149 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Some experimental heating data on convex and concave hemispherical nose shapes and hemispherical depressions on a 30-degree blunted nose cone

Description: Report discussing heat data obtained on concave and convex hemispherical nose shapes and hemispherical depressions on a blunted 30-degree nose cone at a variety of Mach numbers. Both hot-jet tests and flight tests were carried out.
Date: March 10, 1958
Creator: Hopko, Russell N. & Strass, H. Kurt
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

On Point Designs for High Gain Fast Ignition

Description: Fast ignition research has reached the stage where point designs are becoming crucial to the identification of key issues and the development of projects to demonstrate high gain fast ignition. The status of point designs for cone coupled electron fast ignition and some of the issues they highlight are discussed.
Date: September 27, 2007
Creator: Key, M; Akli, K; Beg, F; Betti, R; Clark, D S; Chen, S N et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The use of cones as stabilizing and control surfaces at hypersonic speeds

Description: Report discussing the use of cones as stabilizing and control surfaces, which seems to be promising. Information about preliminary considerations, range of cone angles of probable interest, effects of Mach number on the shift in lift advantage from flat plate to cone, comparison of cone with more competitive lifting surfaces, and comparison in terms of producing the same restoring force for complete configuration is presented.
Date: August 12, 1957
Creator: Love, Eugene S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plan of Study for the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain Regional Aquifer System Analysis

Description: Abstract: Sediments of Cretaceous to Holocene age compose the Northern Atlantic Coastal Plain aquifer system in an area of 50,000 square miles from North Carolina to New York. The aquifer system is the principal source of water supply for most of the area. About 1.4 billion gallons are withdrawn each day. Increasing pumpage has create~ problems such as declining water levels, saltwater intrusion, and land subsidence. The U.S. Geological Survey has begun a comprehensive study of the aquifer system that will define the geology, hydrology, and geochemistry of the system. The effects of future utilization of the aquifer system will be determined and alternative water withdrawal plans will be evaluated through computer simulation modeling. This report describes the objectives, organization, and work plans of the study.
Date: April 1980
Creator: Meisler, Harold
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Snowmass 2001: Jet energy flow project

Description: Conventional cone jet algorithms arose from heuristic considerations of LO hard scattering coupled to independent showering. These algorithms implicitly assume that the final states of individual events can be mapped onto a unique set of jets that are in turn associated with a unique set of underlying hard scattering partons. Thus each final state hadron is assigned to a unique underlying parton. The Jet Energy Flow (JEF) analysis described here does not make such assumptions. The final states of individual events are instead described in terms of flow distributions of hadronic energy. Quantities of physical interest are constructed from the energy flow distribution summed over all events. The resulting analysis is less sensitive to higher order perturbative corrections and the impact of showering and hadronization than the standard cone algorithms.
Date: December 5, 2002
Creator: al., C. F. Berger et
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Liguefaction Evaluations at the Savannah River Site a Case History

Description: Over the past decade, liquefaction assessments have been performed for many existing and planned critical facilities at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). The assessments incorporated site-specific Cyclic Resistance Ratio (CRR) and K with the use of the cone penetration test (CPT). The SRS-specific CRR and K were developed from laboratory testing of carefully collected samples. Test results show SRS soils have increased liquefaction resistance of two to three times when compared to standard literature for Holocene-age deposits. This increase in strength can be attributed to many factors such as aging and overconsolidation. The purpose of this paper is to discuss liquefaction methodologies used at the SRS. Specifically, (1) use of the CPT and correlations of CPT-derived results with that of high-quality undisturbed samples; (2) aging; and (3) K vertical confining stress factor.
Date: September 23, 2003
Creator: McHood, M.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Completion of Hanford Tanks Initiative characterization milestone T04-98-523

Description: The HTI subsurface characterization task will use the Hanford Cone Penetrometer platform (CPP) to deploy soil sensor and sampling probes into the vadose zone/soils around AX-104 during FY-99. This document provides copies of the first data collected from the HTI sensor probes during vendor field developmental tests performed at a Cold test site in the Hanford 200 East area. Conduct of the initial test also established completion of a major contractor milestone of the HTI Characterization task (MS T04-98-523: Complete preparation of the HTICP probes and transfer to Hanford/HTI. Conduct an initial MSP push using the CPP).
Date: October 23, 1998
Creator: IWATATE, D.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HTI CONE PENETROMETER PROBES PREPARATION DEVELOPMENTAL TESTING REPORT

Description: The HTI subsurface characterization task will use the Hanford Cone Penetrometer platform (CPP) to deploy soil sensor and sampling probes into the vadose zone/soils around AX-104 during FY-99. This report provides the data and information compiled during vendor field development tests and laboratory/bench checkout. This document is a vendor deliverable item identified in the ARA Statement of Work HNF-2881, Revision 1. This version of the DTR includes to-be-determined items and some incomplete sections. The Rev. 0 is being released to support the concurrent task of procedure preparation and Qualification Test Plan preparation. Revision 1 is planned to contain all data and information.
Date: October 26, 1998
Creator: Iwatate, D. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nail-like targets for laser plasma interaction experiments

Description: The interaction of ultra-high power picosecond laser pulses with solid targets is of interest both for benchmarking the results of hybrid particle in cell (PIC) codes and also for applications to re-entrant cone guided fast ignition. We describe the construction of novel targets in which copper/titanium wires are formed into 'nail-like' objects by a process of melting and micromachining, so that energy can be reliably coupled to a 24 {micro}m diameter wire. An extreme-ultraviolet image of the interaction of the Titan laser with such a target is shown.
Date: December 18, 2007
Creator: Pasley, J; Wei, M; Shipton, E; Chen, S; Ma, T; Beg, F N et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Automating Shallow Seismic Imaging

Description: This seven-year, shallow-seismic reflection research project had the aim of improving geophysical imaging of possible contaminant flow paths. Thousands of chemically contaminated sites exist in the United States, including at least 3,700 at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Imaging technologies such as shallow seismic reflection (SSR) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) sometimes are capable of identifying geologic conditions that might indicate preferential contaminant-flow paths. Historically, SSR has been used very little at depths shallower than 30 m, and even more rarely at depths of 10 m or less. Conversely, GPR is rarely useful at depths greater than 10 m, especially in areas where clay or other electrically conductive materials are present near the surface. Efforts to image the cone of depression around a pumping well using seismic methods were only partially successful (for complete references of all research results, see the full Final Technical Report, DOE/ER/14826-F), but peripheral results included development of SSR methods for depths shallower than one meter, a depth range that had not been achieved before. Imaging at such shallow depths, however, requires geophone intervals of the order of 10 cm or less, which makes such surveys very expensive in terms of human time and effort. We also showed that SSR and GPR could be used in a complementary fashion to image the same volume of earth at very shallow depths. The primary research focus of the second three-year period of funding was to develop and demonstrate an automated method of conducting two-dimensional (2D) shallow-seismic surveys with the goal of saving time, effort, and money. Tests involving the second generation of the hydraulic geophone-planting device dubbed the ''Autojuggie'' showed that large numbers of geophones can be placed quickly and automatically and can acquire high-quality data, although not under rough topographic conditions. In some easy-access environments, this device could ...
Date: December 9, 2004
Creator: Steeples, Don W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey Map of Part of the Southwest Nevada Volcanic Field

Description: A high-resolution aeromagnetic survey was recently flown to collect data for geologic investigations in the Southwest Nevada Volcanic Field. This survey represents a marked improvement over previous (1999) surveys. The survey includes over 860 km{sup 2} covered by nearly 16,000 km of flightline with 60-m spacing and an instrument altitude of 30 m above the ground surface. Features of interest visible in the dataset include magnetic banding in the volcanic tuffs that form the faulted terrain and sharp delineation of Quaternary basalt cinder cones and lava flows. This 1:100,000-scale map includes a shaded-relief map base and a semi-transparent overlay of the aeromagnetic data, with inset maps illustrating (1) comparisons of detail between the 1999 and 2004 datasets, (2) polarity reversal banding in the volcanic tuff ridges, (3) details of the morphology of Quaternary basalt centers enhanced by aeromagnetic data, and (4) use of GIS in planning the survey.
Date: June 21, 2004
Creator: Keating, G.; Prueitt, R. & Cogbill, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Scoria Cone Construction Mechanism, Lathrop Wells Volcano, Southern Nevada

Description: Scoria cones are commonly assumed to have been constructed by the accumulation of ballistically-ejected clasts from discrete and relatively coarse-grained Strombolian bursts and subsequent avalanching such that the cone slopes are at or near the angle of repose for loose scoria. The cone at the hawaiitic Lathrop Wells volcano, southern Nevada, contains deposits that are consistent with the above processes during early cone-building phases; these early deposits are composed mainly of coarse lapilli and fluidal bombs and are partially welded, indicating relatively little cooling during flight. However, the bulk of the cone is comprised of relatively fine-grained (ash and lapilli), planar beds with no welding, even within a few tens of meters of the vent. This facies is consistent with deposition by direct fallout from sustained eruption columns of relatively well-fragmented material, primarily mantling cone slopes and with a lesser degree of avalanching than is commonly assumed. A laterally extensive fallout deposit (up to 20 km from the vent) is inferred to have formed contemporaneously with these later cone deposits. This additional mechanism for construction of scoria cones may also be important at other locations, particularly where the magmas are relatively high in volatile content and where conditions promote the formation of abundant microlites in the rising mafic magma.
Date: January 18, 2005
Creator: Valentine, G.; Krier, D.; Perry, F. & Heiken, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

3D reconstruction of tensors and vectors

Description: Here we have developed formulations for the reconstruction of 3D tensor fields from planar (Radon) and line-integral (X-ray) projections of 3D vector and tensor fields. Much of the motivation for this work is the potential application of MRI to perform diffusion tensor tomography. The goal is to develop a theory for the reconstruction of both Radon planar and X-ray or line-integral projections because of the flexibility of MRI to obtain both of these type of projections in 3D. The development presented here for the linear tensor tomography problem provides insight into the structure of the nonlinear MRI diffusion tensor inverse problem. A particular application of tensor imaging in MRI is the potential application of cardiac diffusion tensor tomography for determining in vivo cardiac fiber structure. One difficulty in the cardiac application is the motion of the heart. This presents a need for developing future theory for tensor tomography in a motion field. This means developing a better understanding of the MRI signal for diffusion processes in a deforming media. The techniques developed may allow the application of MRI tensor tomography for the study of structure of fiber tracts in the brain, atherosclerotic plaque, and spine in addition to fiber structure in the heart. However, the relations presented are also applicable to other fields in medical imaging such as diffraction tomography using ultrasound. The mathematics presented can also be extended to exponential Radon transform of tensor fields and to other geometric acquisitions such as cone beam tomography of tensor fields.
Date: February 17, 2005
Creator: Defrise, Michel & Gullberg, Grant T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Next to leading order three jet production at hadron colliders

Description: I present results from a next-to-leading order event generator of purely gluonic jet production. This calculation is the first step in the construction of a full next-to-leading order calculation of three jet production at hadron colliders. Several jet algorithms commonly used in experiments are implemented and their numerical stability is investigated. A numerical instability is found in the iterative cone algorithm which makes it inappropriate for use in fixed order calculations beyond leading order.
Date: May 15, 1997
Creator: Kilgore, William B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Test Plan for the Demonstration of Geophysical Techniques for Single-Shell Tank Leak Detection at the Hanford Mock Tank Site: Fiscal Year 2001

Description: As part of the Leak Detection, Monitoring and Mitigation (LDMM) program conducted by CH2M HILL 105-A during FY 2001. These tests are being conducted to assess the applicability of these methods (Electrical Resistance Tomography [ERT], High Resolution Resistivity [HRR], Cross-Borehole Seismography [XBS], Cross-Borehole Radar [XBR], and Cross-Borehole Electromagnetic Induction [CEMI]) to the detection and measurement of Single Shell Tank (SST) leaks into the vadose zone during planned sluicing operations. The testing in FY 2001 will result in the selection of up to two methods for further testing in FY 2002. In parallel with the geophysical tests, a Partitioning Interwell Tracer Test (PITT) study will be conducted simultaneously at the Mock Tank to assess the effectiveness of this technology in detecting and quantifying tank leaks in the vadose zone. Preparatory and background work using Cone Penetrometer methods (CPT) will be conducted at the Mock Tank site and an adjacent test area to derive soil properties for groundtruthing purposes for all methods.
Date: July 31, 2001
Creator: Barnett, Brent; Gee, Glendon W & Sweeney, Mark D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Snowmass 2001 : jet energy flow project.

Description: Conventional cone jet algorithms arose from heuristic considerations of LO hard scattering coupled to independent showering. These algorithms implicitly assume that the final states of individual events can be mapped onto a unique set of jets that are in turn associated with a unique set of underlying hard scattering partons. Thus each final state hadron is assigned to a unique underlying parton. The Jet Energy Flow (JEF) analysis described here does not make such assumptions. The final states of individual events are instead described in terms of flow distributions of hadronic energy. Quantities of physical interest are constructed from the energy flow distribution summed over all events. The resulting analysis is less sensitive to higher order perturbative corrections and the impact of showering and hadronization than the standard cone algorithms.
Date: March 25, 2002
Creator: Berger, C. F.; L., Berger. E.; Bhat, P. C.; Butterworth, J. M.; Ellis, S. D.; Flaugher, B. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Cone Jet-Finding Algorithm for Heavy-Ion Collisions at LHCEnergies

Description: Standard jet finding techniques used in elementary particle collisions have not been successful in the high track density of heavy-ion collisions. This paper describes a modified cone-type jet finding algorithm developed for the complex environment of heavy-ion collisions. The primary modification to the algorithm is the evaluation and subtraction of the large background energy, arising from uncorrelated soft hadrons, in each collision. A detailed analysis of the background energy and its event-by-event fluctuations has been performed on simulated data, and a method developed to estimate the background energy inside the jet cone from the measured energy outside the cone on an event-by-event basis. The algorithm has been tested using Monte-Carlo simulations of Pb+Pb collisions at {radical}s = 5.5 TeV for the ALICE detector at the LHC. The algorithm can reconstruct jets with a transverse energy of 50 GeV and above with an energy resolution of {approx} 30%.
Date: July 27, 2006
Creator: Blyth, S.-L.; Horner, M.J.; Awes, T.C.; Cormier, T.; Gray, H.M.; Klay, J.L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cone Penetrometer Off-Surface Sensor

Description: Cone penetrometer technology accounts for approximately 50 percent of the subsurface drilling done at the Savannah River Site. This technology provides a means of collecting data for use in the characterization of the subsurface. The cone penetrometer consists of a steel cone attached to a pipe column that is hydraulically inserted into the ground. To allow researchers to accurately measure subsurface properties, without the inherent problems of cone penetrometer equipment, the Savannah River Technology Center has developed the Cone Penetrometer Off-Surface Sensor (CPOSS). The CPOSS design consists of a knife-blade mechanism mounted along the surface of a module capable of attaching to existing cone penetrometer equipment and being deployed at depths of up to 200 feet. CPOSS development is the subject of this report.
Date: October 20, 1999
Creator: Smail, T.R.; French, p.J.; Huffman, R.K. & Hebert, P.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A/M Area Metallurgical Laboratory: Summary of Phase I Characterization Well Installation, Cone Penetrometer Testing and Soil Coring for Soil Headspace Analysis

Description: This report documents the Phase I characterization of chlorinated solvent contamination in the regulatory-defined uppermost aquifer (includes the M Area, Lost Lake and middle sand aquifer zones) within the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) of the A/M Area.
Date: November 5, 1999
Creator: Van Pelt, R.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

AUTOMATING SHALLOW SEISMIC IMAGING

Description: Our current EMSP project continues an effort begun in 1997 to develop ultrashallow seismic imaging as a cost-effective method applicable to DOE facilities. The objective of the present research is to refine and demonstrate the use of an automated method of conducting shallow seismic surveys--an approach that represents a significant departure from conventional seismic-survey field procedures. Recent tests involving a second-generation mechanical geophone-planting device have shown that large numbers of geophones can be placed quickly and automatically and can acquire good data. In some easy-access environments, this device is expected to make shallow seismic surveying considerably more efficient and less expensive. Another element of our research plan involves monitoring the cone of depression of a pumping well that serves as a proxy location for fluid-flow at a contaminated site. In May 2001, we collected data from a well site at which drawdown equilibrium had been reached. That information is being interpreted and evaluated. The development of noninvasive, in-situ methods such as placing geophones automatically and using near-surface seismic methods alone or in concert with ground-penetrating radar to identify and characterize the hydrologic flow regimes at contaminated sites supports the prospect of developing effective, cost-conscious cleanup strategies for DOE and others.
Date: June 1, 2002
Creator: Steeples, Don W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

AX Tank farm closure settlement estimates and soil testing

Description: This study provides a conservative three-dimensional settlement study of the AX Tank Farm closure with fill materials and a surface barrier. The finite element settlement model constructed included the interaction of four tanks and the surface barrier with the site soil and bedrock. Also addressed are current soil testing techniques suitable for the site soil with recommendations applicable to the AX Tank Farm and the planned cone penetration testing.
Date: March 25, 1999
Creator: BECKER, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford tank initiative cone penetrometer stand alone grouting module

Description: The HTI subsurface characterization task will use the Hanford Cone Penetrometer platform (CPP) to deploy contaminant sensor and soil sampling probes into the vadose zone surrounding SST 241-AX-104. Closure of the resulting penetration holes may be stipulated by WAC requirements. A stand alone grouting capability deployable by the CPP has been developed. This qualification test plan defines testing of this capability to be performed at the Immobilized Low Activity Waste Disposal Complex.
Date: October 15, 1998
Creator: CALLAWAY, W.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford Tanks Initiative cone penetrometer siting plan and progress report

Description: The HTI subsurface characterization task will use the Hanford Cone Penetrometer platform (CPP) to deploy soil sensor and sampling probes into the vadose zone/soils around AX-104 during FY-99. This Siting Plan describes activities and actions undertaken in support of CPP deployment: deployment goals, maps of the deployment sites/locations, pre-activity (siting-related) documentation tasks, a summary of activities that have been completed to date, and an estimated schedule of additional planned activities.
Date: October 15, 1998
Creator: IWATATE, D.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department