224 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

The impact of process parameters on gold elimination from soldered connector assemblies

Description: Minimizing the likelihood of solder joint embrittlement in connectors is realized by reducing or eliminating retained Au plating and/or Au-Sn intermetallic compound formation from the assemblies. Gold removal is performed most effectively by using a double wicking process. When only a single wicking procedure can be used, a higher soldering temperature improves the process of Au removal from the connector surfaces and to a nominal extent, removal of Au-contaminated solder from the joint. A longer soldering time did not appear to offer any appreciable improvement toward removing the Au-contaminated solder from the joint. Because the wicking procedure was a manual process, it was operator dependent.
Date: February 2, 2000
Creator: VIANCO,PAUL T. & KILGO,ALICE C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SI PC104 Performance Test Report

Description: The Spectral Instruments (SI) PC104 systems associated with the SI-1000 CCD camera exhibited intermittent power problems during setup, test and operations which called for further evaluation and testing. The SI PC104 System is the interface between the SI-1000 CCD camera and its associated Diagnostic Controller (DC). As such, the SI PC104 must be a reliable, robust system capable of providing consistent performance in various configurations and operating conditions. This SI PC104 system consists of a stackable set of modules designed to meet the PC104+ Industry Standard. The SI PC104 System consists of a CPU module, SI Camera card, Media converter card, Video card and a I/O module. The root cause of power problems was identified as failing solder joints at the LEMO power connector attached to the SI Camera Card. The recommended solution was to provide power to the PC104 system via a PC104+ power supply module configured into the PC104 stack instead of thru the LEMO power connector. Test plans (2) were developed to test SI PC104 performance and identify any outstanding issues noted during extended operations. Test Plan 1 included performance and image acquisition tests. Test Plan 2 verified performance after implementing recommendations. Test Plan 2 also included verifying integrity of system files and driver installation after bootup. Each test plan was implemented to fully test against each set of problems noted. Test Plan presentations and Test Plan results are attached as appendices. Anticipated test results will show successful operation and reliable performance of the SI PC104 system receiving its power via a PC104 power supply module. A SI PC104 Usage Recommendation Memo will be sent out to the SI PC104 User Community. Recommendation memo(s) are attached as appendices.
Date: December 16, 2005
Creator: Montelongo, S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lightning Arrestor Connectors Production Readiness

Description: The Lightning Arrestor Connector (LAC), part “M”, presented opportunities to improve the processes used to fabricate LACs. The A## LACs were the first production LACs produced at the KCP, after the product was transferred from Pinnellas. The new LAC relied on the lessons learned from the A## LACs; however, additional improvements were needed to meet the required budget, yield, and schedule requirements. Improvement projects completed since 2001 include Hermetic Connector Sealing Improvement, Contact Assembly molding Improvement, development of a second vendor for LAC shells, general process improvement, tooling improvement, reduction of the LAC production cycle time, and documention of the LAC granule fabrication process. This report summarizes the accomplishments achieved in improving the LAC Production Readiness.
Date: October 20, 2008
Creator: Marten, Steve; Linder, Kim; Emmons, Jim; Gomez, Antonio; Hasam, Dawud & Maurer, Michelle
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High Voltage Connector

Description: The originally designed high voltage connectors were to be made of brass. However, if treated like a Bellevile spring with the initially given dimensions, the stresses of the connector when crimped were calculated to be much higher than the yield stress of brass. Since the flange and outer diameters of the connector are to remain small, it was necessary to alter the other dimensions and choice of material in order to bring down the stresses applied to the connector.
Date: March 6, 1987
Creator: Kurita, C.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Four in. three jaw type connector suitable for vertical mounting sample for job 11

Description: As authorized by purchase order No. 11-2532 dated March 11, 1949 of the Kellex Corp., the first sample of a 4 inch three jaw type connector for Job 11 was fabricated. The design of the connector was per Crane Co. drawing DR-25126-D except vertical mounting. The materials were per Crane Co. drawing A-24491-C. As instructed in verbal conversation with Dr. D.D. Jacobus and as requested in Mr. J.J. Cuniffe`s letter of May 6, 1949, and Ingersoll-Rand Company`s 1 1/4 inch 534 impact wrench with suitable socket to fit the hexagon head of the operating screw of the 4 inch connector was procured on loan to make some preliminary tests. Engineering drawings are listed in a second report on the data base.
Date: July 8, 1949
Creator: Grubbe, A.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A flexible package and interconnects for microfluidic systems

Description: A slide-together compression package and microfluidic interconnects for microfabricated devices requiring fluidic and electrical connections is presented. The package assembles without tools, is reusable, and requires no epoxy, wirebonds, or solder, making chip replacement fast and easy. The microfluidic interconnects use standard HPLC PEEK tubing, with the tip machined to accept either an o-ring or custom molded ring which serves the dual function of forming the seal and providing mechanical retention strength. One design uses a screw to compress the o-ring, while others are simply plugged into a cartridge retained in the package. The connectors are helium leak-tight, can withstand hundreds of psi, are easy to connect and disconnect, are low dead volume, have a small footprint, and are adaptable to a broad range of microfabricated devices.
Date: January 1, 1999
Creator: Benett, W & Krulevitch, P
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary of EC Superelement Results for OH Inter-Module Connecting Forces

Description: The purpose of this report is to summarize the OH module connecting forces found as a result of the super-element modeling of the EC internal module structure. Although not presented here, this approach can also provide MH connecting forces and assembly deflections. This report includes only information on the OH connecting forces for various assumed connector schemes. The super-element machinery is in place to model other connector ideas, and provide information on overall deflections, MH connecting forces, and primary module stresses.
Date: May 26, 1987
Creator: Wands, R.; Weber, K. & Zurawski, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

D0 Cryo CC Heater Installation

Description: Nine pairs of heaters are installed in the bottom of the CC pressure vessel.The physical layout is shown in the CC internal development drawing, D0 dwg. 3740.510-ME-255523. Electrically the heater system is a delta configuration. Electrical details are found on D0 dwg. 3740.515EC-273761. The feedthrough connectors for power to the heaters are located in the instrumentation box. Connector positions are found on D0 dwg.3740.515-EC-273760. Original sketches for the above named drawings are included in this document. The heaters and wiring were cleaned various times prior to and after installation with ethyl a1chohol. At various stages in the installation hi-pot and continuity tests were successfully accomplished to verify the integrity of the system. The fmal hi-pot numbers are included in the documentation. The heaters and wiring are kept separated from thermometry and purity cell wiring by SS sheetmetal barriers. The fabrication, testing and installation was completed by M. Hentges and his crew from AD/Cryo.
Date: March 16, 1991
Creator: Urbin, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

D0 Silicon Upgrade: CTF Front End Crate J2/J3 BAckplane Specification

Description: GENERAL PHYSICAL LAYOUT: (1) The backplane is comprised of 2 identical sections, the upper half designated J1, and the lower half designated j3; (2) For each section, there are a total of 16 slots, designated 1 through 16, from left to right; (3) Odd numbered slots are left handed (Connectors to the left of the card), these slots utilize inverse DIN connectors; (4) Even numbered slots are right handed (Connectors to the right of the card), these slots utilize standard DIN connectors; (5) There are 2 60 pin daisy-chain headers associated with each section, 3M part number 3597-6003; (6) The headers associated with the J2 (upper) section are designated J2CHAINR and J2CHAINL; (7) The headers associated with the J3 (lower) section are designated J3CHAINL and J3CHAINR; and (8) Mechanical layout presented in drawing number 3823.113-MD-330045. TRIGGER SIGNALS: (1) There are 21 trigger signal which originate from a given slot and are routed to the slot immediately to the left and 21 trigger signals which originate from a given slot and are routed to the slot immediately to the right; (2) There are 21 trigger signals which originate from the slot immediately to the left of a given slot and 21 trigger signals which originate from the slot immediately to the right a given slot; (3) The signal are designated TRIGjk-n, when j is the source slot, k is the destination slot, and n is the signal number; (4) These signals shall be implemented as 100 ohm microstip above ground plane; and (5) No terminations. DC POWER: (1) Each slot is supplied with DC power on the connector pins designated as VCC and GND; (2) VCC and GND originates at rear of the backplane via press-in power terminals, their locations are shown in drawing number 3823.113-MD-330045; (3) Power shall be bypassed ...
Date: July 3, 1995
Creator: Baert, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

STUDY OF THE RHIC BPM SMA CONNECTOR FAILURE PROBLEM

Description: About 730 BPMs are mounted on the RHIC CQS and Triplet super-conducting magnets. Semi-rigid coaxial cables are used to bring the electrical signal from the BPM feedthroughs to the outside flanges. at the ambient temperature. Every year around 10 cables will lose their signals during the operation. The connection usually failed at the warm end of the cable. The problems were either the solder joint failed or the center conductor retracted out of the SMA connector. Finite element analyses were performed to understand the failure mechanism of the solder joint. The results showed that (1) The SMA center conductor can separate from the mating connector due to the thermal retraction. (2) The maximum thermal stress at the warm end solder joint can exceed the material strength of the Pb37/Sn63 solder material and (3) The magnet ramping frequency (-10 Hz), during the machine startup, can possibly resonant the coaxial cable and damage the solder joints, especially when a fracture is initiated. Test results confirmed that by using the silver bearing solder material (a higher strength material) and by crimping the cable at the locations close to the SMA connector (to prevent the center conductor from retracting) can effectively resolve the connector failure problem.
Date: June 25, 2007
Creator: LIAW,C.; SIKORA, R. & SCHROEDER, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Checkout of the Beam-Line's Beam Position Measurement Systems

Description: This pbar note is to describe a recent checkout of the AP3, AP2, AP1 and P2 (F11 to F17) Beam Position Measurement (BPM) systems. The integrity of all BPMs (plates, cables, connectors and RF module) were performed. For each beam-line, the BPM positions polarity were checked: all of the horizontal (vertical) BPMs of a beam-line are to be consistent in defining left/right (up/down) by the sign of the position. The plates impedances have been measured. The position offsets at the output of the RF modules due to cable and connector differences were determined. Anytime an Energy Doubler BPM RF module (EE-107660) was found not working, a working spare was inserted; three AP2 RF modules were replaced. One connector for one of the cables of BPM728 was repaired. Two new cables were pulled and terminated for BPM716 since there was >8dB difference between the cables. In addition, three digitizer boards were replaced.
Date: March 15, 2001
Creator: Gollwitzer, Keith
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dimensions and Measurements of Debuncher Band 1 and 2 Waveguide-Coax Launchers (Final Version)

Description: This note is a document about dimensions and measurement results of waveguide-coax launchers (Band 1 and 2) installed on the arrays in debuncher cooling upgrade. Shown in Figure 1, 5, 8 and 12 are schematic drawings of launchers in the cross section along the longitudinal direction (beam direction) of the arrays. The unit in these drawings is inch. Note: although there are upper band and lower band for pickup arrays, the launchers are the same to avoid possible confusion during installation. RF Measurements were made on all launchers (port) and printed in hard copies for future reference. Since the measurement results are similar to each other, only a few plots for each type of launcher/band are presented in this document. There are two types of measured S11 parameters. One is the measurement made at the end of design/tuning stage using a straight section of band 1 or 2 waveguide terminated with a cone of absorber. I use 'Original' to denote this kind of measurement. As shown in Figure 2, 6, 9 and 13, the original S11 of all launchers are below or around - 20 db over the full band 1 or 2. The other type of measurement is the one made after these launchers were installed onto the array including elbows and several type N feedthrough or connectors. The kicker arrays were terminated with wedges of absorber. During all measurements (pickup array or kicker array) when one launcher was being measured, all other launchers were terminated with 50 ohm terminator. As shown in Figure 3, 4, 7, 10, 11 and 14 these 'final' S11s are around -15 db.
Date: February 15, 2000
Creator: Sun, Ding
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dimensions and Measurements of Debuncher Band 3 and 4 Waveguide-Coax Launchers

Description: This note is a document about dimensions and measurement results of waveguide-coax launchers (Band 3 and 4) installed on the arrays in debuncher cooling upgrade. Shown in Figure 1 and 5 are schematic drawings of launchers (pick-up) in the cross section along the longitudinal direction (beam direction) of the arrays. The unit in these drawings is inch. Note: although there are upper band and lower band for pickup arrays, the launchers are the same to avoid possible confusion during installation. Launchers for band 3 and 4 kickers were made by Penn-engineering Inc., therefor no schematic drawings are presented in this note. RF Measurements were made on all launchers (port) and printed in hard copies for future reference. Since the measurement results are similar to each other, only a few plots for each type of launcher/band are presented in this document. There are two types of measured S11 parameters. One is the measurement made at the end of design/tuning stage using a launcher and a straight section of band 3 or 4 waveguide terminated with a cone of absorber. I use 'Original' to denote this kind of measurement. As shown in Figure 2, 6, 9 and 12, the original S11 of all launchers are below or around -20 db over the full band 3 or 4. The other type of measurement is the one made after these launchers were installed onto the array including several type N feedthrough or connectors, elbows, waveguide bends (kicker) and magic Ts (kicker) etc. The kicker arrays were terminated with wedges of absorber. During all measurements (pickup array or kicker array) when one launcher was being measured, all other launchers were terminated with 50 ohm terminator. As shown in Figure 3, 4, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13 and 14 these 'final' S11s are around -15 db.
Date: September 13, 2000
Creator: Sun, Ding
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

D0-EC RTD Wiring Layout (North Calorimeter)

Description: The temperature of the North End-Calorimeter of the D-Zero detector is to be monitored by several RTD temperature sensors. The location and other important information pertaining to each individual RTD is included in the following tables, which are grouped by bundle number. There are mne 60 pIll port connectors. Each connector corresponds to a bundle of twisted pairs. Twisted pairs, of one of eight colors along with either a black or white wire, run to 10-pin connectors which have a mate on the module or cryostat wall. In general, all 60 pins, or all 10 pins are not used. The color scheme of the wires was designed so that all the twisted pairs with white run West from the instrumentation port, and twisted pairs with black run East. This scheme proved to be very successful and efficient during the installation process. After being installed, every RTD connection was checked and their corresponding resistances were recorded by Jerry Blazey. All the RTD's tested successfully, except for 2. The 2 dead RTD's were: Channel 17 on bundle 4, which is located on the front of MH module 8L; and Channel 13 on bundle 5, which is located on the Bottom of the Middle Coarse Plate of the IH.
Date: June 4, 1991
Creator: Primdahl, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

D0-EC RTD Wiring Layout (South Calorimter)

Description: The temperature of the South End-Calorimeter of the D-Zero detector is to be monitored by several RTD temperature sensors. The location and other important information pertaining to each individual RTD is included in the following tables, which are grouped by bundle number. There are nine 60 pin port connectors. Each connector corresponds to a bundle of twisted pairs. Twisted pairs, of one of eight colors along with either a black or white wire, run to 10-pin connectors which have a mate on the module or cryostat wall. In general, all 60 pins, or all 10 pins are not used. The color scheme of the wires was deSigned so that all the twisted pairs with white run West from the instrumentation port, and twisted pairs with black run East. This scheme proved to be very successful and efficient during the installation process. After being installed, every RTD connection was checked and their corresponding resistances were recorded by Jerry Blazey. All the ATD's tested successfully, except for 4. The 4 dead RTD's were: Channel 12 on bundle 1, which is located on the back of OH module 7R; Channel 19 on bundle 4, which is located on the back of MH module 5L; Channel 9 on bundle 5, which is located on the IH fine 2-inch strap; and Channel 25 on bundle 7, which is located on the east strongback.
Date: August 6, 1991
Creator: Leibfritz, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SVX Sequence Crate Custom J1 Backplane

Description: The Custom J1 Backplane is a full length (21 slot) user specified custom 3U backplane to be used in the J1 position. Slot spacing is identical to that used for VME (0.8-inch), and each backplane shall fit into a standard Eurocard VME style crate. The purpose of the Custom J1 Backplane is to: (1) Provide +5 volt power to slots 1 through 21; (2) Provide -5.2 volt power to slots 1 through 21; (3) Provide five bits of geographic addressing to slots 2 through 21. Slot 2 will have all five bits pulled low; slot 21 will have the value 10100. See Appendix A; (4) Route a differential 1553 signal from a triaxial bulkhead connector to slots 2 through 11. This differential signal is bussed as a daisy chain. A 75 ohm resistor to ground shall be located near the last destination slot for each of these two signals; (5) Route a second differential 1553 signal from a triaxial bulkhead connector to slots 12 through 21. This differential signal is bussed as a daisy chain. A 75 ohm resistor to ground shall be located near the last destination slot for each of these two signals; (6) Route two NRZ signals and two Clock signals from slot 1 to each of slots 2 through 21. These are individual signals, not bussed.
Date: October 29, 1997
Creator: Utes, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SVX Sequence Crate Custom J2/J3 Backplane

Description: The Custom J2/J3 Backplane is a full length (21 slot) user specified custom 3U backplane to be used in both the J2 and J3 positions. Slot spacing is identical to that used for VME (0.8-inch), and each backplane shall fit into a standard Eurocard VME style crate. The purpose of the Custom J2/J3 Backplane is to send and receive control and clock signals from the SVX chips via 3M pleated foil cables (Slots 2-21), and in slot 1, accept a cable connector and route its signal through to a signal distribution board.
Date: October 23, 1997
Creator: Utes, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laser tabbed die: A repairable, high-speed die-interconnection technology. 1994 LDRD final report 93-SR-089

Description: A unique technology for multichip module production is presented. The technology, called Laser Tabbed Die (L-TAB), consists of a method for forming surface-mount-type {open_quotes}gull wing{close_quotes} interconnects on bare dice. The dice are temporarily bonded to a sacrificial substrate which has a polymer thin film coated onto it. The gull wings are formed on the side of the die with a direct-write laser patterning process which allows vertical as well as horizontal image formation. Using the laser patterning system, trenches are formed in a positive electrodeposited photoresist (EDPR) which is plated onto a metal seed layer, allowing copper to be electroplated through the resultant mask. After stripping the resist and the metal seed layer, the polymer film on the substrate is dissolved, releasing the chip with the {open_quotes}gull wings{close_quotes} intact. The chips are then bonded onto a circuit board or permanent substrate with solder or conductive adhesive.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Malba, V. & Bernhardt, A.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Description of a solder pulse generator for the single step formation of ball grid arrays

Description: The traditional geometry for surface mount devices is the peripheral array where the leads are on the edges of the device. As the technology drives towards high input/output (I/O) count (increasing number of leads) and smaller packages with finer pitch (less distance between peripheral leads), limitations on peripheral surface mount devices arise. The leads on these fine pitch devices are fragile and can be easily bent. It becomes increasingly difficult to deliver solder past to leads spaced as little as 0.012 inch apart. Too much solder mass can result in bridging between leads while too little solder can contribute to the loss of mechanical and electrical continuity. A solution is to shift the leads from the periphery of the device to the area under the device. This scheme is called areal array packaging and is exemplified by the ball grid array (BGA) package. A system has been designed and constructed to deposit an entire array of several hundred uniform solder droplets onto a printed circuit board in a fraction of a second. The solder droplets wet to the interconnect lands on a pc board and forms a basis for later application of a BGA device. The system consists of a piezoelectric solder pulse unit, heater controls, an inert gas chamber and an analog power supply/pulse unit.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Schmale, D.T.; Frear, D.R.; Yost, F.G. & Essien, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Micromachined VLSI 3D electronics. Final report for period September 1, 2000 - March 31, 2001

Description: The phase I program investigated the construction of electronic interconnections through the thickness of a silicon wafer. The novel aspects of the technology are that the length-to-width ratio of the channels is as high as 100:1, so that the minimum amount of real estate is used for contact area. Constructing a large array of these through-wafer interconnections will enable two circuit die to be coupled on opposite sides of a silicon circuit board providing high speed connection between the two.
Date: March 31, 2001
Creator: Beetz, C.P.; Steinbeck, J. & Hsueh, K.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department