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Combined in-situ dilatometer and contact angle studies of interfacial reaction kinetics in brazing.

Description: Multi-component dissimilar material braze joints as shown in Figure 1 consisting of dissimilar base materials, filler materials and wetting agents are of tantamount importance in a wide variely of applications. This work combines dilatometry and contact angle measurements to characterize in-situ the multiple interfacial reaction pathways that occur in such systems. Whereas both of these methods are commonly used tools in metallurgical investigation, their combined use within the context of brazing studies is new and offers considerable additional insight. Applications are discussed to joints made between Beryllium and Monel with TiH{sub 2} as the wetting agent and Cu-28%Ag as the filler material.
Date: January 1, 2001
Creator: Dave, V. R. (Vivek R.); Javernick, D. A. (Daniel A.); Thoma, D. J. (Dan J.); Cola, M. J. (Mark J.); Hollis, K. J. (Kendall J.); Smith, F. M. (Frank M.) et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dilatometry in the Gleeble: What did you really measure?

Description: The Gleeble is an oft-used tool for welding metallurgy research. Besides producing synthetic weld specimens, it is used to determine phase transformation temperatures and kinetics via dilatometry. Experimental data and an FEM model are used to examine measured dilatation errors because of non-uniform heating of the dilatometer and other sources such as sample elastic and plastic deformation. Both isothermal and constant heating/cooling rate scenarios are considered. Further errors which may be introduced when the dilatation is incorrectly assumed to be linearly related to the volume fraction transformed are also discussed.
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Knorovsky, G.A.; Robino, C.V.; Dykhuizen, R.C. & MacCallum, D.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evidence of Transformation Bursts During Thermal Cycling of a Pu-Ga Alloy

Description: The thermodynamics and kinetics of the fcc (delta) to monoclinic (alpha-prime) phase transformation and its reversion in a plutonium-gallium alloy have been studied using differential scanning calorimetry, resistometry, and dilatometry. Under ambient conditions, the delta phase is metastable in a Pu-2.0 at% Ga alloy. Thermal cycling to below the ambient temperature results in a partial transformation to the alpha-prime phase; this transformation is composition-invariant and exhibits martensitic behavior. Because this transformation results in an unusually invariant large 25% volume contraction that cannot be fully accommodated by purely elastic adjustments, the transformation mode is expected to involve burst formation of individual alpha-prime particles. However, upon cooling, these individual bursts were not resolved by the above techniques, although signals corresponding to the overall accumulation of many alpha-prime particles were observed. On the other hand, upon heating, signals from differential scanning calorimetry, resistometry, and dilatometry showed a series of discrete changes occurring in periodic increments beginning at approximately 32 C. These features correspond to the cooperative reversion of many alpha-prime particles to the delta phase; they appear to be the result of an interplay between the autocatalytically driven reversion of a cascade of individual martensite units, and self-quenching caused by small changes of temperature and/or stress accompanying each individual transformation burst. The heat of the delta/alpha-prime transformation is estimated to be about + 4 kJ/mole.
Date: February 9, 2005
Creator: Blobaum, K M; Krenn, C R; Mitchell, J N; Haslam, J J; Wall, M A; Massalski, T B et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computer-operated quartz differential dilatometer

Description: From international symposium on thermal expansion of solids; Lake of the Czarks, Missouri, USA (7 Nov 1973). A quartz differential dilatometer was interfaced with a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-8 computer to automatically measure the thermal expansion of solids from 300 to 1000 K. A Carson-Dice Electronic-Mechanicai Micrometer, readable to 2.5 x 10/sup -6/ cm, was employed for length-change measurements accurate to 2.5 x 10/sup -5/ cm. Calibrated Pt/Pt/ sub 90/Rh/sub 10/ thermocouples were used to measure temperature changes to plus or minus 0.22 K. The software and hardware necessary to completely automate the measurements are described. Measurements on National Bureau of Standards certified quartz, tungsten, and copper specimens demonstrated an accuracy of plus or minus 1.5% in determination of the coefficient of thermal expansion. (auth)
Date: January 1, 1973
Creator: Kollie, T.G.; McElroy, D.L.; Hutton, J.T. & Ewing, W.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design of a high precision dilatometer using laser interferometry

Description: This study examines the design of a high precision dilatometer which utilizes laser interferometry as the basis for the length measurement system. The dilatometer is being designed for operation from ambient to 800/sup 0/C using samples which require minimal preparation. Several interferometric techniques useful to dilatometry were reviewed from the literature. As a result of this review and establishment of performance criteria, a technical design is proposed. The optical design incorporates a two-frequency He--Ne laser with ac detection in a modified Michelson interferometer. A vertical sample/furnace configuration appears to offer a number of design advantages. Operational considerations and dilatometer development costs are also presented.
Date: December 1, 1978
Creator: Drotning, W.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evolution of Static Physical Properties in Plutonium by Self-irradiation Damage

Description: The alpha-decay of plutonium leads to the age-related change in physical properties. This paper presents updated results of age-related effects on enriched and reference alloys measured from immersion density, dilatometry, and mechanical tests. After nearly 100 equivalent years of aging, both the immersion density and dilatometry show that the enriched alloys are decreasing in density by less than 0.02% per year and now exhibit a near linear density decrease, without void swelling. The tensile tests show that the aging process increases the strength of plutonium alloys, followed by possible saturation past 70 equivalent years of age. The ultimate goal of this work is to develop capabilities to predict physical properties changed by aging effects.
Date: April 13, 2010
Creator: Chung, B W; Lema, K E & Hiromoto, D S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Synthesis and Characterization of Nonbanded U-Nb Plate Material

Description: This report describes the synthesis and characterization of four plates, two each of U-5.5Nb and U-7.5Nb (nominal wt%) for aging studies described elsewhere. The plates were induction melted and cast into graphite molds that were unheated and {approx}0.5 inches thick to maximize the cooling rate and minimize large length-scale Nb segregation (banding). Microstructural images and electron microprobe traces observed after various processing stages, including casting, hot rolling, and homogenizing are documented. The as-cast microsegregation assumed the form of an isotropic cellular structure, with an amplitude of 3-15 wt% Nb and 40-50 micron-length scales. Subsequent thermomechanical processing was shown to be sufficient to attain Nb compositional homogeneity on local scales of hundreds of microns. The results of chemical analysis and other characterization methods are given. The principal impurity elements (of the 40+ elements measured) were carbon, boron, oxygen, tantalum, and iron. In all four plates, after homogenization, the Nb distribution across the entire plate cross-section showed minima at the plate faces and a broad maximum in the center, the differential being 0.5-0.7 wt% in U-7.5Nb and 0.2-0.5 wt% in U-5.5Nb. None of the impurity elements showed statistically significant variations between the center 50% of the plate volume vs the outer 25%. These plates were considered nonbanded and compositionally homogeneous for their proposed use because the required tensile, metallographic, and dilatometer specimens could be extracted from the fairly homogeneous center portion of the plate cross-section. Characterization of the phases and their transition temperatures by x-ray diffraction and dilatometry in rapidly quenched specimens from the final product confirmed that the microstructure of this plate material was suitable for the intended aging studies. The as-quenched tensile response from multiple specimens taken from each plate showed some variability, especially in the ultimate tensile strength and elongation to failure. In general, U-5.5Nb has higher strength and ...
Date: January 22, 2007
Creator: R. E. Hackenberg, R. M Aikin, Jr., J. A. Balog, B. L. Bingham, R. Casey, A. Casteel, I. Cordova, R. Forsyth, F. G. Garcia, D. Guidry, D. L. Hammon, W. L. Hults, D. R. Korzekwa, A. M. Kelly, M. W. Kolby, K. A. Lao, J. C. Lashley, M. F. Lopez, R. McCabe, D. E. Nye, P. A. Papin, S. W. Quintana, J. L. Smith, D. F. Teter, D. J. Thoma, T. Tucker, P. K. Tubesing, R. R. Trujillo, C. J. Vigil, and H. M. Volz
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermophysical Properties of Heat Resistant Shielding Material

Description: This project was aimed at determining thermal conductivity, specific heat and thermal expansion of a heat resistant shielding material for neutron absorption applications. These data are critical in predicting the structural integrity of the shielding under thermal cycling and mechanical load. The measurements of thermal conductivity and specific heat were conducted in air at five different temperatures (-31 F, 73.4 F, 140 F, 212 F and 302 F). The transient plane source (TPS) method was used in the tests. Thermal expansion tests were conducted using push rod dilatometry over the continuous range from -40 F (-40 C) to 302 F (150 C).
Date: December 15, 2004
Creator: Porter, W.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Metals Processing Laboratory Users (MPLUS) Facility Annual Report: October 1, 2000 through September 30, 2001

Description: The Metals Processing Laboratory Users Facility (MPLUS) is a Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial Technologies Program user facility designated to assist researchers in key industries, universities, and federal laboratories in improving energy efficiency, improving environmental aspects, and increasing competitiveness. The goal of MPLUS is to provide access to the specialized technical expertise and equipment needed to solve metals processing issues that limit the development and implementation of emerging metals processing technologies. The scope of work can also extend to other types of materials. MPLUS has four primary User Centers including: (1) Processing--casting, powder metallurgy, deformation processing including (extrusion, forging, rolling), melting, thermomechanical processing, high density infrared processing; (2) Joining--welding, monitoring and control, solidification, brazing, bonding; (3) Characterization--corrosion, mechanical properties, fracture mechanics, microstructure, nondestructive examination, computer-controlled dilatometry, and emissivity; (4) Materials/Process Modeling--mathematical design and analyses, high performance computing, process modeling, solidification/deformation, microstructure evolution, thermodynamic and kinetic, and materials data bases. A fully integrated approach provides researchers with unique opportunities to address technologically related issues to solve metals processing problems and probe new technologies. Access is also available to 16 additional Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) user facilities ranging from state of the art materials characterization capabilities, high performance computing, to manufacturing technologies. MPLUS can be accessed through a standardized User-submitted Proposal and a User Agreement. Nonproprietary (open) or proprietary proposals can be submitted. For open research and development, access to capabilities is provides free of charge while for proprietary efforts, the user pays the entire project costs based on DOE guidelines for ORNL costs.
Date: April 27, 2004
Creator: Angelini, P
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Metals Processing Laboratory Users (MPLUS) Facility Annual Report FY 2002 (October 1, 2001-September 30, 2002)

Description: The Metals Processing Laboratory Users Facility (MPLUS) is a Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial Technologies Program, user facility designated to assist researchers in key industries, universities, and federal laboratories in improving energy efficiency, improving environmental aspects, and increasing competitiveness. The goal of MPLUS is to provide access to the specialized technical expertise and equipment needed to solve metals processing issues that limit the development and implementation of emerging metals processing technologies. The scope of work can also extend to other types of materials. MPLUS has four primary user centers: (1) Processing--casting, powder metallurgy, deformation processing (including extrusion, forging, rolling), melting, thermomechanical processing, and high-density infrared processing; (2) Joining--welding, monitoring and control, solidification, brazing, and bonding; (3) Characterization--corrosion, mechanical properties, fracture mechanics, microstructure, nondestructive examination, computer-controlled dilatometry, and emissivity; and (4) Materials/Process Modeling--mathematical design and analyses, high-performance computing, process modeling, solidification/deformation, microstructure evolution, thermodynamic and kinetic, and materials databases A fully integrated approach provides researchers with unique opportunities to address technologically related issues to solve metals processing problems and probe new technologies. Access is also available to 16 additional Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) user facilities ranging from state-of-the-art materials characterization capabilities, and high-performance computing to manufacturing technologies. MPLUS can be accessed through a standardized user-submitted proposal and a user agreement. Nonproprietary (open) or proprietary proposals can be submitted. For open research and development, access to capabilities is provided free of charge, while for proprietary efforts, the user pays the entire project costs based on DOE guidelines for ORNL costs.
Date: April 27, 2004
Creator: Angelini, P
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mechanisms Associated with Rumpling of Pt-Modified Beta-NiAl Coatings

Description: The formation of surface undulations (i.e. rumpling) at the bond coat/thermally grown oxide (TGO) interface has been shown to cause failure by spallation of the ceramic top coat in aero-turbine systems. Many mechanisms have been proposed concerning the cause of these surface distortions; however, there is little agreement on what may be the dominating cause of the rumpling behavior. Of there mechanisms, the reversible phase transformation from a cubic {beta}-NiAl structure to a face centered tetragonal (FCT) martensitic phase was of particular interest because of its ability to form surface rumpling in Pt-modified {beta} bulk alloys. However, the bulk alloys used in obtaining that result were simple ternary systems and not relevant to actual coating compositions as other alloying elements enter the coating due to coating/substrate interdiffusion at high temperature. In the current study, the depletion behavior of a commercial coating was studied. Compositions from the depletion path were determined and bulk alloys representing these coating compositions were prepared. The martensitic phase transformation was then characterized using DSC and XRD. The martensitic start temperature on cooling, Ms, was consistently found to be significantly lower than previously reported values (e.g. 530 C vs 100 C). Because of the low Ms temperature, the formation of the martensitic phase was concluded to be unnecessary for the occurrence of rumpling. However, cyclic exposure treatments at low temperature ({approx} 400 C) of bulk alloys and commercial coatings did show the detrimental effects of the phase transformation in the form of crack formation and propagation leading to eventual failure of the alloys. The current work also infers that the differences in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between the coating and substrate are the dominating factor leading to rumpling. Dilatometry measurements were made on bulk alloys representing depleted coatings and the superalloy substrate to determine CTE ...
Date: December 1, 2007
Creator: Henderkott, Joseph Peter
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a Standard Methodology for the Quantitative Measurement of Steel Phase Transformation Kinetics and Dilation Strains Using Dilatometric Methods, QMST (TRP 0015)

Description: The purpose of this collaborative project was to develop a standard practice for obtaining and archiving quantitative steel transformation kinetic data and thermal strain data. Two families of dilatometric equipment were employed to develop this standard practice for testing bar product steels. These include high-speed quenching and deformation dilatometers and Gleeble{reg_sign} thermomechanical simulation instruments. Standard measurement, data interpretation and data reporting methods were developed and defined by the cross-industry QMST Consortium members consisting of steel-manufacturers, forgers, heat-treaters, modelers, automotive and heavy vehicle OEMs along with team expert technologists from the National Labs and academia. The team designed phase transformation experiments on two selected steel grades to validate the standard practices--a medium carbon grade SAE 1050 and an alloy steel SAE 8620. A final standard practice document was developed based on the two dilatometry methods, and was submitted to and approved by ASTM (available as A1033-04). The standard practice specifies a method for measuring austenite transformation under no elastic stress or plastic deformation. These methods will be an enabler for the development and electronic archiving of a quantitative database for process modeling using computer simulation software, and will greatly assist endusers in developing accurate process and product simulations during the thermo-mechanical processing of bar and rod product steels.
Date: April 28, 2004
Creator: Metha, Manish & Oakwood, Tom
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The effect of chromium oxide on the properties of simulated nuclear waste glasses

Description: A study of the effect of chromium on the properties of selected glasses was performed in the frame of a Contract between Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories and Nuclear Research Institute, ReZ. In the period from July 1994 to June 1995 two borosilicate glasses of special composition were prepared according to the PNL procedure and their physical and structural characteristics of glasses were studied. This Final Report contains a vast documentation on the properties of all glasses studied. For the preparation of the respective technology more detailed study of physico-chemical properties and crystallinity of investigated systems would be desirable.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Vojtech, O.; Sussmilch, J. & Urbanec, Z.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Austenite Formation Kinetics During Rapid Heating in a Microalloyed Steel

Description: The model parameters for the normalized 1054V1 material were compared to parameters previously generated for 1026 steel, and the transformation behavior was relatively consistent. Validation of the model predictions by heating into the austenite plus undissolved ferrite phase field and rapidly quenching resulted in reasonable predictions when compared to the measured volume fractions from optical metallography. The hot rolled 1054V1 material, which had a much coarser grain size and a non-equilibrium volume fraction of pearlite, had significantly different model parameters and the on heating transformation behavior of this material was less predictable with the established model. The differences in behavior is consistent with conventional wisdom that normalized micro-structure produce a more consistent response to processing, and it reinforces the need for additional work in this area.
Date: September 7, 1999
Creator: Burnett, M. E.; Dykhuzien, Ronald C.; Kelley, J. Bruce; Puskar, Joseph D. & Robino, Charles V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Physical Property Changes in Plutonium from Accelerated Aging using Pu-238 Enrichment

Description: We present changes in volume, immersion density, and tensile properties observed from accelerated aged plutonium alloys. Accelerated alloys (or spiked alloys) are plutonium alloys enriched with approximately 7.5 weight percent of the faster-decaying {sup 238}Pu to accelerate the aging process by approximately 17 times the rate of unaged weapons-grade plutonium. After sixty equivalent years of aging on spiked alloys, the dilatometry shows the samples at 35 C have swelled in volume by 0.15 to 0.17 % and now exhibit a near linear volume increase due to helium in-growth. The immersion density of spiked alloys shows a decrease in density, similar normalized volumetric changes (expansion) for spiked alloys. Tensile tests show increasing yield and engineering ultimate strength as spiked alloys are aged.
Date: December 20, 2006
Creator: Chung, B W; Choi, B W; Saw, C K; Thompson, S R; Woods, C H; Hopkins, D J et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Digital Manufacturing of Gradient Meshed SOFC Sealing Composites with Self-Healing Capabilities

Description: Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) hold great promise for clean power generation. However, high temperature stability and long term durability of the SOFC components have presented serious problems in SOFC technological advancement and commercialization. The seals of the fuel cells are the most challenging area to address. A high temperature gas seal is highly needed which is durable against cracking and gas leakage during thermal cycling and extended operation. This project investigates a novel composite seal by integrating 3D printed shape memory alloy (SMA) wires into a glass matrix. The SMA we use is TiNiHf and the glass matrix we use is SrO-La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} (SLABS). Dilatometry shows to be an extremely useful tool in providing the CTEs. It pinpoints regions of different CTEs under simulated SOFC thermal cycles for the same glass. For the studied SLABS glass system, the region with the greatest CTE mismatch between the glass seal and the adjacent components is 40-500 C, the typical heating and cooling regions for SOFCs. Even for low temperature SOFC development, this region is still present and needs to be addressed. We have demonstrated that the proposed SLABS glass has great potential in mitigating the thermal expansion mismatch issues that are limiting the operation life of SOFCs. TiNiHf alloy has been successfully synthesized with the desired particle size for the 3DP process. The TiNiHf SMA shape memory effect very desirably overlaps with the problematic low CTE region of the glass. This supports the design intent that the gradient structure transition, phase transformation toughening, and self-healing of the SMA can be utilized to mitigate/eliminate the seal problem. For the 3DP process, a new binder has been identified to match with the specific chemistry of the SMA particles. This enables us to directly print SMA particles. Neutron ...
Date: December 21, 2007
Creator: Lu, Kathy; Story, Christopher & Reynolds, W.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DEVELOPMENT OF AN IN-PILE TECHNIQUE FOR THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENT

Description: Thermophysical properties of advanced fuels and materials during irradiation must be known prior to their use in existing, advanced, or next generation reactors. Fuel thermal conductivity is one of the most important properties for predicting fuel performance and reactor safety. This paper discusses a joint Utah State University (USU)/Idaho National Laboratory (INL) project to investigate an in-pile fuel thermal conductivity measurement technique using a surrogate fuel rod. The method used a surrogate fuel rod with Joule heating to simulate volumetric heat generation as a proof-of-concept test in-pile application. Carbon structural foam, CFOAM®, a product of Touchtone Research Laboratory was chosen as the surrogate material because of the variable electrical and thermal properties upon fabrication. To stay within the surrogate fuel rod requirements, electrical and thermal properties were tailored by Touchtone Research Laboratory to match required values. This paper describes are the techniques used for quantifying thermal conductivity. A description of the test setup and preliminary results are presented. Two thermocouples are inserted into a 1-inch diameter, 6-inch long rod of CFOAM® at known locations. Knowing the applied volumetric heat to the rod by electrical resistance heating, the thermal conductivity can be calculated. Sensitivities of this measurement can also found by analysis and testing of different configurations of the sample setup. Verification of thermal conductivity is found by measuring the thermal properties of the CFOAM® using different methods. Thermal properties including thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, and expansion coefficient of two types of CFOAM®, CFOAM20 and CFOAM25, were characterized using standard measurement techniques, such as laser flash, differential scanning calorimetry, and pushrod dilatometry.
Date: April 1, 2009
Creator: Fox, Brandon; Ban, Heng; Rempe, Joy L.; Daw, Joshua E.; Condie, Keith G. & Knudson, Darrell L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) nickel alloys for potential use as interconnects in SOFC

Description: This paper deals with the development of low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) nickel-base superalloys for potential use as interconnects for SOFC. Ni-Mo-Cr alloys were formulated with CTE on the order of 12.5 to 13.5 x10-6/°C. The alloys were vacuum induction melted and reduced to sheet via a combination of hot and cold working. Dilatometry was used to measure CTE of the alloys. Oxidation behavior of the alloys at 800°C in dry and moist air is reported. The results are compared to results for Haynes 230 (a commercial Ni-base superalloy) and for Crofer 22APU (a commercial ferritic stainless steel designed specifically for use as an SOFC interconnect).
Date: November 1, 2004
Creator: Alman, David E. & Jablonski, Paul D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Density Changes in Plutonium Observed from Accelerated Aging Using Pu-238 Enrichment

Description: In support of Stockpile Stewardship activities, accelerated aging tests on a plutonium alloy enriched with 7.3 atomic percentage of {sup 238}Pu is underway using dilatometry at 35, 50, and 65 C and immersion density measurements of material stored at 50 C. Changes in density are expected from radiation damage in the lattice and helium in-growth. After twenty-five equivalent years of aging, the dilatometry data shows that the alloys at 35 C have expanded in volume by 0.11% to 0.12% and have started to exhibit a near linear expansion behavior primarily caused by the helium accumulation. The average He-to-vacancy ratio from tested specimens was determined to be around 2.3. The model for the lattice damage and helium in-growth accurately represents the volume swelling at 35 C. The density converted from the dilatometry corresponds well to the decreasing density trend of reference plutonium alloys as a function of time.
Date: October 19, 2005
Creator: Chung, B W; Thompson, S R; Woods, C H; Hopkins, D J; Gourdin, W H & Ebbinghaus, B B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) geotechnical report, WSRC-TR-95-0057, Revision 0, Volume 6

Description: The SRS/ITP Soil Evaluation Testing Program was developed and performed to investigate the behavior of the soil deposits at the Savannah River Site`s In-Tank Precipitation facility under dynamic loading. There were two distinct soil deposits involved in the current testing program: the Tobacco Road formation (sampled at depths between 28 and 100 feet at the site) and the Santee formation (sampled from depths between 170 and 180 feet). The Tobacco Road samples consisted of clayey sands (typically {open_quotes}SC{close_quotes} by the Unified Soil Classification System), yellow to reddish-brown in color with fine to medium sized sand particles. The Santee samples were also clayey sands, but nearly white in color. The two types of cyclic triaxial tests performed at the U.C. Berkeley Geotechnical Laboratories as part of this testing program were (a) traditional liquefaction tests and (b) low-amplitude cyclic tests designed to provide information on threshold strains for these specimens. This report describes the results of both the liquefaction testing component of the study, which was limited to the soils from the Tobacco Road formation, and the low-amplitude testing of both Tobacco Road and Santee specimens. Additional information was obtained from some of the specimens by (a) measuring the volumetric strains of many of the specimens when drainage (and reconsolidation) was permitted following liquefaction, or (b) determining the residual stress-strain behavior of other specimens subjected to monotonic loading immediately following liquefaction. This document is Volume 6 of the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) Geotechnical Report, and contains laboratory test results.
Date: November 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) geotechnical report, WSRC-TR-95-0057, Revision 0, Volume 3

Description: A geotechnical study has been completed in H-Area for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and the balance of the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The study consisted of subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing, and engineering analyses. The purpose of these investigations is to evaluate the overall stability of the H-Area tanks under static and dynamic conditions. The objectives of the study are to define the site-specific geological conditions at ITP and HTF, obtain engineering properties for the assessment of the stability of the native soils and embankment under static and dynamic loads (i.e., slope stability, liquefaction potential, and potential settlements), and derive properties for soil-structure interaction studies. This document contains the records of cone penetrometer and dilatometer soundings for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) Geotechnical Report, Volume 3.
Date: June 2, 1995
Creator: Fisk, B.E. & Timian, D.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In-tank precipitation facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) geotechnical report, WSRC-TR-95-0057, Revision 0, Volume 5

Description: A geotechnical study has been completed in H-Area for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and the balance of the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The study consisted of subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing, and engineering analyses. The purpose of these investigations is to evaluate the overall stability of the H-Area tanks under static and dynamic conditions. The objectives of the study are to define the site-specific geological conditions at ITP and HTF, obtain engineering properties for the assessment of the stability of the native soils and embankment under static and dynamic loads (i.e., slope stability, liquefaction potential, and potential settlements), and derive properties for soil-structure interaction studies. This document (Volume 5) contains the laboratory test results for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) Geotechnical Report.
Date: November 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) geotechnical report, WSRC-TR-95-0057, Revision 0, Volume 4

Description: A geotechnical study has been completed in H-Area for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and the balance of the H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The study consisted of subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing, and engineering analyses. The purpose of these investigations is to evaluate the overall stability of the H-Area tanks under static and dynamic conditions. The objectives of the study are to define the site-specific geological conditions at ITP and HTF, obtain engineering properties for the assessment of the stability of the native soils and embankment under static and dynamic loads (i.e., slope stability, liquefaction potential, and potential settlements), and derive properties for soil-structure interaction studies. This document (Volume 4) contains the laboratory test results for the In-Tank Precipitation Facility (ITP) and H-Tank Farm (HTF) Geotechnical Report.
Date: November 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department