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ORNL/IAT ARMATURE DIAGNOSTICS DEMONSTRATION TEST REPORT: PART TWO: BENCH DEMONSTRATION

Description: The purpose of the present effort was to demonstrate 'on the fly' temperature measurement of railgun armatures on a bench top railgun. The effort builds on the previous test that utilized a portable unit with armature speeds ranging from 50 to 90 m/s. The tests described here involved higher speeds, ranging from 300 to 500 m/s. The method to accomplish the measurement involves pulsed laser illumination of a phosphor-coated armature. The duration of the ensuing fluorescence indicates temperature. The measured temperatures, obtained both inside the muzzle and outside in free flight, ranged between 80 to 110 C. The required pulsed fluorescence was made possible by successfully sensing the position of the armature while traveling within the laser illumination and fluorescence sensing fields-of-view. A high-speed camera also captured images of the moving armatures after exiting the railgun. These images sometimes included the fluorescing region of the phosphor coating.
Date: December 1, 2005
Creator: Allison, Stephen W; Cates, Michael R; Goedeke, Shawn; Crawford, M. T.; Ferraro, S. B.; Surls, D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interwell Connectivity and Diagnosis Using Correlation of Production and Injection Rate Data in Hydrocarbon Production

Description: This report details progress and results on inferring interwell communication from well rate fluctuations. Starting with the procedure of Albertoni and Lake (2003) as a foundation, the goal of the project was to develop further procedures to infer reservoir properties through weights derived from correlations between injection and production rates. A modified method, described in Yousef and others (2006a,b), and herein referred to as the 'capacitance model', is the primary product of this research project. The capacitance model (CM) produces two quantities, {lambda} and {tau}, for each injector-producer well pair. For the CM, we have focused on the following items: (1) Methods to estimate {lambda} and {tau} from simulated and field well rates. The original method uses both non-linear and linear regression and lacks the ability to include constraints on {lambda} and {tau}. The revised method uses only non-linear regression, permitting constraints to be included as well as accelerating the solution so that problems with large numbers of wells are more tractable. (2) Approaches to integrate {lambda} and {tau} to improve connectivity evaluations. Interpretations have been developed using Lorenz-style and log-log plots to assess heterogeneity. Testing shows the interpretations can identify whether interwell connectivity is controlled by flow through fractures, high-permeability layers, or due to partial completion of wells. Applications to the South Wasson and North Buck Draw Fields show promising results. (3) Optimization of waterflood injection rates using the CM and a power law relationship for watercut to maximize economic return. Tests using simulated data and a range of oil prices show the approach is working. (4) Investigation of methods to increase the robustness of {lambda} and {tau} estimates. Human interventions, such as workovers, also cause rate fluctuations and can be misinterpreted by the model if bottom hole pressure data are not available. A revised method, called the 'segmented ...
Date: March 31, 2007
Creator: Jensen, Jerry L.; Lake, Larry W.; Al-Yousef, Ali; Weber, Dan; Liang, Ximing; Edgar, T.F. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Z-Pinch Driven Isentropic Compression for Inertial Fusion

Description: The achievement of high gain with inertial fusion requires the compression of hydrogen isotopes to high density and temperatures. High densities can be achieved most efficiently by isentropic compression. This requires relatively slow pressure pulses on the order of 10-20 nanoseconds; however, the pressure profile must have the appropriate time. We present 1-D numerical simulations that indicate such a pressure profile can be generated by using pulsed power driven z pinches. Although high compression is calculated, the initial temperature is too low for ignition. Ignition could be achieved by heating a small portion of this compressed fuel with a short (-10 ps) high power laser pulse as previously described. Our 1-D calculations indicate that the existing Z-accelerator could provide the driving current (-20 MA) necessary to compress fuel to roughly 1500 times solid density. At this density the required laser energy is approximately 10 kJ. Multidimensional effects such as the Rayleigh-Taylor were not addressed in this brief numerical study. These effects will undoubtedly lower fuel compression for a given chive current. Therefore it is necessary to perform z-pinch driven compression experiments. Finally, we present preliminary experimental data from the Z-accelerator indicating that current can be efficiently delivered to appropriately small loads (- 5 mm radius) and that VISAR can be used measure high pressure during isentropic compression.
Date: February 1, 1999
Creator: Asay, J.R.; Hall, C.A.; Holland, K.G.; Slutz, S.A.; Spielman, R.B. & Stygar, W.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electron Bunch Length Diagnostic With Coherent Smith-Purcell Radiation

Description: The authors have designed a new technique for measuring subpicosecond electron bunch lengths using coherent Smith-Purcell radiation. This new diagnostic technique involves passing the electron beam in close proximity of a grating with a period comparable to the electron bunch length. The emitted Smith-Purcell radiation will have a coherent component whose angular position and distribution are directly related to the electron bunch length and longitudinal profile, respectively. This new diagnostic technique is inherently simple, inexpensive and non-intercepting. The authors show that the new technique is also scaleable to femtosecond regime.
Date: May 12, 1997
Creator: Nguyen, D.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The mean evolution and variability of the Asian summer monsoon: comparison of ECMWF and NCEP/NCAR reanalyses

Description: The behavior of the Asian Summer Monsoon is compared using the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Reanalysis (ERA) and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis (Kalnay et al. 1996). The goals of this paper are to identify common features between the reanalyses, to assess their robustness for model validation, and especially to use reanalyses to develop their understanding of the mean evolution of the Asian Summer Monsoon and the characteristics of its interannual and intraseasonal variability (Annamalai et al. 1999).
Date: April 21, 1999
Creator: Annamalai, H.; Hodges, K.; Slingo, J.M. & Sperber, K.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2003 Laser Diagnostic in Combustion Conference

Description: The GRC Laser Diagnostics in Combustion aims at bringing together scientists and engineers working in the front edge of research and development to discuss and find new ways to solve problems connected to combustion diagnostics. Laser-based techniques have proven to be very efficient tools for studying combustion processes thanks to features as non-intrusiveness in combination with high spatial and temporal resolution. Major tasks for the community are to develop and apply techniques for quantitative measurements with high precision e.g of species concentrations, temperatures, velocities and particles characteristics (size and concentration). These issues are of global interest, considering that the major part of the World's energy conversion comes from combustion sources and the influence combustion processes have on the environment and society.
Date: September 10, 2004
Creator: Allen, Mark G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ORNL/IAT ARMATURE DIAGNOSTICS DEMONSTRATION TEST REPORT

Description: This test established feasibility for 'on the fly' temperature measurements of rail gun projectiles. In addition, an approach for projectile velocity measurement was also demonstrated. Insight was gained into other useful optical and fiberoptic diagnostic approaches. Instantaneous diagnostics could be critical for achieving further improvements in rail gun operation. They have the potential to enable design enhancements by providing information on the state of the armature and its relationship to the rail as it proceeds down the bore. To that end, the following was accomplished: (1) Optical fibers successfully delivered optical excitation and returned reflective and fluorescence signals as desired. (2) Luminescent coatings survived multiple firings--approximately 40 shots. (3) Optical triggering effectively synchronized an ultraviolet laser pulse to strike the moving armature. (4) Velocity measurements were successfully accomplished by either triggering on the armature front edge using two red diode lasers or by using a single laser and grooved marks a known distance apart on the armature surface. (5) Velocities ranged from 19 to 88 m/s. (6) Temperatures of 30 to 92 C were measured with a precision of about 2 C-: (a) This precision was achieved with a single laser shot and (b) Motion effect was observed but a methodology adequately corrected the result. The correction was only about 2 C. (7) Adequate signal-to-noise and measurement precision was achieved with a single laser shot.
Date: March 1, 2005
Creator: Allison, Stephen W; Cates, Michael R; Goedeke, Shawn; Crawford, M. T.; Ferraro, S. B. & Akerman, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Diagnostics development plan for ZR.

Description: The Z Refurbishment (ZR) Project is a program to upgrade the Z machine at SNL with modern durable pulsed power technology, providing additional shot capacity and improved reliability as well as advanced capabilities for both pulsed x-ray production and high pressure generation. The development of enhanced diagnostic capabilities is an essential requirement for ZR to meet critical mission needs. This report presents a comprehensive plan for diagnostic instrument and infrastructure development for the first few years of ZR operation. The focus of the plan is on: (1) developing diagnostic instruments with high spatial and temporal resolution, capable of low noise operation and survival in the severe EMP, bremsstrahlung, and blast environments of ZR; and (2) providing diagnostic infrastructure improvements, including reduced diagnostic trigger signal jitter, more and flexible diagnostic line-of-sight access, and the capability for efficient exchange of diagnostics with other laboratories. This diagnostic plan is the first step in an extended process to provide enhanced diagnostic capabilities for ZR to meet the diverse programmatic needs of a broad range of defense, energy, and general science programs of an international user community into the next decade.
Date: September 1, 2003
Creator: Hanson, David Lester
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final Report - DOE Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics

Description: This Final Report summarizes the significant progress made by the researchers, students and staff of the Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics (CLICD) from January 1998 through May 2002. During this period, the Center supported several projects. Most projects were proposed initially, some were added subsequently as their relevance and importance to the DOE mission became evident. DOE support has been leveraged to obtain continuing funding for some projects. Leveraged funds come from various sources, including NIH, Army, NSF and the Air Force. The goal of the Center was to develop laser-based instruments for use in the detection and diagnosis of major diseases, with an emphasis on detection and diagnosis of various cancers. Each of the supported projects is a collaborative effort between physicists and laser scientists and the City College of New York and noted physicians, surgeons, pathologists, and biologists located at medical centers in the Metropolitan area. The participating institutions were: City College of New York Institute for Ultrafast Lasers and Spectroscopy, Hackensack University Medical Center, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and New York Eye and Ear Institute. Each of the projects funded by the Center is grouped into one of four research categories: a) Disease Detection, b) Non-Disease Applications, c) New Diagnostic Tools, and, d) Education, Training, Outreach and Dissemination. The progress achieved by the multidisciplinary teams was reported in 51 publications and 32 presentations at major national conferences. Also, one U.S. patent was obtained and six U.S. patent applications have been filed for innovations resulting from the projects sponsored by the Center.
Date: October 31, 2002
Creator: Alfano, Robert R. & Koutcher, Jason A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interwell Connectivity and Diagnosis Using Correlation of Production and Injection Rate Data in Hydrocarbon Production

Description: This report details progress on inferring interwell communication from well rate fluctuations. Starting with the procedure of Albertoni and Lake (2003) as a foundation, the goal of the project is to develop further procedures to infer reservoir properties through weights derived from correlations between injection and production rates. A modified method, described in Jensen et al. (2005) and Yousef et al. (2005), and herein referred to as the ''capacitance model'', produces two quantities, {lambda} and {tau}, for each injector-producer well pair. We have focused on the following items: (1) Approaches to integrate {lambda} and {tau} to improve connectivity evaluations. Interpretations have been developed using Lorenz-style and log-log plots to assess heterogeneity. Testing shows the interpretations can identify whether interwell connectivity is controlled by flow through fractures, high-permeability layers, or due to partial completion of wells. Applications to the South Wasson and North Buck Draw Fields show promising results. (2) Optimization of waterflood injection rates using the capacitance model and a power law relationship for watercut to maximize economic return. Initial tests using simulated data and a range of oil prices show the approach is working. (3) Spectral analysis of injection and production data to estimate interwell connectivity and to assess the effects of near-wellbore gas on the results. Development of methods and analysis are ongoing. (4) Investigation of methods to increase the robustness of the capacitance method. These methods include revising the solution method to simultaneously estimate {lambda} and {tau} for each well pair. This approach allows for further constraints to be imposed during the computation, such as limiting {tau} to a range of values defined by the sampling interval and duration of the field data. This work is proceeding. Further work on this project includes the following: (1) Refinement and testing of the waterflood optimization process, including optimization on ...
Date: May 31, 2005
Creator: Jensen, Jerry L.; Lake, Larry W.; Al-Yousef, Ali; Gentil, Pablo & Demiroren, Nazli
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aircraft wire system laboratory development : phase I progress report.

Description: An aircraft wire systems laboratory has been developed to support technical maturation of diagnostic technologies being used in the aviation community for detection of faulty attributes of wiring systems. The design and development rationale of the laboratory is based in part on documented findings published by the aviation community. The main resource at the laboratory is a test bed enclosure that is populated with aged and newly assembled wire harnesses that have known defects. This report provides the test bed design and harness selection rationale, harness assembly and defect fabrication procedures, and descriptions of the laboratory for usage by the aviation community.
Date: August 1, 2003
Creator: Dinallo, Michael Anthony & Lopez, Christopher D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MRF Applications: Measurement of Process-dependent Subsurface Damage in Optical Materials using the MRF Wedge Technique

Description: Understanding the behavior of fractures and subsurface damage in the processes used during optic fabrication plays a key role in determining the final quality of the optical surface finish. During the early stages of surface preparation, brittle grinding processes induce fractures at or near an optical surface whose range can extend from depths of a few mm to hundreds of mm depending upon the process and tooling being employed. Controlling the occurrence, structure, and propagation of these sites during subsequent grinding and polishing operations is highly desirable if one wishes to obtain high-quality surfaces that are free of such artifacts. Over the past year, our team has made significant strides in developing a diagnostic technique that combines magnetorheological finishing (MRF) and scanning optical microscopy to measure and characterize subsurface damage in optical materials. The technique takes advantage of the unique nature of MRF to polish a prescribed large-area wedge into the optical surface without propagating existing damage or introducing new damage. The polished wedge is then analyzed to quantify subsurface damage as a function of depth from the original surface. Large-area measurement using scanning optical microscopy provides for improved accuracy and reliability over methods such as the COM ball-dimple technique. Examples of the technique's use will be presented that illustrate the behavior of subsurface damage in fused silica that arises during a variety of intermediate optical fabrication process steps.
Date: November 2, 2005
Creator: Menapace, J A; Davis, P J; Steele, W A; Wong, L L; Suratwala, T I & Miller, P E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pinhole aperture point backlighter development experiments on Trident, 9-13, 2001

Description: Pinhole aperture point backlighter (PAPBL) imaging has been used on experiments on Omega, but results have been compromised by large backgrounds. This technique has advantages over traditional area backlighting/pinhole imaging, and the Omega experiments could benefit from this capability, but Omega time is expensive and not the place for developing diagnostic techniques if they can be developed on Trident instead. PAPBL, shot from Direct Drive Cylinder Mix experiments on Omega (DDCYLMIX 00-1, January 18 and 19, 2000). [See LA-UR-00-4187, Post-Shot Report, Direct Drive Cylinder Mix]. In this campaign, they used Trident to obtain clean PAPBL images. Having accomplished that, they attempted to replicate the noise environment of Omega by producing hot electrons and having them impinge on material to produce high-energy x-rays similar to those that might be produced by hot electrons impinging on diagnostics or target positioner components on Omega. Backlighter target design was based, to some degree, on that shown by Bullock et al. at the 42nd Annual APS-DPP Meeting in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, October 23-27, 2000. [A.B. Bullock et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 45,(7) 359 (2000); A.B. Bullock et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 72, 690 (2001).] We accomplished this to some degree and then attempted, with some success, to obtain a good PAPBL image in the presence of this noise. Results of this work suggest methods that might reduce the background noise in Omega PAPBL images. The goals are to obtain a pinhole aperture point backlighter (PAPBL) image on Trident and develop a method to simulate the high-energy background contribution to PAPBL imnages seen on Omega experients in order to allow future experiments to optimize signal-to-noise in PAPBL imaging.
Date: January 1, 2001
Creator: Lanier, N. E. (Nicholas E.) & Murphy, Thomas J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Vertical cavity surface-emitting laser scanning cytometer for high speed analysis of cells

Description: We have constructed a new semiconductor laser device that may be useful in high speed characterization of cell morphology for diagnosis of disease. This laser device has critical advantages over conventional cell fluorescence detection methods since it provides intense, monochromatic, low-divergence fight signals that are emitted from lasing modes confined by a cell. Further, the device integrates biological structures with semiconductor materials at the wafer level to reduce device size and simplify cell preparation. In this paper we discuss operational characteristics of the prototype cytometer and present preliminary data for blood cells and dielectric spheres.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Gourley, P.L.; McDonald, A.E. & Gourley, M.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department