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CERAMIC MEMBRANE ENABLING TECHNOLOGY FOR IMPROVED IGCC EFFICIENCY

Description: This quarterly technical progress report will summarize work accomplished for Phase 1 Program during the quarter October to December 2001. In task 1 optimization of the substrate material has yielded substantial improvements to membrane life. In task 2, composite development has enabled 50% of the target flux under Type 1B process conditions. In task 3, manufacturing development has demonstrated that 36 inch long tubes can be produced. The work in task 4 has demonstrated that composite OTM elements can produce oxygen at greater than 95% purity for more than 500 hours of the target flux. In task 5 construction of the multi-tube OTM reactor is completed and initial startup testing was carried out.
Date: February 1, 2002
Creator: Prasad, Ravi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Combustion oscillation control

Description: Premixing of fuel and air can avoid high temperatures which produce thermal NOx, but oscillating combustion must be eliminated. Combustion oscillations can also occur in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle turbines. As an alternative to design or operating modifications, METC is investigating active combustion control (ACC) to eliminate oscillations; ACC uses repeated adjustment of some combustion parameter to control the variation in heat release that drives oscillations.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Richards, G.A. & Janus, M.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Indirect-fired gas turbine bottomed with fuel cell

Description: An indirect-heated gas turbine cycle is bottomed with a fuel cell cycle with the heated air discharged from the gas turbine being directly utilized at the cathode of the fuel cell for the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction occurring within the fuel cell. The hot cathode recycle gases provide a substantial portion of the heat required for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. A separate combustor provides the balance of the heat needed for the indirect heating of the compressed air used in the gas turbine cycle. Hot gases from the fuel cell are used in the combustor to reduce both the fuel requirements of the combustor and the NOx emissions therefrom. Residual heat remaining in the air-heating gases after completing the heating thereof is used in a steam turbine cycle or in an absorption refrigeration cycle. Some of the hot gases from the cathode can be diverted from the air-heating function and used in the absorption refrigeration cycle or in the steam cycle for steam generating purposes.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Micheli, P.L.; Williams, M.C. & Parsons, E.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly progress report, December 1, 1995--February 29, 1996

Description: This report describes the overall program status of the General Electric Advanced Gas Turbine Development program, and reports progress on three main task areas. The program is focused on two specific products: (1) a 70-MW class industrial gas turbine based on the GE90 core technology, utilizing a new air cooling methodology; and (2) a 200-MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced GE heavy-duty machine, utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. The emphasis for the industrial system is placed on cycle design and low emission combustion. For the utility system, the focus is on developing a technology base for advanced turbine cooling while achieving low emission combustion. The three tasks included in this progress report are on: conversion to a coal-fueled advanced turbine system, integrated program plan, and design and test of critical components. 13 figs., 1 tab.
Date: June 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ceramic Membrane Enabling Technology for Improved IGCC Efficiency, Quarterly Technical Progress Report: July 1 - September 30, 2002

Description: This quarterly technical progress report will summarize work accomplished for Phase 1 Program during the quarter July to September 2002. In task 1 characterization of PSO1x has shown no decrease in strength at operating temperature. In task 2, composite development has demonstrated the ability to fabricate membranes of the new material PSO1x. In task 3, increased length elements have been fabricated. The work in task 4 testing of PSO1x has demonstrated oxygen purity of greater than 95% after more than 500 hours of testing. In task 5 the multi-element OTM reactor has been operated and produced oxygen at greater than target purity and flux.
Date: November 1, 2002
Creator: Prasad, Ravi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dynamic analysis of process reactors

Description: The process design for integration of advanced gasifiers for combined-cycle facilities requires a dynamic analysis tool for predicting the gasifier performance and stability. Such a tool provides an understanding of both process reactions and the interaction of process components. To illustrate the utility of the process dynamic tool, a Gasifier Dynamic Model (GDM) was developed at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to investigate alternative designs and operational scenarios during process design development. Empirical data and first principles were combined into steady-state process models to develop sensitivity parameters around a nominal process design condition. These gain factors were then coupled with time-dependent functions for process mass and energy inventories to develop the dynamic model (GDM). Engineering calculations performed in the GDM were used to predict process responses such as gas make, flow, pressure, and temperature. Small research facilities were constructed and operated to validate both the steady-state process and dynamic models. GDM predictions provided engineers insights into the design integrity and operational safety of the reactions, components, and control elements.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Shadle, L.J.; Lawson, L.O. & Noel, S.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Utility Advanced Turbine System (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration -- Phase 3. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1996

Description: The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detailed design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. This report summarizes work accomplished during the period 2Q96.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, August 25--November 30, 1993

Description: GE has achieved a leadership position in the worldwide gas turbine industry in both industrial/utility markets and in aircraft engines. This design and manufacturing base plus our close contact with the users provides the technology for creation of the next generation advanced power generation systems for both the industrial and utility industries. GE has been active in the definition of advanced turbine systems for several years. These systems will leverage the technology from the latest developments in the entire GE gas turbine product line. These products will be USA based in engineering and manufacturing and are marketed through the GE Industrial and Power Systems. Achieving the advanced turbine system goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NOx and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NOx emission. Improved coating and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal.
Date: June 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced turbine systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, September 1 - November 30, 1994

Description: Achieving the advanced turbine system goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NOx, and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system: the turbine inlet temperature must increase, although this will lead to increased NOx emission. Improved coating and materials along with creative combustor design can result in solutions. The program is focused on two specific products: a 70 MW class industrial gas turbine based on GE90 core technology utilizing an innovative air cooling methodology, and a 200 MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced GE heavy duty machines utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. This report reports on tasks 3-8 for the industrial ATS and the utility ATS. Some impingement heat transfer results are given.
Date: December 31, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transport Reactor Facility

Description: The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is currently evaluating hot gas desulfurization (HGD)in its on-site transport reactor facility (TRF). This facility was originally constructed in the early 1980s to explore advanced gasification processes with an entrained reactor, and has recently been modified to incorporate a transport riser reactor. The TRF supports Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power systems, one of METC`s advanced power generation systems. The HGD subsystem is a key developmental item in reducing the cost and increasing the efficiency of the IGCC concept. The TRF is a unique facility with high-temperature, high-pressure, and multiple reactant gas composition capability. The TRF can be configured for reacting a single flow pass of gas and solids using a variety of gases. The gas input system allows six different gas inputs to be mixed and heated before entering the reaction zones. Current configurations allow the use of air, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, methane, nitrogen, oxygen, steam, or any mixture of these gases. Construction plans include the addition of a coal gas input line. This line will bring hot coal gas from the existing Fluidized-Bed Gasifier (FBG) via the Modular Gas Cleanup Rig (MGCR) after filtering out particulates with ceramic candle filters. Solids can be fed either by a rotary pocket feeder or a screw feeder. Particle sizes may range from 70 to 150 micrometers. Both feeders have a hopper that can hold enough solid for fairly lengthy tests at the higher feed rates, thus eliminating the need for lockhopper transfers during operation.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Berry, D.A. & Shoemaker, S.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Utility advanced turbine system (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration -- Phase 3. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1995

Description: The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detailed design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. This initial report summarizes work accomplished during the third quarter of 1995. The most significant accomplishments reported include the following. Overall design continued, progressing from preliminary and conceptual design activities to detailed design activities. The aerodynamic design of six out of eight 9H turbine airfoils was completed. The 9H compressor design concept was finalized including rotor configuration, aerodynamic design of compressor, and compressor structure. Conceptual on-base and external piping layout was begun. The ATS Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement was negotiated and signed.
Date: December 31, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing -- Phase 3. Technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997

Description: The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE`s request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 4Q97.
Date: December 31, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Hot-Gas Desulfurization Sorbents

Description: Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power systems are being advanced worldwide for generating electricity from coal due to their superior environmental performance, economics, and efficiency in comparison to conventional coal-based power plants. Hot gas cleanup offers the potential for higher plant thermal efficiencies and lower cost. A key subsystem of hot-gas cleanup is hot-gas desulfurization using regenerable sorbents. Sorbents based on zinc oxide are currently the leading candidates and are being developed for moving- and fluidized- bed reactor applications. Zinc oxide sorbents can effectively reduce the H{sub 2}S in coal gas to around 10 ppm levels and can be regenerated for multicycle operation. However, all current first-generation leading sorbents undergo significant loss of reactivity with cycling, as much as 50% or greater loss in only 25-50 cycles. Stability of the hot-gas desulfurization sorbent over 100`s of cycles is essential for improved IGCC economics over conventional power plants. This project aims to develop hot-gas cleanup sorbents for relatively lower temperature applications, 343 to 538{degrees}C with emphasis on the temperature range from 400 to 500{degrees}. Recent economic evaluations have indicated that the thermal efficiency of IGCC systems increases rapidly with the temperature of hot-gas cleanup up to 350{degrees}C and then very slowly as the temperature is increased further. This suggests that the temperature severity of the hot-gas cleanup devices can be reduced without significant loss of thermal efficiency. The objective of this study is to develop attrition-resistant advanced hot-gas desulfurization sorbents which show stable and high sulfidation reactivity at 343{degrees}C (650{degrees}F) to 538{degrees}C(1OOO{degrees}F) and regenerability at lower temperatures than leading first generation sorbents.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Jothimurugesan, K.; Gangwal, S.K.; Gupta, R. & Turk, B.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Task 8 -- Design and test of critical components

Description: This report covers tasks 8.1, 8.1.1, and 8.2. The primary objective of Task 8.1, Particulates Flow Deposition, is to characterize the particulate generated in an operating gas turbine combined cycle (GTCC) power plant whose configuration approximates that proposed for an ATS power plant. In addition, the task is to evaluate the use of full-flow filtering to reduce the steam particulate loads. Before the start of this task, GE had already negotiated an agreement with the candidate power plant, piping and a filter unit had already been installed at the power plant site, and major elements of the data acquisition system had been purchased. The objective of Task 8.1.1, Coolant Purity, is to expose typical ATS gas turbine airfoil cooling channel geometries to real steam flow to determine whether there are any unexpected deposit formations. The task is a static analog of the centrifugal deposition rig trials of Task 8.2, in which a bucket channel return bend is exposed to steam flow. Two cooling channel geometries are of primary interest in this static exposure. The primary objective of Task 8.2, Particle Centrifugal Sedimentation, is to determine the settling characteristics of particles in a cooling stream from an operating gas turbine combined cycle (GTCC) power plant when that stream is ducted through a passage experiencing the G-loads expected in a simulated bucket channel specimen representative of designs proposed for an ATS gas turbine.
Date: November 1, 1996
Creator: Chance, T.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High pressure coal-fired ceramic air heater for gas turbine applications. Quarterly report, February 1--April 30, 1994

Description: This is a quarterly report on High Pressure Coal-Fired Ceramic Air Heater for Gas Turbine Applications. The tasks covered in this report are Program Management; Component Development -- including erosion/corrosion problems, coal handling system, natural gas fuel system and tube-string development; Component System Integration and Testing; and Testing and Analysis.
Date: April 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING: PHASE 3R

Description: The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q99.
Date: September 1, 1999
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

General Electric ATS Program technical review Phase 2 activities

Description: The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program Phase 2 objectives are to select a cycle, and to identify and resolve technical issues required to realize the ATS Program goals of 60% net combined cycle efficiency, single digit NOx, and a 10% electric power cost reduction, compared to current technology. The Phase 2 efforts have showns that the ATS Program goals are achievable. The GE Power Generation advanced gas turbine will use closed-loop steam cooling in the first two turbine stages and advanced coatings, seals and cooling designs to meet ATS performance and cost of electricity goals.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Chance, T. & Smith, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Support services for Ceramic Fiber-Ceramic Matrix Composites. Annual technical progress report

Description: Higher working-fluid temperatures are required to boost efficiency, exposing subsystems to more corrosive environments. Issues of special concern to ceramists are corrosion and blinding of hot-gas particulate filters and catastrophic failure of high-temperature ceramic heat exchangers. Fuel and operational factors that affect the corrosion rates of structural ceramics in coal-fired combustor systems are described, with examples of the corrosion of silicon carbide-based materials. Attention is focused on hot-gas particulate filtration and heat exchangers; gasification systems are also discussed. Objective of the report is to help the experimentalist measuring these factors to better design tests.
Date: September 20, 1995
Creator: Hurley, J. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

H gas turbine combined cycle

Description: A major step has been taken in the development of the Next Power Generation System--``H`` Technology Combined Cycle. This new gas turbine combined-cycle system increases thermal performance to the 60% level by increasing gas turbine operating temperature to 1,430 C (2,600 F) at a pressure ratio of 23 to 1. Although this represents a significant increase in operating temperature for the gas turbine, the potential for single digit NOx levels (based upon 15% O{sub 2}, in the exhaust) has been retained. The combined effect of performance increase and environmental control is achieved by an innovative closed loop steam cooling system which tightly integrates the gas turbine and steam turbine cycles. The ``H`` Gas Turbine Combined Cycle System meets the goals and objectives of the DOE Advanced Turbine System Program. The development and demonstration of this new system is being carried out as part of the Industrial/Government cooperative agreement under the ATS Program. This program will achieve first commercial operation of this new system before the end of the century.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Corman, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Moving-bed sorbents

Description: The objective of this program is to develop mixed-metal oxide sorbent formulations that are suitable for moving-bed, high-temperature, desulfurization of coal gas. Work continues on zinc titanates formulations and Z-sorb III sorbent.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Ayala, R.E.; Gupta, R.P. & Chuck, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING PHASE 3 RESTRUCTURED (3R)

Description: Much of the ''H'' technology design is based on proven, established technologies. The major technologies of the combined cycle powertrain, including the bearing designs, the evaluation methods for rotor dynamics, the compressor and turbine blading designs, and the generator field construction methods are all either direct applications of proven design technology or evolutionary refinement of existing designs. It is for these reasons that GE expects that the reliability of the new ''H'' Class generating system will be fully commensurate with the levels associated with today's ''F'' Class combined cycle power plants. With maintenance and operations performed at ''best practice'' levels, the new ''H'' Class plant should reach its full reliability potential of 97.0% or better.
Date: September 1, 2000
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department