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Sonochemical Digestion of High-Fired Plutonium Dioxide Samples

Description: This work was performed as part of a broader effort to automate analytical methods for determining plutonium and other radioisotopes in environmental samples. The work described here represented a screening study to evaluate the effect of applying ultrasonic irradiation to dissolve high-fired plutonium oxide. The major findings of this work can be summarized as follows: (1) High-fired plutonium oxide does not undergo measurable dissolution when sonicated in nitric acid solutions, even at a high concentration range of nitric acid where the calculated thermodynamic solubility of plutonium oxide exceeds the ?g/mL level. (2) Applying organic complexants (nitrilotriacetic acid) and reductants (hydroxyurea) in 1.5 M nitric acid does not significantly increase the dissolution compared with digestion in nitric acid alone. Nearly all (99.5%) of the plutonium oxide remains undissolved under these conditions. (3) The action of a strong inorganic reductant, titanium trichloride in 25 wt% HCl, results in 40% dissolution of the plutonium oxide when the titanium trichloride concentration is ?1 wt% under sonication. (4) Oxidative treatment of plutonium oxide by freshly dissolved AgO ({approx}20 mg/mL) in 1.5 M nitric acid with sonication resulted in 95% plutonium oxide dissolution. However, the same treatment of plutonium oxide mechanically mixed with 50 mg of Columbia River sediment (CRS) results in a significant decrease of dissolution yield of plutonium oxide (<20% dissolved at the same AgO loading) because of parasitic consumption of AG(II) by oxidizable components of the CRS. (5) Digesting plutonium oxide in HF resulted in dissolution yields slightly higher than 80% for HF concentration from 6 M to 14 M. Sonication did not result in any improvement in dissolution efficiency in HF. (6) Mixed nitric acid/HF solutions result in a higher dissolution yield of plutonium oxide compared with digestion in HF alone (at the same HF concentrations). Practically quantitative dissolution of PuO2 can ...
Date: October 12, 2006
Creator: Sinkov, Sergei I. & Lumetta, Gregg J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Affinity functions for modeling glass dissolution rates

Description: Glass dissolution rates decrease dramatically as glasses approach "saturation" with respect to the leachate solution. This effect may lower the dissolution rate to 1/100 to 1/1000 of the unsaturated rate. Although rate controls on glass dissolution are best understood for conditions far from saturation, most repository sites are chosen where water fluxes are minimal, and therefore the waste glass is most likely to dissolve under conditions close to saturation. Our understanding of controls on dissolution rates close to saturation, versus far from saturation, are therefore of greater significance for assessing release rates of radionuclides from repositories. The key term in the rate expression used to predict glass dissolution rates close to saturation is the affinity term, which accounts for saturation effects on dissolution rates. The form of the affinity term and parameters used to model glass dissolution are clearly critical for accurate estimates of glass performance in a repository. The concept of saturation with respect to glass dissolution is problematic because of the thermodynamically unstable nature of glass. Saturation implies similar rates of forward (dissolution) and back (precipitation) reactions, but glasses cannot precipitate from aqueous solutions; there can be no back reaction to form glass. However experiments have shown that glasses do exhibit saturation effects when dissolving, analogous to saturation effects observed for thermodynamically stable materials. Attempts to model the glass dissolution process have therefore employed theories and rate equations more commonly used to model dissolution of crystalline solids, as described below
Date: July 8, 1998
Creator: Bourcier, W L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Method for dissolving delta-phase plutonium

Description: A process for dissolving plutonium, and in particular, delta-phase plutonium. The process includes heating a mixture of nitric acid, hydroxylammonium nitrate and potassium fluoride (HAN) to a temperature between 40 and 70 C, then immersing the metal in the mixture. Preferably, the nitric acid has a concentration of not ore than 2M, the HAN approximately 0.66M, and the potassium fluoride 1M. Additionally, a small amount of sulfamic acid, such as 0.1M can be added to assure stability of the HAN in the presence of nitric acid. The oxide layer that forms on plutonium metal may be removed with a non-oxidizing acid as a pre-treatment step.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Karraker, D.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gas Releases During Saltcake Dissolution for Retrieval of Single-Shell Tank Waste, Rev. 1

Description: It is possible to retrieve a large fraction of soluble waste from the Hanford single-shell waste tanks (SSTs) by dissolving it with water. This retrieval method will be demonstrated in Tanks U-107 and S-112 in the next few years. If saltcake dissolution proves practical and effective, many of the saltcake SSTs may be retrieved by this method. Many of the SSTs retain flammable gas that will be released into the tank headspace as the waste dissolves. This report describes the physical processes that control dissolution and gas release. Calculation results are shown and describe how the headspace hydrogen concentration evolves during dissolution. The observed spontaneous and induced gas releases from SSTs are summarized, and the dissolution of the crust layer in SY-101 is discussed as a recent example of full-scale dissolution of saltcake containing a large volume of retained gas. The report concludes that the dissolution rate is self-limiting and that gas release rates are relatively low.
Date: December 28, 2001
Creator: Stewart, Charles W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of the Characterization and Dissolution Tests of Samples from Tank 16H

Description: Samples from Tank 16H annulus and one sample from the tank interior were characterized to provide a source term for use in fate and transport modeling. Four of the annulus samples appeared to be similar based on visual examination and were combined to form a composite. One of the annulus samples appeared to be different from the other four based on visual examination and was analyzed separately. The analytical results of the tank interior sample indicate the sample is composed predominantly of iron containing compounds. Both of the annulus samples are composed mainly of sodium salts, however, the composite sample contained significantly more sludge/sand material of low solublitity. The characterization of the tank 16H annulus and tank interior samples was hampered by the high dose rate and the nature of the samples. The difficulties resulted in large uncertainties in the analytical data. The large uncertainties coupled with the number of important species below detection limits indicate the need for reanalysis of the Tank 16H samples as funding becomes available. Recommendations on potential remedies for these difficulties are provided. In general, none of the reagents appeared to be effective in dissolving the composite sample even after two contacts at elevated temperature. In contrast to the composite sample, all of the reagents dissolved a large percentage of the HTF-087 solids after two contacts at ambient temperature.
Date: March 31, 1999
Creator: Hay, M.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reactive Spreading of a Lead-Free Solder on Alumina

Description: The wetting of Sn3Ag-based alloys on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been studied using the sessile-drop configuration. Small additions of Ti decrease the contact angle of Sn3Ag alloys on alumina from 115 to 23 degrees. Adsorption of Ti-species at the solid-liquid interface prior to reaction is the driving force for the observed decrease in contact angle, and the spreading kinetics is controlled by the kinetics of Ti dissolution into the molten alloy. The addition of Ti increases the transport rates at the solid-liquid interface, resulting in the formation of triple-line ridges that pin the liquid front and promote a wide variability in the final contact angles.
Date: December 1, 2005
Creator: Gremillard, L.; Saiz, E.; Radmilovic, V.R. & Tomsia, A.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gas Releases During Saltcake Dissolution for Retrieval of Single-Shell Tank Waste

Description: It is possible to retrieve a large fraction of soluble waste from the Hanford single-shell waste tanks (SST) by dissolving it with water. This retrieval method will be demonstrated in U-107 and S-112 in the next few years. If saltcake dissolution proves practical and effective, many of the saltcake SSTs may be retrieved by this method. Many of the SSTs retain a large volume of flammable gas that will be released into the tank headspace as the waste dissolves. This report describes the physical processes that control dissolution and gas release. Calculation results are shown describing the headspace hydrogen concentration transient during dissolution. The observed spontaneous and induced gas releases from SSTs is summarized and the dissolution of the crust layer in SY-101 is discussed as a recent example of full-scale dissolution of saltcake containing a very large volume of retained gas. The report concludes that the dissolution rate is self limiting and gas release rates are relatively low.
Date: July 31, 2001
Creator: Stewart, Charles W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FLOWSHEET EVALUATION FOR THE DISSOLVING AND NEUTRALIZATION OF SODIUM REACTOR EXPERIMENT USED NUCLEAR FUEL

Description: This report includes the literature review, hydrogen off-gas calculations, and hydrogen generation tests to determine that H-Canyon can safely dissolve the Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE; thorium fuel), Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR; aluminum alloy fuel), and Denmark Reactor (DR-3; silicide fuel, aluminum alloy fuel, and aluminum oxide fuel) assemblies in the L-Bundles with respect to the hydrogen levels in the projected peak off-gas rates. This is provided that the number of L-Bundles charged to the dissolver is controlled. Examination of SRE dissolution for potential issues has aided in predicting the optimal batching scenario. The calculations detailed in this report demonstrate that the FNR, SRE, and DR-3 used nuclear fuel (UNF) are bounded by MURR UNF and may be charged using the controls outlined for MURR dissolution in a prior report.
Date: October 30, 2012
Creator: Daniel, W. E.; Hansen, E. K. & Shehee, T. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nylon Dissolution in Nitric Acid Solutions

Description: H Area Operations is planning to process Pu-contaminated uranium scrap in support of de-inventory efforts. Nylon bags will be used to hold materials to be dissolved in H-Canyon. Based on this set of twelve nylon dissolutions, it is concluded that (when other variables are held constant): increased acid concentration results in increased dissolution rates; increased acid concentration results in a lower dissolution onset temperature; little, if any, H plus is consumed during the depolymerization process; and 2.0-3.0 M HNO3, with 0.025 M KF and 2 g/L B, is satisfactory for the dissolution of nylon bag materials to be used during H-Canyon processing.
Date: June 16, 2004
Creator: KESSINGER, GLENF.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A model for reaction-assisted polymer dissolution in LIGA.

Description: A new chemically-oriented mathematical model for the development step of the LIGA process is presented. The key assumption is that the developer can react with the polymeric resist material in order to increase the solubility of the latter, thereby partially overcoming the need to reduce the polymer size. The ease with which this reaction takes place is assumed to be determined by the number of side chain scissions that occur during the x-ray exposure phase of the process. The dynamics of the dissolution process are simulated by solving the reaction-diffusion equations for this three-component, two-phase system, the three species being the unreacted and reacted polymers and the solvent. The mass fluxes are described by the multicomponent diffusion (Stefan-Maxwell) equations, and the chemical potentials are assumed to be given by the Flory-Huggins theory. Sample calculations are used to determine the dependence of the dissolution rate on key system parameters such as the reaction rate constant, polymer size, solid-phase diffusivity, and Flory-Huggins interaction parameters. A simple photochemistry model is used to relate the reaction rate constant and the polymer size to the absorbed x-ray dose. The resulting formula for the dissolution rate as a function of dose and temperature is ?t to an extensive experimental data base in order to evaluate a set of unknown global parameters. The results suggest that reaction-assisted dissolution is very important at low doses and low temperatures, the solubility of the unreacted polymer being too small for it to be dissolved at an appreciable rate. However, at high doses or at higher temperatures, the solubility is such that the reaction is no longer needed, and dissolution can take place via the conventional route. These results provide an explanation for the observed dependences of both the dissolution rate and its activation energy on the absorbed dose.
Date: May 1, 2004
Creator: Larson, Richard S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Canyon dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible residues

Description: An alternative to the FB-Line scrap recovery dissolver was desired for the dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible (SS{ampersand}C) residues from the plutonium reduction process due to the potential generation of hydrogen gas concentrations above the lower flammability limit. To address this concern, a flowsheet was developed for the F-Canyon dissolvers. The dissolvers are continually purged with nominally 33 SCFM of air; therefore the generation of flammable gas concentrations should not be a concern. Following removal of crucible fragments, small batches of the remaining sand fines or slag chunks containing less than approximately 350 grams of plutonium can be dissolved using the center insert in each of the four annular dissolver ports to address nuclear criticality safety concerns. Complete dissolution of the sand fines and slag chunks was achieved in laboratory experiments by heating between 75 and 85 degrees Celsius in a 9.3M nitric acid/0.013M (hydrogen) fluoride solution. Under these conditions, the sand and slag samples dissolved between 1 and 3 hours. Complete dissolution of plutonium and calcium fluorides in the slag required adjusting the dissolver solution to 7.5 wt% aluminum nitrate nonahydrate (ANN). Once ANN was added to a dissolver solution, further dissolution of any plutonium oxide (PuO2) in successive charges was not practical due to complexation of the fluoride by aluminum. During the laboratory experiments, well mixed solutions were necessary to achieve rapid dissolution rates. When agitation was not provided, sand fines dissolved very slowly. Measurement of the hydrogen gas generation rate during dissolution of slag samples was used to estimate the amount of metal in the chunks. Depending upon the yield of the reduction, the values ranged between approximately 1 (good yield) and 20% (poor yield). Aging of the slag will reduce the potential for hydrogen generation as calcium metal oxidizes over time. The potential for excessive ...
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Rudisill, T.S.; Gray, J.H.; Karraker, D.G. & Chandler, G.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flowsheet modifications for dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible residues in the F-canyon dissolvers

Description: An initial flowsheet for the dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible (SS{ampersand}C) was developed for the F- Canyon dissolvers as an alternative to dissolution in FB-Line. In that flowsheet, the sand fines were separated from the slag chunks and crucible fragments. Those two SS{ampersand}C streams were packaged separately in mild-steel cans for dissolution in the 6.4D dissolver. Nuclear safety constraints limited the dissolver charge to approximately 350 grams of plutonium in two of the three wells of the dissolver insert and required 0.23M (molar) boron as a soluble neutron poison in the 9.3M nitric acid/0.013M fluoride dissolver solution. During the first dissolution of SS{ampersand}C fines, it became apparent that a significant amount of the plutonium charged to the 6.4D dissolver did not dissolve in the time predicted by previous laboratory experiments. The extended dissolution time was attributed to fluoride complexation by boron. An extensive research and development (R{ampersand}D) program was initiated to investigate the dissolution chemistry and the physical configuration of the dissolver insert to understand what flowsheet modifications were needed to achieve a viable dissolution process.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Rudisill, T.S.; Karraker, D.G. & Graham, F.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plutonium dissolution process

Description: A two-step process for dissolving Pu metal is disclosed in which two steps can be carried out sequentially or simultaneously. Pu metal is exposed to a first mixture of 1.0-1.67 M sulfamic acid and 0.0025-0.1 M fluoride, the mixture having been heated to 45-70 C. The mixture will dissolve a first portion of the Pu metal but leave a portion of the Pu in an oxide residue. Then, a mineral acid and additional fluoride are added to dissolve the residue. Alternatively, nitric acid between 0.05 and 0.067 M is added to the first mixture to dissolve the residue as it is produced. Hydrogen released during the dissolution is diluted with nitrogen.
Date: January 1, 1994
Creator: Vest, M.A.; Fink, S.D.; Karraker, D.G.; Moore, E.N. & Holcomb, H.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gas Releases During Saltcake Dissolution for Retrieval of Single-Shell Tank Waste

Description: It is possible to retrieve a large fraction of soluble waste from the Hanford single-shell waste tanks (SST) by dissolving it with water. This retrieval method will be demonstrated in U-107 and S-112 in the next few years. If saltcake dissolution proves practical and effective, many of the saltcake SSTs may be retrieved by this method. Many of the SSTs retain a large volume of flammable gas that will be released into the tank headspace as the waste dissolves. This report describes the physical processes that control dissolution and gas release. Calculation results are shown describing the headspace hydrogen concentration transient during dissolution. The observed spontaneous and induced gas releases from SSTs is summarized and the dissolution of the crust layer in SY-101 is discussed as a recent example of full-scale dissolution of saltcake containing a very large volume of retained gas. The report concludes that the dissolution rate is self limiting and gas release rates are relatively low.
Date: July 31, 2001
Creator: Stewart, Charles W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alkali Treatment of Acidic Solution from Hanford K Basin Sludge Dissolution

Description: Nitric acid solutions will be created from the dissolution of Hanford K Basin sludge. These acidic dissolver solutions must be made alkaline by treatment with NaOH solution before they are disposed to ~ the Tank Waste Remediation System on the Hanford Site. During the alkali treatments, sodium diuranate, hydroxides of iron and aluminum, and radioelements (uranium, plutonium, and americium) will precipitate from the dissolver solution. Laboratory tests, discussed here, were pefiormed to provide information on these precipitates and their precipitation behavior that is important in designing the engineering flowsheet for the treatment process. Specifically, experiments were conducted to determine the optimum precipitation conditions; the completeness of uranium, plutonium, and americium precipitation; the rate of sedimentation; and the physico-chemical characteristics of the solids formed by alkali treatment of simulated acidic dissolver solutions. These experiments also determined the redistribution of uranium, plutonium, and americium flom the sodium di~ate and iron and al&inurn hydroxide precipitates upon contact with carbonate- and EDTA-bearing simulated waste solutions. Note: EDTA is the tetrasodium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetate.
Date: December 22, 1998
Creator: Bessonov, A. A.; Yusov, A. B.; Fedoseev, A. M.; Gelis, A. V.; Garnov, A. Y.; Delegard, C. H. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reactions and Interfacial Behaviors of the Water–Amorphous Silica System from Classical and Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations

Description: Due to the wide application of silica based systems ranging from microelectronics to nuclear waste disposal, detailed knowledge of water-silica interactions plays an important role in understanding fundamental processes, such as glass corrosion and the long term reliability of devices. In this dissertation, atomistic computer simulation methods have been used to explore and identify the mechanisms of water-silica reactions and the detailed processes that control the properties of the water-silica interfaces due to their ability to provide atomic level details of the structure and reaction pathways. The main challenges of the amorphous nature of the silica based systems and nano-porosity of the structures were overcome by a combination of simulation methodologies based on classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with Reactive Force Field (ReaxFF) and density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio MD simulations. Through the development of nanoporous amorphous silica structure models, the interactions between water and the complex unhydroxylated internal surfaces identified the unusual stability of strained siloxane bonds in high energy ring structure defects, as well as the hydroxylation reaction kinetics, which suggests the difficulty in using DFT methods to simulate Si-O bond breakage with reasonable efficiency. Another important problem addressed is the development of silica gel structures and their interfaces, which is considered to control the long term residual dissolution rate in borosilicate glasses. Through application of the ReaxFF classical MD potential, silica gel structures which mimic the development of interfacial layers during silica dissolution were created A structural model, consisting of dense silica, silica gel, and bulk water, and the related interfaces was generated, to represent the dissolution gel structure. High temperature evolution of the silica-gel-water (SGW) structure was performed through classical MD simulation of the system, and growth of the gel into the water region occurred, as well as the formation of intermediate range structural ...
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Date: May 2016
Creator: Rimsza, Jessica M
Partner: UNT Libraries

Dissolution studies of plutonium oxide in LaBS glass

Description: As part of international agreement between the United States and Russia, a significant amount of plutonium requires disposition. One of the disposition paths is to immobilize it and dispose of it in a geological repository. The two favored immobilization forms are glass and ceramic. The plutonium, as an oxide, would be reacted with the glass or ceramic to form a homogeneousmaterial. The resulting solid product would then be encased in High-Level Waste (1-ILW)glass for the can-in-canister option. The HLW glass gives a radiation barrier to increase proliferation resistance. The glass canister would then be disposed of by geological emplacement. This paper discusses how glass meets two criteria: the condition of significant actinide volubility, and That the PuO{sub 2} feed should be incorporated into the matrix without significant amount of unreacted material.
Date: May 5, 1997
Creator: Riley, D.; Bourcier, W.; Vienna, J.; Meaker, T.; Peeler, D. & Maffa, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The effect of CO2(aq), Al(aq) and temperature on feldspar dissolution

Description: The authors measured labradorite (Ca{sub 0.6}Na{sub 0.4}Al{sub 1.6}Si{sub 2.4}O{sub 8}) dissolution rates using a mixed flow reactor from 30 to 130 C as a function of CO{sub 2} (3 x 10{sup -3} and 0.6 M), and aluminum (10{sup -6} to 10{sup -3}M) at pH 3.2. Over these conditions, labradorite dissolution can be described with a single rate expression that accounts for observed increases in dissolution rate with temperature and decreases in dissolution rate with dissolved aluminum: Rate{sub Si} (mol Labradorite cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) = k{double_prime} x 10{sup -Ea/2.303RT} [(a{sub H{sup +}}{sup 3n}/a{sub Al{sup 3+}}{sup n})K{sub T}/(1+K{sub T} (a{sub H{sup +}}{sup 3n}/a{sub Al{sup 3+}}{sup n}))] where the apparent dissolution rate constant, k{double_prime} = 10{sup -5.69} (mol Labradorite cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}); the net activation energy, E{sub a} = 10.06 (kcal mol{sup -1}); H{sup +}-Al{sup 3+} exchange coefficient, n = 0.31; and silica rich surface complex formation constant K{sub T} = 4.5 to 5.6 from 30 to 130 C. The effect of CO{sub 2}(aq) on mineral dissolution is accounted for by changes in solution pH. At temperatures below 60 C, labradorite dissolves incongruently with preferential dissolution of Na, Ca and Al over Si.
Date: October 14, 2003
Creator: Carroll, S & Knauss, K
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

REDUCING ULTRA-CLEAN TRANSPORTATION FUEL COSTS WITH HYMELT HYDROGEN

Description: This report describes activities for the sixth quarter of work performed under this agreement. MEFOS conducted a third round of atmospheric testing as scheduled on December 9 through December 12, 2003. We reported experimental activities of this testing last quarter. We report process calculations and results this quarter. The test results demonstrated a much-improved rate of carbon dissolution with gas yields close to thermodynamic equilibrium at nearly doubled feed rates of September testing and a commercially viable feed and oxygen injection technique. Additional super-atmospheric testing to perform the last task in the MEFOS experimental program is scheduled for the last quarter of 2004.
Date: April 1, 2004
Creator: Malone, Donald P. & Renner, William R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

REDUCING ULTRA-CLEAN TRANSPORTATION FUEL COSTS WITH HYMELT HYDROGEN

Description: This report describes activities for the fourth quarter of work performed under this agreement. A second round of atmospheric testing was conducted as scheduled on September 2 through September 4, 2003. The test results demonstrated a much-improved rate of carbon dissolution with gas yields close to expectations. Additional atmospheric testing to demonstrate a commercially feasible feed and oxygen injection method is scheduled for the week of December 8, 2003.
Date: October 31, 2003
Creator: Malone, Donald P. & Renner, William R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

REDUCING ULTRA-CLEAN TRANSPORTATION FUEL COSTS WITH HYMELT HYDROGEN

Description: This report describes activities for the fifth quarter of work performed under this agreement. A third round of atmospheric testing was conducted as scheduled on December 9 through December 12, 2003. The test results demonstrated a much-improved rate of carbon dissolution with gas yields close to thermodynamic equilibrium at nearly doubled feed rates of September testing and a commercially viable feed and oxygen injection technique. Additional super-atmospheric testing to perform the last task in the MEFOS experimental program is scheduled for the week of August 2004.
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Malone, Donald P. & Renner, William R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison of the results of short-term static tests and single-pass flow-through tests with LRM glass.

Description: Static dissolution tests were conducted to measure the forward dissolution rate of LRM glass at 70 C and pH(RT) 11.7 {+-} 0.1 for comparison with the rate measured with single-pass flow-through (SPFT) tests in an interlaboratory study (ILS). The static tests were conducted with monolithic specimens having known geometric surface areas, whereas the SPFT tests were conducted with crushed glass that had an uncertain specific surface area. The error in the specific surface area of the crushed glass used in the SPFT tests, which was calculated by modeling the particles as spheres, was assessed based on the difference in the forward dissolution rates measured with the two test methods. Three series of static tests were conducted at 70 C following ASTM standard test method C1220 using specimens with surfaces polished to 600, 800, and 1200 grit and a leachant solution having the same composition as that used in the ILS. Regression of the combined results of the static tests to the affinity-based glass dissolution model gives a forward rate of 1.67 g/(m{sup 2}d). The mean value of the forward rate from the SPFT tests was 1.64 g/(m{sup 2}d) with an extended uncertainty of 1.90 g/(m{sup 2}d). This indicates that the calculated surface area for the crushed glass used in the SPFT tests is less than 2% higher than the actual surface area, which is well within the experimental uncertainties of measuring the forward dissolution rate using each test method. These results indicate that the geometric surface area of crushed glass calculated based on the size of the sieves used to isolate the fraction used in a test is reliable. In addition, the C1220 test method provides a means for measuring the forward dissolution rate of borosilicate glasses that is faster, easier, and more economical than the SPFT test method.
Date: January 29, 2007
Creator: Ebert, W. L. & Engineering, Chemical
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department