale, yet relatively little research exists that provides estimates of the marginal impacts of those PV systems on home sale prices. This research analyzes a large dataset of California homes that sold from 2000 through mid-2009 with PV installed. We find strong evidence that homes with PV systems sold for a premium over comparable homes without PV systems during this time frame. Estimates for this premium expressed in dollars per watt of installed PV range, from roughly $4 to $6.4/watt across the full dataset, to approximately $2.3/watt for new homes, to more than $6/watt for existing homes. A number of ideas for further research are suggested.
Date: April 12, 2011
Creator: Hoen, Ben; Cappers, Pete; Wiser, Ryan & Thayer, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interactions between Energy Efficiency Programs funded under the Recovery Act and Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs

Description: Since the spring of 2009, billions of federal dollars have been allocated to state and local governments as grants for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects and programs. The scale of this American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) funding, focused on 'shovel-ready' projects to create and retain jobs, is unprecedented. Thousands of newly funded players - cities, counties, states, and tribes - and thousands of programs and projects are entering the existing landscape of energy efficiency programs for the first time or expanding their reach. The nation's experience base with energy efficiency is growing enormously, fed by federal dollars and driven by broader objectives than saving energy alone. State and local officials made countless choices in developing portfolios of ARRA-funded energy efficiency programs and deciding how their programs would relate to existing efficiency programs funded by utility customers. Those choices are worth examining as bellwethers of a future world where there may be multiple program administrators and funding sources in many states. What are the opportunities and challenges of this new environment? What short- and long-term impacts will this large, infusion of funds have on utility customer-funded programs; for example, on infrastructure for delivering energy efficiency services or on customer willingness to invest in energy efficiency? To what extent has the attribution of energy savings been a critical issue, especially where administrators of utility customer-funded energy efficiency programs have performance or shareholder incentives? Do the new ARRA-funded energy efficiency programs provide insights on roles or activities that are particularly well-suited to state and local program administrators vs. administrators or implementers of utility customer-funded programs? The answers could have important implications for the future of U.S. energy efficiency. This report focuses on a selected set of ARRA-funded energy efficiency programs administered by state energy offices: the State Energy Program (SEP) formula ...
Date: February 25, 2011
Creator: Goldman, Charles A.; Stuart, Elizabeth; Hoffman, Ian; Fuller, Merrian C. & Billingsley, Megan A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California

Description: An increasing number of homes in the U.S. have sold with photovoltaic (PV) energy systems installed at the time of sale, yet relatively little research exists that estimates the marginal impacts of those PV systems on home sale prices. A clearer understanding of these possible impacts might influence the decisions of homeowners considering the installation of a PV system, homebuyers considering the purchase of a home with PV already installed, and new home builders considering including PV as an optional or standard product on their homes. This research analyzes a large dataset of California homes that sold from 2000 through mid-2009 with PV installed. It finds strong evidence that homes with PV systems sold for a premium over comparable homes without PV systems during this time frame. Estimates for this premium expressed in dollars per watt of installed PV range, on average, from roughly $4 to $5.5/watt across a large number of hedonic and repeat sales model specifications and robustness tests. When expressed as a ratio of the sales price premium of PV to estimated annual energy cost savings associated with PV, an average ratio of 14:1 to 19:1 can be calculated; these results are consistent with those of the more-extensive existing literature on the impact of energy efficiency on sales prices. When the data are split among new and existing homes, however, PV system premiums are markedly affected. New homes with PV show premiums of $2.3-2.6/watt, while existing homes with PV show premiums of more than $6/watt. Reasons for this discrepancy are suggested, yet further research is warranted. A number of other areas where future research would be useful are also highlighted.
Date: April 19, 2011
Creator: Hoen, Ben; Cappers, Peter; Wiser, Ryan & Thayer, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pipeline Structural Health Monitoring Using Macro-fiber Composite Active Sensors

Description: The United States economy is heavily dependent upon a vast network of pipeline systems to transport and distribute the nation's energy resources. As this network of pipelines continues to age, monitoring and maintaining its structural integrity remains essential to the nation's energy interests. Numerous pipeline accidents over the past several years have resulted in hundreds of fatalities and billions of dollars in property damages. These accidents show that the current monitoring methods are not sufficient and leave a considerable margin for improvement. To avoid such catastrophes, more thorough methods are needed. As a solution, the research of this thesis proposes a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for pipeline networks. By implementing a SHM system with pipelines, their structural integrity can be continuously monitored, reducing the overall risks and costs associated with current methods. The proposed SHM system relies upon the deployment of macro-fiber composite (MFC) patches for the sensor array. Because MFC patches are flexible and resilient, they can be permanently mounted to the curved surface of a pipeline's main body. From this location, the MFC patches are used to monitor the structural integrity of the entire pipeline. Two damage detection techniques, guided wave and impedance methods, were implemented as part of the proposed SHM system. However, both techniques utilize the same MFC patches. This dual use of the MFC patches enables the proposed SHM system to require only a single sensor array. The presented Lamb wave methods demonstrated the ability to correctly identify and locate the presence of damage in the main body of the pipeline system, including simulated cracks and actual corrosion damage. The presented impedance methods demonstrated the ability to correctly identify and locate the presence of damage in the flanged joints of the pipeline system, including the loosening of bolts on the flanges. In addition to ...
Date: March 1, 2006
Creator: Thien, A.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

TRADITIONAL METALLURGY, NANOTECHNOLOGIES AND STRUCTURAL MATERIALS: A SORBY AWARD LECTURE

Description: Traditional metallurgical processes are among the many ''old fashion'' practices that use nanoparticles to control the behavior of materials. Many of these practices were developed long before microscopy could resolve nanoscale features, yet the practitioners learned to manipulate and control microstructural elements that they could neither see nor identify. Furthermore, these early practitioners used that control to modify microstructures and develop desired material properties. Centuries old colored glass, ancient high strength steels and medieval organ pipes derived many of their desirable features through control of nanoparticles in their microstructures. Henry Sorby was among the first to recognize that the properties of rocks, minerals, metals and organic materials were controlled by microstructure. However, Mr. Sorby was accused of the folly of trying to study mountains with a microscope. Although he could not resolve nanoscale microstructural features, Mr. Sorby's observations revolutionized the study of materials. The importance of nanoscale microstructural elements should be emphasized, however, because the present foundation for structural materials was built by manipulating those features. That foundation currently supports several multibillion dollar industries but is not generally considered when the nanomaterials revolution is discussed. This lecture demonstrates that using nanotechnologies to control the behavior of metallic materials is almost as old as the practice of metallurgy and that many of the emergent nanomaterials technologists are walking along pathways previously paved by traditional metallurgists.
Date: July 17, 2007
Creator: Louthan, M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Cost of Superconducting Magnets as a Function of Stored Energy and Design Magnetic Induction Times the Field Volume

Description: By various theorems one can relate the capital cost of superconducting magnets to the magnetic energy stored within that magnet. This is particularly true for magnet where the cost is dominated by the structure needed to carry the magnetic forces. One can also relate the cost of the magnet to the product of the magnetic induction and the field volume. The relationship used to estimate the cost the magnet is a function of the type of magnet it is. This paper updates the cost functions given in two papers that were published in the early 1990 s. The costs (escalated to 2007 dollars) of large numbers of LTS magnets are plotted against stored energy and magnetic field time field volume. Escalated costs for magnets built since the early 1990 s are added to the plots.
Date: August 27, 2007
Creator: Green, Mike; Green, M.A. & Strauss, B.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimating the Cost of Superconducting Magnets and the Refrigerators Needed to Keep Them Cold

Description: The cost of superconducting magnets and the refrigerators needed to keep them cold can be estimated if one knows the magnet stored energy and the amount of refrigeration needed. This report updates the cost data collected over 20 years ago by Strobridge and others. Early cost data has been inflated into 1991 dollars and data on newer superconducting magnets has been added to the old data. The cost of superconducting magnets has been correlated with stored energy and field-magnetic volume product. The cost of the helium refrigerator cold box and the compressors needed to keep the magnet cold can be correlated with the refrigeration generated at 4.5K. The annual cost of 4.5K refrigeration can be correlated with 4.5K refrigeration and electrical energy cost.
Date: June 1, 1991
Creator: Green, M. A.; Byrns, R. & St. Lorant, S. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin : Evaluating Wetland Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary using Hydroacoustic Telemetry Arrays to Estimate Movement, Survival, and Residence Times of Juvenile Salmonids, Volume XXII (22).

Description: Wetlands in the Columbia River estuary are actively being restored by reconnecting these habitats to the estuary, making more wetland habitats available to rearing and migrating juvenile salmon. Concurrently, thousands of acoustically tagged juvenile salmonids are released into the Columbia River to estimate their survival as they migrate through the estuary. Here, we develop a release-recapture model that makes use of these tagged fish to measure the success of wetland restoration projects in terms of their contribution to populations of juvenile salmon. Specifically, our model estimates the fraction of the population that enter the wetland, survival within the wetland, and the mean residence time of fish within the wetland. Furthermore, survival in mainstem Columbia River downstream of the wetland can be compared between fish that remained the mainstem and entered the wetland. These conditional survival estimates provide a means of testing whether the wetland improves the subsequent survival of juvenile salmon by fostering growth or improving their condition. Implementing such a study requires little additional cost because it takes advantage of fish already released to estimate survival through the estuary. Thus, such a study extracts the maximum information at minimum cost from research projects that typically cost millions of dollars annually.
Date: August 1, 2008
Creator: Perry, Russell W. & Skalski, John R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Climate uncertainty and implications for U.S. state-level risk assessment through 2050.

Description: Decisions for climate policy will need to take place in advance of climate science resolving all relevant uncertainties. Further, if the concern of policy is to reduce risk, then the best-estimate of climate change impacts may not be so important as the currently understood uncertainty associated with realizable conditions having high consequence. This study focuses on one of the most uncertain aspects of future climate change - precipitation - to understand the implications of uncertainty on risk and the near-term justification for interventions to mitigate the course of climate change. We show that the mean risk of damage to the economy from climate change, at the national level, is on the order of one trillion dollars over the next 40 years, with employment impacts of nearly 7 million labor-years. At a 1% exceedance-probability, the impact is over twice the mean-risk value. Impacts at the level of individual U.S. states are then typically in the multiple tens of billions dollar range with employment losses exceeding hundreds of thousands of labor-years. We used results of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report 4 (AR4) climate-model ensemble as the referent for climate uncertainty over the next 40 years, mapped the simulated weather hydrologically to the county level for determining the physical consequence to economic activity at the state level, and then performed a detailed, seventy-industry, analysis of economic impact among the interacting lower-48 states. We determined industry GDP and employment impacts at the state level, as well as interstate population migration, effect on personal income, and the consequences for the U.S. trade balance.
Date: October 1, 2009
Creator: Loose, Verne W.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Stamber, Kevin Louis; Kelic, Andjelka et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Reliability Improvement Program Planning Report for the SNAP 10A Space Nuclear Power Unit

Description: The estimated achieved reliability of SNAP 10A space nuclear power units will be relatively low at the timeof the first SNAPSHOT flight test in April 1963 and the existing R&D program does not provide a significant reliabiity growth thereafter. The total costs of an 8-satellite network using SNAP 10A units over a 5-year period has been approximated for the case where the total cost of a single satellite launched is 8 million dollars.
Date: March 14, 1961
Creator: Coombs, M.G.; C.K., Smith & Wilson, L.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New Berkeley Lab Report Tracks a Decade of PV Installed Cost Trends

Description: Installations of PV systems have been expanding at a rapid pace in recent years. In the United States, the market for PV is driven by national, state, and local government incentives, including upfront cash rebates, production-based incentives, requirements that electricity suppliers purchase a certain amount of solar energy, and Federal and state tax benefits. These programs are, in part, motivated by the popular appeal of solar energy and by the positive attributes of PV - e.g., modest environmental impacts, avoidance of fuel price risks, coincidence with peak electrical demand, and the location of PV at the point of use. Given the relatively high cost of PV, however, a key goal of these policies is to encourage cost reductions over time. Therefore, as policy incentives have become more significant and as PV deployment has accelerated, so too has the desire to track the installed cost of PV systems over time, by system characteristics, by system location, and by component. A new Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory report, 'Tracking the Sun: The Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the U.S. from 1998-2007', helps to fill this need by summarizing trends in the installed cost (i.e., the cost paid by the system owner) of grid-connected PV systems in the U.S. The report is based on an analysis of project-level cost data from nearly 37,000 residential and non-residential PV systems completed from 1998-2007 and installed on the utility-customer-side of the meter. These systems total 363 MW, equal to 76% of all grid-connected PV capacity installed in the U.S. through 2007, representing the most comprehensive data source available on the installed cost of PV in the United States. The data were obtained from administrators of PV incentive programs around the country, who typically collect installed cost data for systems receiving incentives. A total of 16 programs, spanning ...
Date: April 15, 2009
Creator: Barbose, Galen; Peterman, Carla & Wiser, Ryan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOE EPSCoR Initiative in Structural and computational Biology/Bioinformatics

Description: The overall goal of the DOE EPSCoR Initiative in Structural and Computational Biology was to enhance the competiveness of Vermont research in these scientific areas. To develop self-sustaining infrastructure, we increased the critical mass of faculty, developed shared resources that made junior researchers more competitive for federal research grants, implemented programs to train graduate and undergraduate students who participated in these research areas and provided seed money for research projects. During the time period funded by this DOE initiative: (1) four new faculty were recruited to the University of Vermont using DOE resources, three in Computational Biology and one in Structural Biology; (2) technical support was provided for the Computational and Structural Biology facilities; (3) twenty-two graduate students were directly funded by fellowships; (4) fifteen undergraduate students were supported during the summer; and (5) twenty-eight pilot projects were supported. Taken together these dollars resulted in a plethora of published papers, many in high profile journals in the fields and directly impacted competitive extramural funding based on structural or computational biology resulting in 49 million dollars awarded in grants (Appendix I), a 600% return on investment by DOE, the State and University.
Date: February 21, 2008
Creator: Wallace, Susan S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Genome sequences of two Phytophthora species responsible for Sudden Oak Death and Soybean Root Rot provide novel insights into their evolutionary origins and mechanisms of pathogenesis

Description: The approximately 60 species of Phytophthora are all destructive pathogens, causing rots of roots, stems, leaves and fruits of a wide range of agriculturally and ornamentally important plants (1). Some species, such as P. cinnamomi, P. parasitica and P. cactorum, each attack hundreds of different plant host species, whereas others are more restricted. Some of the crops where Phytophthora infections cause the greatest financial losses include potato, soybean, tomato, alfalfa, tobacco, peppers, cucurbits, pineapple, strawberry, raspberry and a wide range of perennial tree crops, especially citrus, avocado, almonds, walnuts, apples and cocoa, and they also heavily affect the ornamental, nursery and forestry industries. The economic damage overall to crops in the United States by Phytophthora species is estimated in the tens of billions of dollars, including the costs of control measures, and worldwide it is many times this amount (1). In the northern midwest of the U.S., P. sojae causes $200 million in annual losses to soybean alone, and worldwide causes around $1-2 billion in losses per year. P. infestans infections resulted in the Irish potato famine last century and continues to be a difficult and worsening problem for potato and tomato growers worldwide, with worldwide costs estimated at $5 billion per year.
Date: December 1, 2005
Creator: Tyler, Brett M.; Tripathi, Sucheta; Aerts, Andrea; Bensasson, Douda; Dehal, Paramvir; Dubchak, Inna et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Trainblazing with roadrunner

Description: In June 2008, a new supercomputer broke the petaflop/s performance barrier, more than doubling the computational performance of the next fastest machine on the TopSOO Supercomputing Sites list (http://topSOO.org).This computer, named Roadrunner, is the result of an intensive collaboration between IBM and Los Alamos National Laboratory, where it is now located. Aside from its performance, Roadrunner has two distinguishing characteristics: a very good power/performance ratio and a 'hybrid' computer architecture that mixes several types of processors. By November 2008, the traditionally-architected Jaguar computer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was neck-and-neck with Roadrunner in the performance race, but it requires almost 2.8 times the electric power of Roadrunner. This difference translates into millions of dollars per year in operating costs.
Date: January 1, 2009
Creator: Henning, Paul J & White, Andrew B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Driving Demand for Home Energy Improvements: Motivating residential customers to invest in comprehensive upgrades that eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy

Description: Policy makers and program designers in the U.S. and abroad are deeply concerned with the question of how to scale up energy efficiency to a level that is commensurate both to the scale of the energy and climate challenges we face, and to the potential for energy savings that has been touted for decades. When policy makers ask what energy efficiency can do, the answers usually revolve around the technical and economic potential of energy efficiency - they rarely hone in on the element of energy demand that matters most for changing energy usage in existing homes: the consumer. A growing literature is concerned with the behavioral underpinnings of energy consumption. We examine a narrower, related subject: How can millions of Americans be persuaded to divert valued time and resources into upgrading their homes to eliminate energy waste, avoid high utility bills, and spur the economy? With hundreds of millions of public dollars flowing into incentives, workforce training, and other initiatives to support comprehensive home energy improvements, it makes sense to review the history of these programs and begin gleaning best practices for encouraging comprehensive home energy improvements. Looking across 30 years of energy efficiency programs that targeted the residential market, many of the same issues that confronted past program administrators are relevant today: How do we cost-effectively motivate customers to take action? Who can we partner with to increase program participation? How do we get residential efficiency programs to scale? While there is no proven formula - and only limited success to date with reliably motivating large numbers of Americans to invest in comprehensive home energy improvements, especially if they are being asked to pay for a majority of the improvement costs - there is a rich and varied history of experiences that new programs can draw upon. Our ...
Date: September 20, 2010
Creator: Fuller, Merrian C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DETECTION OF UNAUTHORIZED CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT IN PIPELINE RIGHT-OF-WAYS

Description: Natural gas transmission companies mark the right-of-way areas where pipelines are buried with warning signs to prevent accidental third-party damage. Nevertheless, pipelines are sometimes damaged by third-party construction equipment. A single incident can be devastating, causing death and millions of dollars of property loss. This damage would be prevented if potentially hazardous construction equipment could be detected, identified, and an alert given before the pipeline was damaged. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) is developing a system to solve this problem by using an optical fiber as a distributed sensor and interrogating the fiber with an optical time domain reflectometer. Key issues are the ability to detect encroachment and the ability to discriminate among potentially hazardous and benign encroachments. The work performed in the second quarter of the project includes design of the instrument, selection of the key components, and beginning programming of the custom optical time domain reflectometer. Work included an assessment of two other approaches to measuring strain and vibrations in an extended optical fiber sensor.
Date: April 26, 2002
Creator: Huebler, James E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DETECTION OF UNAUTHORIZED CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT IN PIPELINE RIGHT-OF-WAYS

Description: Natural gas transmission companies mark the right-of-way areas where pipelines are buried with warning signs to prevent accidental third-party damage. Nevertheless, pipelines are sometimes damaged by third-party construction equipment. A single incident can be devastating, causing death and millions of dollars of property loss. This damage would be prevented if potentially hazardous construction equipment could be detected, identified, and an alert given before the pipeline was damaged. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) is developing a system to solve this problem by using an optical fiber as a distributed sensor and interrogating the fiber with a custom optical time domain reflectometer. Key issues are the ability to detect encroachment and the ability to discriminate among potentially hazardous and benign encroachments. The work performed in the 4th quarter of 2002 included fine-tuning and debugging of the custom Optical Time Domain Reflectometer being constructed for data collection and analysis. It also included installation of optical fibers at the test site along an operating pipeline.
Date: January 29, 2003
Creator: Huebler, James E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DETECTION OF UNAUTHORIZED CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT IN PIPELINE RIGHT-OF-WAYS

Description: Natural gas transmission companies mark the right-of-way areas where pipelines are buried with warning signs to prevent accidental third-party damage. Nevertheless, pipelines are sometimes damaged by third-party construction equipment. A single incident can be devastating, causing death and millions of dollars of property loss. This damage would be prevented if potentially hazardous construction equipment could be detected, identified, and an alert given before the pipeline was damaged. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) is developing a system to solve this problem by using an optical fiber as a distributed sensor and interrogating the fiber with a custom optical time domain reflectometer. Key issues are the ability to detect encroachment and the ability to discriminate among potentially hazardous and benign encroachments. The work performed in the third quarter of the project (2nd quarter of 2002) includes design and construction of the diode laser driver and high-speed detector electronics. Fine-tuning of the electronics is proceeding. A new test site along an operating pipeline has been obtained.
Date: October 30, 2002
Creator: Huebler, James E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary results of GODIVA-IV prompt burst modeling

Description: The dynamic computer model developed to simulate GODIVA-IV prompt bursts adequately predicts the magnitude of power bursts. Also, it demonstrates the characteristic features of prompt bursts in metal assemblies, such as the change in shape of power pulses and the ringing of fuel surfaces at the onset of inertial effects. The model will be used to test more sophisticated reactivity feedback coefficients and neutronic-hydrodynamic coupling schemes. It will also be used for a more detailed analysis of inertial effects.
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: Kimpland, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The ends of uncertainty: Air quality science and planning in Central California

Description: Air quality planning in Central California is complicated and controversial despite millions of dollars invested to improve scientific understanding. This research describes and critiques the use of photochemical air quality simulation modeling studies in planning to attain standards for ground-level ozone in the San Francisco Bay Area and the San Joaquin Valley during the 1990's. Data are gathered through documents and interviews with planners, modelers, and policy-makers at public agencies and with representatives from the regulated and environmental communities. Interactions amongst organizations are diagramed to identify significant nodes of interaction. Dominant policy coalitions are described through narratives distinguished by their uses of and responses to uncertainty, their exposures to risks, and their responses to the principles of conservatism, civil duty, and caution. Policy narratives are delineated using aggregated respondent statements to describe and understand advocacy coalitions. I found that models impacted the planning process significantly, but were used not purely for their scientific capabilities. Modeling results provided justification for decisions based on other constraints and political considerations. Uncertainties were utilized opportunistically by stakeholders instead of managed explicitly. Ultimately, the process supported the partisan views of those in control of the modeling. Based on these findings, as well as a review of model uncertainty analysis capabilities, I recommend modifying the planning process to allow for the development and incorporation of uncertainty information, while addressing the need for inclusive and meaningful public participation. By documenting an actual air quality planning process these findings provide insights about the potential for using new scientific information and understanding to achieve environmental goals, most notably the analysis of uncertainties in modeling applications. Concurrently, needed uncertainty information is identified and capabilities to produce it are assessed. Practices to facilitate incorporation of uncertainty information are suggested based on research findings, as well as theory from the literatures of ...
Date: September 2003
Creator: Fine, James
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Replacing chemicals in recycle mills with mechanical alternatives

Description: A high-intensity spark fired underwater decomposes a small amount of the water into hydroxyl radicals, which are strong oxidants. These are able to oxidize contaminants such as glue and wood pitch that enter paper recycling mills as a part of the incoming furnish and cost the industry several hundred million dollars. The sparking technique is safe, inexpensive, and is capable of treating large volumes of water, which makes it attractive for mill applications. Several mill trials were run. Sparking caused a decrease in the tack of the deposits in one case. Lower bleach use occurred in two other mills; sparking reduced the degree of ink reattachment to fiber. The payback for either application is attractive. Sparking induced deposition of contaminants in another mill, which is a positive development--if it can be controlled. The technique is also able to degas water and to oxidize odor-causing sulfur compounds. Although one unit has been purchased by a mill, second-order effects caused by the technology needs to be defined further before the technology can be broadly applied.
Date: July 1, 2002
Creator: Technology, Institute of Paper Science
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Field Test Evaluation of Conservation Retrofits of Low-Income, Single-Family Buildings in Wisconsin: Audit Field Test Implementation and Results

Description: This report describes the field test of a retrofit audit. The field test was performed during the winter of 1985-86 in four South Central Wisconsin counties. The purpose of the field test was to measure the energy savings and cost effectiveness of the audit-directed retrofit program for optimizing the programs benefit-to-cost ratio. The audit-directed retrofit program is described briefly in this report and in more detail by another report in this series (ORNL/CON-228/P3). The purpose of this report is to describe the methods and results of the field test. Average energy savings of the 20 retrofitted houses are likely (0.90 probability) to lie between 152 and 262 therms/year/house. The most likely value of the average savings is 207 therms/year/house. These savings are significantly (p < .05) smaller than the audit-predicted savings (286 therms/year/house). Measured savings of individual houses were significantly different than predicted savings for half of the houses. Each house received at least one retrofit. Thirteen of the 20 retrofitted houses received a new condensing furnace or blown-in wall insulation; all but two of the houses received one or more minor retrofits. The seven houses which received condensing furnaces saved, on average, about as much as predicted, but three of the seven houses had significantly more or less savings than predicted. The six houses which received wall insulation saved, on average, about half as much as predicted. The remaining houses which received only minor retrofits saved, on average, less than predicted, but the difference was not significant. Actual retrofit costs were close to expected costs. Overall measured energy savings averaged 15 therms/year per hundred retrofit dollars invested. Houses which received wall insulation or a condensing furnace did slightly better, and the houses which received only minor retrofits did poorly. When estimated program costs were included, average savings dropped to ...
Date: January 1, 1988
Creator: McCold, L.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DETECTION OF UNAUTHORIZED CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT IN PIPELINE RIGHT-OF-WAYS

Description: Natural gas transmission companies mark the right-of-way areas where pipelines are buried with warning signs to prevent accidental third-party damage. Nevertheless, pipelines are sometimes damaged by third-party construction equipment. A single incident can be devastating, causing death and millions of dollars of property loss. This damage would be prevented if potentially hazardous construction equipment could be detected, identified, and an alert given before the pipeline was damaged. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) is developing a system to solve this problem by using an optical fiber as a distributed sensor and interrogating the fiber with an custom optical time domain reflectometer. Key issues are the ability to detect encroachment and the ability to discriminate among potentially hazardous and benign encroachments. The work performed in the third quarter of the project (2nd quarter of 2002) includes design of the diode laser driver and high-speed detector electronics and programming of the custom optical time domain reflectometer.
Date: July 19, 2002
Creator: Huebler, James E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department