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A Study of Depth Perception Among Brain-injured, Familial and Idiopathic Mentally Retarded Subjects

Description: In light of the conflicting data regarding depth perception and the retardate, it was the purpose of this study to reinvestigate whether or not significant differences exist in depth perceptual abilities among mental retardates. A standard depth perception apparatus was utilized to test the groups of brain-injured, familial and idiopathic subjects.
Date: January 1963
Creator: Wright, Ronald W.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Using Paired Depth Interviews to Collect Qualitative Data

Description: This article defines and describes paired depth interviews, discusses conceptualizations of paired depth interviews using Roulston's framework, delineates the strengths and limitations of paired depth interviews, and provides examples of paired depth interviews utilized in helping professions.
Date: September 5, 2016
Creator: Wilson, Angela K.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J. & Manning, LaShondra P.
Partner: UNT College of Arts and Sciences

A retrospective on the LBNL PEM project

Description: We present a retrospective on the LBNL Positron EmissionMammography (PEM) project, looking back on our design and experiences.The LBNL PEM camera utilizes detector modules that are capable ofmeasuring depth of interaction (DOI) and places them into 4 detectorbanks in a rectangular geometry. In order to build this camera, we had todevelop the DOI detector module, LSO etching, Lumirror-epoxy reflectorfor the LSO array (to achieve optimal DOI), photodiode array, custom IC,rigid-flex readout board, packaging, DOI calibration and reconstructionalgorithms for the rectangular camera geometry. We will discuss thehighlights (good and bad) of these developments.
Date: November 15, 2004
Creator: Huber, J. S.; Moses, W. W.; Wang, G. C.; Derenzo, S. E.; Huesman, R. H.; Qi, J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009

Description: The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. This includes three recently acquired Transportable Array stations located at Cold Creek, Didier Farms, and Phinney Hill. For the Hanford Seismic Network, ten local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2009. All earthquakes were considered as “minor” with magnitudes (Mc) less than 1.0. Two earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), most likely in the Columbia River basalts; five earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the sub-basalt sediments); and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, four earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events.
Date: March 15, 2009
Creator: Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E. & Devary, Joseph L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Second Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008

Description: The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The Hanford Seismic Assessment Team locates and identifies sources of seismic activity and monitors changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the seismic monitoring organization works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. For the Hanford Seismic Network, seven local earthquakes were recorded during the second quarter of fiscal year 2008. The largest event recorded by the network during the second quarter (February 3, 2008 - magnitude 2.3 Mc) was located northeast of Richland in Franklin County at a depth of 22.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, two earthquakes occurred at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), three earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and two earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, five earthquakes occurred in swarm areas and two earthquakes were classified as random events.
Date: June 26, 2008
Creator: Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E. & Devary, Joseph L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Influence of Hypnotic Susceptibility and Two Induction Techniques on Hypnotic Depth

Description: This study investigated depth of hypnosis self-reported by subjects on the Field Inventory of Hypnotic Depth (FIHD) after experiencing one of two formal hypnotic inductions. The 68 subjects (41 females and 27 males) ranged in age from 17 to 47 (mean 25.3) and were placed into a high susceptibility group or a low susceptibility group based on their scores on the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility (HGSHS:A). Both the low susceptibility group and the high susceptibility group were further divided randomly so that half of each group received an indirect induction treatment and the other half received a direct induction treatment.
Date: August 1983
Creator: Hamilton, Peter Scott.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Simple model of the anisotropic penetration depth in high T{sub c} superconductors

Description: We present a simple model of some high {Tc} cuprates based upon superconducting (S) and normal (N) layers, which quantitatively fits the data of Bonn et al. for the low-temperature T dependence of the penetration depths {lambda}{sub a,b,c} in untwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}, assuming s-wave intralyer pairing. This SN model also leads to anisotropic surface states, which complicate analysis of photoemission and tunneling measurements.
Date: April 1, 1996
Creator: Klemm, R.A. & Liu, S.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

K East canister sludge survey

Description: Sludge depths were measured in 60 selected canisters in the K East Basin. The projected K East basin total canister sludge inventory based on these measurements is 3 cubic meters. After sludge samples were extracted from 12 canisters, the sludge depth measurements were repeated to confirm adequate sample volumes had been obtained to perform prescribed analytical and testing activities.
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Pitner, A.L., Westinghouse Hanford
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Seismic-source corner frequencies from the depth of burial experiment

Description: The results from the depth of burial experiment (DOB) are consistent with cube-root scaling and with previous observations that the source corner frequency for underground explosions increases with depth. The corner frequencies, however, were overpredicted by Mueller and Murphy (1971) and underpredicted by Denny and Johnson (1991).
Date: November 23, 1998
Creator: Denny, M.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of Fragmentation and Resulting Shrapnel Penetration of Naturally Fragmenting Cylindrical Bombs

Description: Fragmentation of exploding cylinders and penetration mechanics of surrounding vessel walls were examined and a qualitative understanding was achieved. This understanding provided a basis for making simplifying approximations and assumptions that aided in creating a shrapnel penetration model. Several mathematical models were discussed, and results from 6 cylinder tests were analyzed in order to select a model that best represented the data. It was determined that the overall best mathematical model to predict shrapnel penetration uses the modified Gurney equation to calculate fragment velocity, the Mott equation to calculate largest fragment weight, and the Christman/Gehring equation to calculate penetration depth.
Date: August 1, 2000
Creator: Gardner, S.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of Depth-Sensing Indentation Tests with a Knoop Indenter

Description: The present work shows how data obtained in a depth-sensing indentation test using a Knoop indenter may be analyzed to provide elastic modulus and hardness of the specimen material. The method takes into account the elastic recovery along the direction of the short axis of the residual impression as the indenter is removed. If elastic recovery is not accounted for, the elastic modulus and hardness are overestimated by an amount that depends on the ratio of E/H of the specimen material. The new method of analysis expresses the elastic recovery of the short diagonal of the residual impression into an equivalent face angle for one side of the Knoop indenter. Conventional methods of analysis using this corrected angle provide results for modulus and hardness that are consistent with those obtained with other types of indenters.
Date: May 1, 2001
Creator: Riester, L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Study of a double bubbler for material balance in liquids

Description: The objective of this project was to determine the potential of a double bubbler to measure density and fluid level of the molten salt contained in an electrorefiner. Such in-situ real-time measurements can provide key information for material balances in the pyroprocessing of the nuclear spent fuel. This theoretical study showed this technique has a lot of promise. Four different experiments were designed and performed. The first three experiments studied the influence of a variety of factors such as depth difference between the two tubes, gas flow rate, the radius of the tubes and determining the best operating conditions. The last experiment purpose was to determine the precision and accuracy of the apparatus during specific conditions. The elected operating conditions for the characterization of the system were a difference of depth of 25 cm and a flow rate of 55 ml/min in each tube. The measured densities were between 1,000 g/l and 1,400g/l and the level between 34cm and 40 cm. The depth difference between the tubes is critical, the larger, the better. The experiments showed that the flow rate should be the same in each tube. The concordances with theoretical predictions were very good. The density precision was very satisfying (spread<0.1%) and the accuracy was about 1%. For the level determination, the precision was also very satisfying (spread<0.1%), but the accuracy was about 3%. However, those two biases could be corrected with calibration curves. In addition to the aqueous systems studied in the present work, future work will focus on examining the behavior of the double bubbler instrumentation in molten salt systems. The two main challenges which were identified in this work are the effect of the temperature and the variation of the superficial tension.
Date: September 1, 2013
Creator: Lambert, Hugues
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2012 SRNL-EM VANE RHEOLOGY RESULTS

Description: The vane method has been shown to be an effective tool in measuring the yield stress of both settled and mixed slurries in laboratory bench scale conditions in supporting assessments of both actual and simulant waste slurries. The vane has also been used to characterize dry powders and granular solids, the effect of non-cohesive solids with interstitial fluids and used as a guide to determine if slip is present in the geometries typically used to perform rheological flow curve measurements. The vane has been extensively characterized for measuring the shear strength in soils in both field and laboratory studies. The objectives for this task are: Fabricate vane instrument; Bench top testing to further characterize the effect of cohesive, non-cohesive, and blends of cohesive/non-cohesive simple simulants; Data from measurement of homogenized and settled bed of Kaolin sludge and assessment of the technology. In this document, the assessment using bench scale measurements of non-cohesive materials (beads) and cohesive materials (kaolin) is discussed. The non-cohesive materials include various size beads and the vane was assessed for depth and deaeration (or packing) via tapping measurements. For the cohesive (or non-Newtonian) materials, flow curves and yield stress measurements are performed using the vane and this data is compared to the traditional concentric cylinder flow curve measurement. Finally, a large scale vane was designed, fabricated, and tested with the cohesive (or non-Newtonian) materials to determine how a larger vane performs in measuring the yield stress and flow curve of settled cohesive solids.
Date: August 31, 2012
Creator: Hansen, E.; Marzolf, A. & Hera, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Control Systems Cyber Security:Defense in Depth Strategies

Description: Information infrastructures across many public and private domains share several common attributes regarding IT deployments and data communications. This is particularly true in the control systems domain. A majority of the systems use robust architectures to enhance business and reduce costs by increasing the integration of external, business, and control system networks. However, multi-network integration strategies often lead to vulnerabilities that greatly reduce the security of an organization, and can expose mission-critical control systems to cyber threats. This document provides guidance and direction for developing ‘defense-in-depth’ strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture that requires: Maintenance of various field devices, telemetry collection, and/or industrial-level process systems Access to facilities via remote data link or modem Public facing services for customer or corporate operations A robust business environment that requires connections among the control system domain, the external Internet, and other peer organizations.
Date: May 1, 2006
Creator: Kuipers, David & Fabro, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wavelength Shifting Phoswich Detectors for Superior Depth-of-Interaction Resolution

Description: In order to simultaneously achieve both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity in small Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems, scintillation detectors must be long in the radial direction as well as able to provide depth-of-interaction (DOI) information. DOI information is typically provided by constructing detectors from two or more layers of scintillators that are identifiable due to their different decay times. This approach has worked well in tomographs such as the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT, CTI PET Systems, Inc.) in which the emission and excitation bands of the scintillator layers do not overlap each other. However, many potentially important pairs of scintillator crystals exist in which the emission of one crystal is, in fact, absorbed and re-emitted by the second crystal, thus impacting the pulse shape discrimination process used to identify the scintillator layers. These potentially useful pairs of scintillators are unlikely to be implemented in phoswich detectors without a comprehensive understanding of the complex emission that results when the light of one crystal is absorbed by the second crystal and then reemitted. Our objective is to develop a fundamental understanding of the optical phenomena that occur in phoswich detectors and to exploit these phenomena to achieve improved spatial resolution in small high sensitivity PET scanners.
Date: October 25, 2012
Creator: Melcher, Charles L & Eriksson, Lars
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Agreement Between Local and Global Measurements of the London Penetration Depth

Description: Recent measurements of the superconducting penetration depth in Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} appeared to disagree on the magnitude and curvature of {delta}{lambda}{sub ab}(T), even near optimal doping. These measurements were carried out on different samples grown by different groups. To understand the discrepancy, we use scanning SQUID susceptometry and a tunnel diode resonator to measure the penetration depth in a single sample. The penetration depth observed by the two techniques is identical with no adjustments. We conclude that any discrepancies arise from differences between samples, either in growth or crystal preparation.
Date: August 29, 2012
Creator: Lippman, Thomas M.; Kalisky, Beena; Kim, Hyunsoo; Tanatar, Makariy; Budko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department