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Feeding Cottonseed Products to Livestock

Description: Report discussing practices and giving guidelines for feeding cottonseed products to livestock. The composition and grades of cottonseed products are discussed, as well as their possibly poisonous effects on young calves and pigs, in addition to the suitability of cottonseed products for different classes of livestock.
Date: 1920
Creator: Sheets, E. W. & Thompson, E. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cottonseed Microsomal N-Acylphosphatidylethanolamine Synthase: Identification, Purification and Biochemical Characterization of a Unique Acyltransferase

Description: N-Acylphosphatidylethanoiamine (NAPE) is synthesized in the microsomes of cotton seedlings by a mechanism that is possibly unique to plants, the ATP-, Ca2+-, and CoA-independent acylation ofphosphatidylethanolamine (PE) with unesterified free fatty acids (FFAs), catalyzed by NAPE synthase. A photoreactive free fatty acid analogue, 12-[(4- azidosalicyl)amino]dodecanoic acid (ASD), and its 125I-labeled derivative acted as substrates for the NAPE synthase enzyme.
Date: December 1998
Creator: McAndrew, Rosemary S. (Rosemary Smith)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Genetic Modification of Fatty Acid Profiles in Cotton

Description: The industrial uses of cottonseed oil are limited by its fatty acid composition. Genetic modification of cotton lipid profiles using seed-specific promoters could allow cotton growers to produce valuable new oils in the seed without adverse effects on fiber quality and yield, therefore making this crop more commercially profitable. Transgenic cotton callus harboring a diverged fatty acid desaturase gene (FADX) from Momordica charantia was characterized for production of alpha-eleostearic acid (conjugated double bonds: 18:3 D9 cis, 11 trans, 13 trans), not normally found in cotton. Gas chromatography (GC) in conjunction with mass spectrometry (MS) confirmed production of alpha-eleostearic acid in the transgenic cotton tissues. A second series of transformation experiments introduced the cotton fatty acid thioesterase B (FATB) cDNA, fused to the seed-specific oleosin promoter into cotton to promote the over-expression of FATB, to generate cotton with increased palmitate in the cottonseed. PCR amplification, as well as fatty acid analysis by gas chromatography, confirmed introduction of the FATB cDNA in transgenic tissues. Collectively, these results demonstrate the feasibility of manipulating the fatty acid composition in cotton via transgenic approaches and form the basis for continued efforts to create novel oils in cottonseed.
Access: This item is restricted to the UNT Community Members at a UNT Libraries Location.
Date: August 2005
Creator: Rommel, Amy A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Utilization of Farm Wastes in Feeding Live Stock

Description: "More than one-third of the total production of grain straw in the United States is not being used to advantage, and of this amount one-half is an absolute loss.... This bulletin points out methods whereby these wastes may be eliminated, our herds and flocks economically maintained, and the amount of grain used for the feeding of livestock reduced to the minimum." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Ray, S. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Advantage of Planting Heavy Cotton Seed

Description: Report discussing the importance of using heavy cotton seed and separating it for planting. Experiments have established that heavier seeds more reliably produce better plants. Methods of separating and testing the seeds are discussed, including the equipment necessary for seed separation.
Date: 1907
Creator: Webber, Herbert John, 1865-1946 & Boykin, E. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Palmitoyl-acyl Carrier Protein Thioesterase in Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.): Biochemical and Molecular Characterization of a Major Mechanism for the Regulation of Palmitic Acid Content

Description: The relatively high level of palmitic acid (22 mol%) in cottonseeds may be due in part to the activity of a palmitoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase (PATE). In embryo extracts, PATE activity was highest at the maximum rate of reserve accumulation (oil and protein). The cotton FatB mRNA transcript abundance also peaked during this developmental stage, paralleling the profiles of PATE enzyme activity and seed oil accumulation. A cotton FatB cDNA clone was isolated by screening a cDNA library with a heterologous Arabidopsis FatB probe (Pirtle et al., 1999, Plant and Cell Physiology 40: 155-163). The predicted amino acid sequence of the cotton PATE preprotein had 63% identity to the Arabidopsis FatB thioesterase sequence, suggesting that the cotton cDNA clone probably encoded a FatB-type thioesterase. When acyl-CoA synthetase-minus E. coli mutants expressed the cotton cDNA, an increase in 16:0 free fatty acid content was measured in the culture medium. In addition, acyl-ACP thioesterase activity assays in E. coli lysates revealed that there was a preference for palmitoyl-ACP over oleoyl-ACP in vitro, indicating that the cotton putative FatB cDNA encoded a functional thioesterase with a preference for saturated acyl-ACPs over unsaturated acyl-ACPs (FatA). Overexpression of the FatB cDNA in transgenic cotton resulted in elevated levels of palmitic acid in transgenic somatic embryos compared to control embryos. Expression of the anti-sense FatB cDNA in transgenic cotton plants produced some plants with a dwarf phenotype. These plants had significantly smaller mature leaves, all with smaller cells, suggesting that these plants may have less palmitic acid available for incorporation into extraplastidial membrane lipids during cell expansion. Thus manipulation of FatB expression in cotton directly influenced palmitic acid levels. Collectively, data presented in this dissertation support the hypothesis that there indeed is a palmitoyl-ACP thioesterase in cotton, encoded by the isolated FatB cDNA, which plays ...
Date: August 2001
Creator: Huynh, Tu T
Partner: UNT Libraries

Community cotton production.

Description: Recommends and describes the "one-variety community method" of cotton production, in which a community limits itself to growing a single variety of cotton in order to produce a uniform product.
Date: 1938
Creator: Cook, O. F. (Orator Fuller), 1867-1949. & Martin, R. D. (Robert Doane), 1896-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 55

Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Poultry Manure, Early Onions in the Southwest, Oleander Poisoning of Live Stock, Fermented Cottonseed Meal for Hogs, Wintering Farm Work Horses, Alfalfa Meal as a Feeding Stuff, Mangels for Milch Cows, Records of Dairy Herds, Skim-Milk Buttermilk, Whipped Cream, Farm Butter Making, Camembert Cheese Making, Cement and Concrete Fence Posts.
Date: 1910
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 34

Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: American Sugar-Beet Seed, Stimulants for Seeds, Profits from Spraying Potatoes, Winter-Injured Fruit Trees, Durum Wheat, Fertility of Eggs, Indoor Versus Outdoor Feeding of Steers, Roughage for Steers, Cheap Dairy Rations, and Cottonseed Meal for Hogs.
Date: 1906
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 17

Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Distilled Drinking Water, Soil Inoculation, Treatment of Sandy Soils, Lime as a Fertilizer, Fertilizers for Market-Garden Crops, Pecan Culture, Weed Destruction, Maple Syrup and Sugar, Value of Cotton Seed, Alfalfa Silage, Forage Crops for Pigs, Grazing Steers, and Type of the Dairy Cow.
Date: 1901
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 46

Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Fish Fertilizer, Reclamation of Salt Marshes, Bermuda Hay, Protein Content of Forage Crops, Quality in Wheat, Potato Spraying, Anesthetics in Forcing Plants, Fattening Cattle for Market, Cottonseed Meal and Corn Silage for Cows, Carbonated Milk, and Preservation of Fence Posts.
Date: 1908
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Postcard from George Stewart to John Stewart, April 30, 1899]

Description: This is a document from the Charles B. Moore Collection. It is written by George Stewart and is addressed to John Stewart. In this postcard, Stewart discusses the goings-on in Johnson County in Texas. The news includes: updates on his and the family's well-being, a discussion about the planting of cottonseed, details about the grasshoppers eating all the wheat and mostly all of the corn, a message to Bill Evans about renting land, and updates about correspondences received. He closes the letter by noting that should John write soon with all the news.
Date: April 30, 1899
Creator: Stewart, George
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[News Script: Review -- Truck fire]

Description: Script from the WBAP-TV station in Fort Worth, Texas, covering a news story about a transport truck that overturned and caught fire on a Fort Worth highway. The driver escaped with minor injuries.
Date: November 2, 1957
Creator: WBAP-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Vegetable oils: liquid coolants for solar heating and cooling applications

Description: It has been proposed that vegetable oils, renewable byproducts of agriculture processes, be investigated for possible use as liquid coolants. The major thrust of the project was to investigate several thermophysical properties of the four vegetable oils selected. Vapor pressures, specific heat, viscosity, density, and thermal conductivity were determined over a range of temperatures for corn, soybean, peanut, and cottonseed oil. ASTM standard methods were used for these determinations. In addition, chemical analyses were performed on samples of each oil. The samples were collected before and after each experiment so that any changes in composition could be noted. The tests included iodine number, fatty acid, and moisture content determination. (MHR)
Date: February 1, 1980
Creator: Ingley, H A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hybrid fuels for highway transportation. Second annual technical progress report for the period 1 June 1979-1 June 1980

Description: A program has been developed to investigate the potential of hybrid fuels for use in highway transportation. Hybrids are fuels derived from combinations of readily available energetic non-conventional materials with petroleum. They are generally formulated as solutions, emulsions, or slurries. The underlying objective of the program is to reduce the use of petroleum-derived fuels and/or to minimize the processing requirements of the finished hybrid fuels. During the first year of the program, extensive work was done on the development and testing of water and alcohol emulsions and alcohol solutions. In the second year, the emphasis was placed on the development and testing of hybrid fuel slurries. Components evaluated included carbohydrates and various forms of carbon. It was concluded that, of the slurries tested, the carbon (coke, carbon black, etc.) slurries have the most potential for development into finished fuels. The efforts during the third year will concentrate on advancing the development of the slurries (especially the carbon slurries) to the same point as the solutions and emulsions. This work will include examination of the mechanical difficulties, the stability problems, and the combustion phenomena observed when using slurries in heat engines.
Date: June 1, 1980
Creator: Ryan, T.W.; Likos, W. & Moses, C.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department