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Free form fabrication of metallic components using laser engineered net shaping (LENS{trademark})

Description: Solid free form fabrication is one of the fastest growing automated manufacturing technologies that has significantly impacted the length of time between initial concept and actual part fabrication. Starting with CAD renditions of new components, several techniques such as stereolithography and selective laser sintering are being used to fabricate highly accurate complex three-dimensional concept models using polymeric materials. Coupled with investment casting techniques, sacrificial polymeric objects are used to minimize costs and time to fabricate tooling used to make complex metal castings. This paper will describe recent developments in a new technology, known as LENS{sup {trademark}} (Laser Engineered Net Shaping), to fabricate metal components directly from CAD solid models and thus further reduce the lead times for metal part fabrication. In a manner analogous to stereolithography or selective sintering, the LENS{sup {trademark}} process builds metal parts line by line and layer by layer. Metal particles are injected into a laser beam, where they are melted and deposited onto a substrate as a miniature weld pool. The trace of the laser beam on the substrate is driven by the definition of CAD models until the desired net-shaped densified metal component is produced.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Griffith, M.L.; Keicher, D.M. & Atwood, C.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SixDOF position sensor: enabling manufacturing flexibility

Description: A small, non-contact optical sensor invented by the author attaches to a robot (or other machines), enabling the robot to detect objects, adjust its alignment in all six degrees of freedom (SixDOF), and read a task from a code on the part. Thus, the SixDOF sensor provides robots more intelligence to operate autonomously and adapt to changes without human intervention. A description of the sensor is provided. Also, an operating arrangement of a robot using the SixDOF sensor is presented with performance results described.
Date: March 24, 1998
Creator: Vann, C.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Principles of As-Built Engineering

Description: As-Built Engineering is a product realization methodology founded on the notion that life-cycle engineering should be based on what is actually produced and not on what is nominally designed. As-Built Engineering is a way of thinking about the production realization process that enables customization in mass production environments. It questions the relevance of nominal based methods of engineering and the role that tolerancing plays in product realization. As-Built Engineering recognizes that there will always be errors associated with manufacturing that cannot be controlled and therefore need to be captured in order to fully characterize each individual product`s unique attributes. One benefit of As-Built Engineering is the ability to provide actual product information to designers and analysts enabling them to verify their assumptions using actual part and assembly data. Another benefit is the ability to optimize new and re-engineered assemblies.
Date: November 1, 1996
Creator: Dolin, R.M. & Hefele, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Constraint-based interactive assembly planning

Description: The constraints on assembly plans vary depending on the product, assembly facility, assembly volume, and many other factors. This paper describes the principles and implementation of a framework that supports a wide variety of user-specified constraints for interactive assembly planning. Constraints from many sources can be expressed on a sequencing level, specifying orders and conditions on part mating operations in a number of ways. All constraints are implemented as filters that either accept or reject assembly operations proposed by the planner. For efficiency, some constraints are supplemented with special-purpose modifications to the planner`s algorithms. Replanning is fast enough to enable a natural plan-view-constrain-replan cycle that aids in constraint discovery and documentation. We describe an implementation of the framework in a computer-aided assembly planning system and experiments applying the system to several complex assemblies. 12 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.
Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: Jones, R.E.; Wilson, R.H. & Calton, T.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A collision avoidance system for workpiece protection

Description: This paper describes an application of Sandia`s non-contact capacitive sensing technology for collision avoidance during the manufacturing of rocket engine thrust chambers. The collision avoidance system consists of an octagon shaped collar with a capacitive proximity sensor mounted on each face. The sensors produced electric fields which extend several inches from the face of the collar and detect potential collisions between the robot and the workpiece. A signal conditioning system processes the sensor output and provides varying voltage signals to the robot controller for stopping the robot.
Date: April 1, 1995
Creator: Schmitt, D.J.; Weber, T.M.; Novak, J.L. & Maslakowski, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ultra-Precise Assembly of Micro-Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) Components

Description: This report summarizes a three year effort to develop an automated microassembly workcell for the assembly of LIGA (Lithography Galvonoforming Abforming) parts. Over the last several years, Sandia has developed processes for producing surface machined silicon and LIGA parts for use in weapons surety devices. Some of these parts have outside dimensions as small as 100 micron, and most all have submicron tolerances. Parts this small and precise are extremely difficult to assembly by hand. Therefore, in this project, we investigated the technologies required to develop a robotic workcell to assembly these parts. In particular, we concentrated on micro-grippers, visual servoing, micro-assembly planning, and parallel assembly. Three different micro-grippers were tested: a pneumatic probe, a thermally actuated polysilicon tweezer, and a LIGA fabricated tweezer. Visual servoing was used to accuracy position two parts relative to one another. Fourier optics methods were used to generate synthetic microscope images from CAD drawings. These synthetic images are used off-line to test image processing routines under varying magnifications and depths of field. They also provide reference image features which are used to visually servo the part to the desired position. We also investigated a new aspect of fine motion planning for the micro-domain. As parts approach 1-10 {micro}m or less in outside dimensions, interactive forces such as van der Waals and electrostatic forces become major factors which greatly change the assembly sequence and path plans. We developed the mathematics required to determine the goal regions for pick up, holding, and release of a micro-sphere being handled by a rectangular tool. Finally, we implemented and tested the ability to assemble an array of LIGA parts attached to two 3 inch diameter wafers. In this way, hundreds of parts can be assembled in parallel rather than assembling each part individually.
Date: April 1, 1999
Creator: Feddema, J.T.; Simon, R.; Polosky, M. & Christenson, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rapid space hardware development through computer-automated testing

Description: FORTE, the Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events small satellite designed and built by Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories, is scheduled for launch in August, 1997. In the spirit of {open_quotes}better, cheaper, faster{close_quotes} satellites, the RF experiment hardware (receiver and trigger sub-systems) necessitated rapid prototype testing and characterization in the development of space-flight components. This was accomplished with the assembly of engineering model hardware prior to construction of flight hardware and the design of component-specific, PC-based software control libraries. Using the LabVIEW{reg_sign} graphical programming language, together with off-the-shelf PC digital I/O and GPIB interface cards, hardware control and complete automation of test equipment was possible from one PC. Because the receiver and trigger sub-systems employed complex functions for signal discrimination and transient detection, thorough validation of all functions and illumination of any faults were priorities. These methods were successful in accelerating the development and characterization of space-flight components prior to integration and allowed more complete data to be gathered than could have been accomplished without automation. Additionally, automated control of input signal sources was carried over from bench-level to system-level with the use of networked Linux workstation utilizing a GPIB interface.
Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: Masters, D.S. & Ruud, K.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A CORBA-based manufacturing environment

Description: A CORBA-based distributed object software system was developed for Sandia`s Agile Manufacturing Testbed (SAMT). This information architecture supports the goals of agile manufacturing: rapid response to changing requirements; small lot machining; reduction in both time and cost of the product realization process; and integration within a heterogeneous, wide-area networked enterprise. Features of the resulting software-controlled manufacturing environment are: (1) Easy plug-and-play of manufacturing devices. (2) Support for both automated and manual operations. (3) Information flow both into and out of manufacturing devices. (4) Dynamic task sequencer. Each of the heterogeneous physical objects (lathe, milling machine, robot arm, etc.) has a corresponding software object that supports a common IDL interface called IDevice. This interface provides operations for material processing, material movement, status monitoring, and other administrative tasks. CORBA objects allow for the encapsulation of a machine tool, its controller, and the network interface to the controller. Both manual and automated operations are supported by the software system. If an IDevice object receives a request for a non-automated operation, it uses an associated Console object to affect the operation by communications with a human machinist. A design goal of the Console object for a machine is to provide an information-intensive environment for the machinist, rather than just the transmittal of instructions to be carried out. In addition to the flow of information into manufacturing devices (e.g., control and NC code), the software architecture supports the easy extraction of data (e.g., sensor data or inspection reports) back out of the machine and into the broader information processing environment The task sequencer object dynamically locates devices, accepts jobs, and dispatches tasks in the manufacturing cell. A job script captures setup operations, material movement, and processing.
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Pancerella, C.M.; Whiteside, R.A. & Klevgard, P.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Prospects for chaos control of machine tool chatter

Description: The authors analyze the nonlinear tool-part dynamics during turning of stainless steel in the nonchatter and chatter regimes, toward the ultimate objective of chatter control. Their previous work analyzed tool acceleration in three dimensions at four spindle speeds. In the present work, the authors analyze the machining power and obtain nonlinear measures of this power. They also calculate the cycle-to-cycle energy for the turning process. Return maps for power cycle times do not reveal fixed points or (un)stable manifolds. Energy return maps do display stable and unstable directions (manifolds) to and from an unstable period-1 orbit, which is the dominant periodicity. Both nonchatter and chatter dynamics have the unusual feature of arriving at the unstable period-1 fixed point and departing from that fixed point of the energy return map in a single step. This unusual feature makes chaos maintenance, based on the well-known Ott-Grebogi-Yorke scheme, a very difficult option for chatter suppression. Alternative control schemes, such as synchronization of the tool-part motion to prerecorded nonchatter dynamics or dynamically damping the period-1 motion, are briefly discussed.
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Hively, L.M.; Protopopescu, V.A.; Clapp, N.E. & Daw, C.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Agile manufacturing prototyping system (AMPS)

Description: The Agile Manufacturing Prototyping System (AMPS) is being integrated at Sandia National Laboratories. AMPS consists of state of the industry flexible manufacturing hardware and software enhanced with Sandia advancements in sensor and model based control; automated programming, assembly and task planning; flexible fixturing; and automated reconfiguration technology. AMPS is focused on the agile production of complex electromechanical parts. It currently includes 7 robots (4 Adept One, 2 Adept 505, 1 Staubli RX90), conveyance equipment, and a collection of process equipment to form a flexible production line capable of assembling a wide range of electromechanical products. This system became operational in September 1995. Additional smart manufacturing processes will be integrated in the future. An automated spray cleaning workcell capable of handling alcohol and similar solvents was added in 1996 as well as parts cleaning and encapsulation equipment, automated deburring, and automated vision inspection stations. Plans for 1997 and out years include adding manufacturing processes for the rapid prototyping of electronic components such as soldering, paste dispensing and pick-and-place hardware.
Date: May 9, 1998
Creator: Garcia, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of motion control method for laser soldering process

Description: Development of a method to generate the motion control data for sealing an electronic housing using laser soldering is described. The motion required to move the housing under the laser is a nonstandard application and was performed with a four-axis system using the timed data streaming mode capabilities of a Compumotor AT6400 indexer. A Microsoft Excel 5.0 spreadsheet (named Israuto.xls) was created to calculate the movement of the part under the laser, and macros were written into the spreadsheet to allow the user to easily create this data. A data verification method was developed for simulating the motion data. The geometry of the assembly was generated using Parametric Technology Corporation Pro/E version 15. This geometry was then converted using Pro/DADS version 3.1 from Computer Aided Design Software Inc. (CADSI), and the simulation was carried out using DADS version 8.0 from CADSI.
Date: May 1, 1997
Creator: Yerganian, S.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laser engineered net shaping (LENS) for the fabrication of metallic components

Description: Solid free form fabrication is a fast growing automated manufacturing technology that has reduced the time between initial concept and fabrication. Starting with CAD renditions of new components, techniques such as stereolithography and selective laser sintering are being used to fabricate highly accurate complex 3-D objects using polymers. Together with investment casting, sacrificial polymeric objects are used to minimize cost and time to fabricate tooling used to make complex metal casting. This paper describes recent developments in LENS{trademark} (Laser Engineered Net Shaping) to fabricate the metal components {ital directly} from CAD solid models and thus further reduce the lead time. Like stereolithography or selective sintering, LENS builds metal parts line by line and layer by layer. Metal particles are injected into a laser beam where they are melted and deposited onto a substrate as a miniature weld pool. The trace of the laser beam on the substrate is driven by the definition of CAD models until the desired net-shaped densified metal component is produced.
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: Griffith, M.L.; Keicher, D.L.; Romero, J.A.; Atwood, C.L.; Harwell, L.D.; Greene, D.L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Critics and advisors: Heuristic knowledge and manufacturability

Description: In recent years, much of the progress in Computer-Aided Manufacturing has emphasized the use of simulation, finite-element analysis, and other science-based techniques to plan and evaluate manufacturing processes. These approaches are all based on the idea that we can build sufficiently faithful models of complex manufacturing processes such as machining, welding, and casting. Although there has been considerable progress in this area, it continues to suffer from difficulties: the first of these is that the kind of highly accurate models that this approach requires may take many person months to construct, and the second is the large amount of computing resources needed to run these simulations. Two design advisors, Near Net-Shape Advisor and Design for Machinability Advisor, are being developed to explore the role of heuristic, knowledge-based systems for manufacturing processes, both as an alternative to more analytical techniques, and also in support of these techniques. Currently the advisors are both in the prototype stage. All indications lead to the conclusion that the advisors will be successful and lay the groundwork for additional systems such as these in the future.
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: Rivera, J.J.; Stubblefield, W.A. & Ames, A.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

On Constraints in Assembly Planning

Description: Constraints on assembly plans vary depending on product, assembly facility, assembly volume, and many other factors. Assembly costs and other measures to optimize vary just as widely. To be effective, computer-aided assembly planning systems must allow users to express the plan selection criteria that appIy to their products and production environments. We begin this article by surveying the types of user criteria, both constraints and quality measures, that have been accepted by assembly planning systems to date. The survey is organized along several dimensions, including strategic vs. tactical criteria; manufacturing requirements VS. requirements of the automated planning process itself and the information needed to assess compliance with each criterion. The latter strongly influences the efficiency of planning. We then focus on constraints. We describe a framework to support a wide variety of user constraints for intuitive and efficient assembly planning. Our framework expresses all constraints on a sequencing level, specifying orders and conditions on part mating operations in a number of ways. Constraints are implemented as simple procedures that either accept or reject assembly operations proposed by the planner. For efficiency, some constraints are supplemented with special-purpose modifications to the planner's algorithms. Fast replanning enables an interactive plan-view-constrain-replan cycle that aids in constraint discovery and documentation. We describe an implementation of the framework in a computer-aided assembly planning system and experiments applying the system to a number of complex assemblies, including one with 472 parts.
Date: December 17, 1998
Creator: Calton, T.L.; Jones, R.E. & Wilson, R.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrated evolutionary computation neural network quality controller for automated systems

Description: With increasing competition in the global market, more and more stringent quality standards and specifications are being demands at lower costs. Manufacturing applications of computing power are becoming more common. The application of neural networks to identification and control of dynamic processes has been discussed. The limitations of using neural networks for control purposes has been pointed out and a different technique, evolutionary computation, has been discussed. The results of identifying and controlling an unstable, dynamic process using evolutionary computation methods has been presented. A framework for an integrated system, using both neural networks and evolutionary computation, has been proposed to identify the process and then control the product quality, in a dynamic, multivariable system, in real-time.
Date: June 1, 1999
Creator: Patro, S. & Kolarik, W. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrated product definition representation for agile numerical control applications

Description: Realization of agile manufacturing capabilities for a virtual enterprise requires the integration of technology, management, and work force into a coordinated, interdependent system. This paper is focused on technology enabling tools for agile manufacturing within a virtual enterprise specifically relating to Numerical Control (N/C) manufacturing activities and product definition requirements for these activities.
Date: November 1, 1994
Creator: Simons, W. R. Jr.; Brooks, S. L.; Kirk, W. J. III & Brown, C. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feature-based tolerancing for advanced manufacturing applications

Description: A primary requirement for the successful deployment of advanced manufacturing applications is the need for a complete and accessible definition of the product. This product definition must not only provide an unambiguous description of a product`s nominal shape but must also contain complete tolerance specification and general property attributes. Likewise, the product definition`s geometry, topology, tolerance data, and modeler manipulative routines must be fully accessible through a robust application programmer interface. This paper describes a tolerancing capability using features that complements a geometric solid model with a representation of conventional and geometric tolerances and non-shape property attributes. This capability guarantees a complete and unambiguous definition of tolerances for manufacturing applications. An object-oriented analysis and design of the feature-based tolerance domain was performed. The design represents and relates tolerance features, tolerances, and datum reference frames. The design also incorporates operations that verify correctness and check for the completeness of the overall tolerance definition. The checking algorithm is based upon the notion of satisfying all of a feature`s toleranceable aspects. Benefits from the feature-based tolerance modeler include: advancing complete product definition initiatives, incorporating tolerances in product data exchange, and supplying computer-integrated manufacturing applications with tolerance information.
Date: November 1, 1994
Creator: Brown, C. W.; Kirk, W. J. III; Simons, W. R.; Ward, R. C. & Brooks, S. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Perception of graphic system data base problems and needs from a numerical control programmer's viewpoint

Description: Some needs addressed concerning computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacture include: data base definition rules and three-dimensional data bases; inclusion of concise dimensional, finishing, and other data in textual or attribute form; usable solid modeling capability; better toolpath control; programmable language section of system capable of addressing the whole system data structure; and broader numerical control macro capability. (LEW)
Date: January 1, 1984
Creator: Maier, O.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Amorphous Silicon Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology - Phase 2a. Annual Subcontract Report, May 1, 1993--April 30, 1994

Description: Utility Power Group (UPG), and its lower-tier subcontractor, Advanced Photovoltaic Systems, Inc. (APS) have conducted efforts in developing their manufacturing lines. UPG has focused on the automation of encapsulation and termination processes developed in Phase I. APS has focused on completion of the encapsulation and module design tasks, while continuing the process and quality control and automation projects. The goal is to produce 55 watt (stabilized) EP50 modules in a new facility. In the APS Trenton EUREKA manufacturing facility, APS has: (1) Developed high throughput lamination procedures; (2) Optimized existing module designs; (3) Developed new module designs for architectural applications; (4) Developed enhanced deposition parameter control; (5) Designed equipment required to manufacture new EUREKA modules developed during Phase II; (6) Improved uniformity of thin-film materials deposition; and (7) Improved the stabilized power output of the APS EP50 EUREKA module to 55 watts. In the APS Fairfield EUREKA manufacturing facility, APS has: (1) Introduced the new products developed under Phase I into the APS Fairfield EUREKA module production line; (2) Increased the extent of automation in the production line; (3) Introduced Statistical Process Control to the module production line; and (4) Transferred-progress made in the APS Trenton facility into the APS Fairfield facility.
Date: January 1995
Creator: Duran, G.; Mackamul, K. & Metcalf, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Virtual Optical Comparator

Description: The Virtual Optical Comparator, VOC, was conceived as a result of the limitations of conventional optical comparators and vision systems. Piece part designs for mechanisms have started to include precision features on the face of parts that must be viewed using a reflected image rather than a profile shadow. The VOC concept uses a computer generated overlay and a digital camera to measure features on a video screen. The advantage of this system is superior edge detection compared to traditional systems. No vinyl charts are procured or inspected. The part size and expensive fixtures are no longer a concern because of the range of the X-Y table of the Virtual Optical Comparator. Product redesigns require only changes to the CAD image overlays; new vinyl charts are not required. The inspection process is more ergonomic by allowing the operator to view the part sitting at a desk rather than standing over a 30 inch screen. The procurement cost for the VOC will be less than a traditional comparator with a much smaller footprint with less maintenance and energy requirements.
Date: October 20, 2008
Creator: Thompson, Greg
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Enhanced product realization techniques using as-built and model reconstruction technologies

Description: Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Center for Advanced Engineering Technology has developed a product realization process designed to enhance the complexity and comprehensiveness of the information fed back to the designer after the analytical and manufacturing operations have been completed. This process uses principles of As-Built Engineering and Model Reconstruction in a Models Based Engineering environment, allowing optimization in the manufacturing and assembly operations and providing information as to the As-Built configuration to engineering and physics designers for evaluation. As-Built Engineers is a product realization methodology founded on the notion that life-cycle engineering should be based on what is actually produced and not on what is nominally designed. It enables customization in mass production environments and questions nominal based methods of engineering. Model Reconstruction provides the capability of subjecting a design to adverse conditions within the computer aided environment and building a stereolithography model and simulated radiograph from the analytical finite element information of the simulated damaged part. Models Based Engineering is an information management tool and a key driver toward the development of adaptive product realization infrastructures. It encompasses the breadth of engineering information, from concept through design to product application.
Date: October 1, 1995
Creator: Dolin, R.M.; Hefele, J.; Tsai, C.S. & Maes, G.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final Report: PSP No.14402-10-02 Improved Manufacturing of MC4531 Mold Bodies Using High-Speed Machining

Description: Document is the final report for PSP project No. 14402-10-02 entitled ''Improved Manufacturing of MC4531 Mold Bodies Using High-Speed Machining (HSM)''. The basic physics of high speed machining is discussed in detail including multiple vibrational mode machining systems (milling and turning) and the effect of spindle speed regulation on maximizing the depth of cut and metal removal rate of a machining operation. The topics of cutting tests and tap tests are also discussed as well as the use of the HSM assistance software ''Harmonizer''. Results of the application of HSM to the machining of encapsulation molds are explained in detail including cutting test results, new tool speeds and feeds, dimensional and surface finish measurements and a comparison to the original machining operations and cycle times. A 38% improvement in cycle time is demonstrated while achieving a 50% better surface finish than required.
Date: October 2002
Creator: Jokiel, Bernhard, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Automatic design of 3-d fixtures and assembly pallets

Description: This paper presents an implemented algorithm that automatically designs fixtures and assembly pallets to hold three-dimensional parts. All fixtures generated by the algorithm employ round side locators, a side clamp, and cylindrical supports; depending on the value of an input control flag, the fixture may also include swing-arm top clamps. Using these modular elements, the algorithm designs fixtures that rigidly constrain and locate the part, obey task constraints, are robust to part shape variations, are easy to load, and are economical to produce. For the class of fixtures that are considered, the algorithm is guaranteed to find the global optimum design that satisfies these and other pragmatic conditions. The authors present the results of the algorithm applied to several practical manufacturing problems. For these complex problems the algorithm typically returns initial high-quality fixture designs in less than a minute, and identifies the global optimum design in just over an hour. The algorithm is also capable of solving difficult design problems where a single fixture is desired that can hold either of two parts.
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Brost, R.C. & Peters, R.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance evaluation of the BostoMatic 300 machining center

Description: The BostoMatic 300 (BM300) machining center is an integral part of an ongoing Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) titled ``Intelligent Tools for On-Machine Acceptance of Precision Machined Components``. On-Machine Acceptance (OMA) is a new agile manufacturing concept being developed for machine tools at SNL. The concept behind OMA is the integration of product design, fabrication, and qualification processes. To achieve the OMA integration of design, fabrication and qualification processes, the BM300 will function as a fabrication and inspection tool. The BM300 performance evaluation took place in July and August of 1994. Tests were conducted in the Advanced Manufacturing Process Laboratory (AMPL), Bldg 878, SNL/NM using a BM300 serial number MM-590. All testing was in accordance with ANSI/ASME B5.54-1992 ``Performance Evaluation of Numerically Controlled Machining Centers``, unless otherwise noted. The results of all tests were compiled and documented in Section 4.0. The ANSI B5.54 testing of the BM300 was divided into six areas. Those areas are linear displacement accuracy, angular displacement accuracy, axis of rotation (spindle), geometric accuracy, volumetric performance, and machine performance as a measuring tool. Details regarding the six tests and test equipment are documented in Section 4.0. As of August 1994 testing of the BM300 in the area of ``Machine Performance as a Measuring Tool`` had not been completed. Future testing in this area may incorporate the LDRD test part along with the appropriate ANSI B5.54 specification in determining the BM300 accuracy.
Date: January 1, 1996
Creator: Bryce, E.A.; Clingan, D.E.; Harwell, L.D. & Christensen, N.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department