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A Comparison of Vocabulary Banks and Scripts on Native English-speaking Students’ Acquisition of Italian

Description: The study applied behavior analytic principles to foreign language instruction in a college classroom. Two study methods, vocabulary banks and scripts, were compared by assessing the effects on Italian language acquisition, retention, and generalization. Results indicate that students without prior exposure to Italian engaged in more exchanges and emitted more words in script tests compared to vocabulary bank tests. Participants with at least two classes in Italian prior to the study engaged in more exchanges and emitted more words during vocabulary bank tests. Data suggest that different teaching strategies may work for different learners. More research is needed to determine efficient teaching methods and how to ascertain which approaches work best for learners with different histories.
Date: May 2012
Creator: Dean, Brittany L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Comparison of Small Study Groups and Traditional Classes on Acquaintance Volume, Reported Problems, and Academic Achievement

Description: The problem of this study was to determine the effect of a small-study-group method of teaching on the achievement, acquaintance volume, reported problems, and willingness to discuss problems of college students enrolled in Introduction to Psychology classes.
Date: August 1971
Creator: Reed, John Calvin
Partner: UNT Libraries

Some Comparisons between Conventional College Teaching Methods and a Composite of Procedures Involving Large Lecture Groups, Seminars, and Reduced Class Time

Description: The problem of this study was to determine the differences in achievement, critical thinking, and attitude toward subjects of junior college freshmen which could be attributed to two approaches to the teaching of English composition and American history. The purpose of the study was to yield information for use as the basis for administrative and instructional judgments concerning pupil deployment, and plant and staff utilization.
Date: May 1969
Creator: Bean, Alvin T. (Alvin Truett)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Status of Recent Experimental, Empirical, and Rhetorical Studies in the Teaching of Persuasion

Description: It was the problem of this study to determine the status of recent experimental, empirical, and rhetorical studies in the teaching of persuasion. An instrument was devised which included studies related to ten major categories traditionally covered in the persuasion course.
Date: December 1971
Creator: Prentice, June Eleanor
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Case Study of Undergraduate Course Syllabi in Taiwan

Description: Higher education in Taiwan has been influenced by U.S. and Western practices, and syllabi represent one means to verify this. However, limited research exists in Taiwan on course syllabi and on similarities of syllabi with practices in other countries. In the U.S. as the paradigm shifted from teaching to learning and to the learning-centered context, scholars argued that syllabi should be learning-centered. Given the assumption that higher education in Taiwan is similar to U.S. higher education and the call for a learning-centered context, this qualitative research examined 180 undergraduate syllabi at a public university in Taiwan with a (traditional) syllabus component template and a learning-centered syllabus component template derived from the literature in the U.S. to describe (1) the contents of syllabi, and (2) the extent that syllabi in Taiwan were congruent to U. S. syllabus component templates. Syllabi at this university were highly congruent with the (traditional) syllabus component template and were congruent at the medium level with the learning-centered component template. About 90% of syllabi included 8 of 10 major components. Additional findings included: 70% of faculty were male, and 30% were female; more than 75% of the faculty earned their doctoral degrees from the United States or Europe; gender made no difference on inclusion of major components for both templates; there was no difference in inclusion of components on both templates for faculty who earned their doctoral degrees from the U.S. or Taiwan; a high percentage (80%) of college courses adopted English textbooks published in the U.S.; some differences existed and use of English in the syllabus and on components included in the syllabi. Based on these syllabi, it is evident that syllabi in Taiwan represent course planning and organization congruent to recommended practices in the United States.
Date: May 2010
Creator: Tung, Yao-Tsu
Partner: UNT Libraries

Graduate Student Opinion of Most Important Attributes in Effective Teaching

Description: Graduate students in the College of Education at the University of North Texas, Denton rated 57 teacher attributes on their relative importance in effective teaching. The data was analyzed across six demographic variables of department, sex, degree, nationality, teaching experience, and previous graduate school, using mean scores, one-way ANOVA, and t-tests for two independent samples.
Date: May 1994
Creator: Onyegam, Emmanuel I. (Emmanuel Ikechi)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Influence of the Instructor's Written Comments upon Student Test Performance in the College Classroom

Description: The problem with which this investigation is concerned is that of determining the influence of instructors' written comments on the test performances of students in selected college subjects. The students were from one university and one junior college. The written comments were designed to be positive in nature and to encourage better future test performances by students. The comments were made in regard to the letter grades received by the students and were placed only on major (as defined by each instructor) objective tests.
Date: December 1970
Creator: Mapel, Seldon Barclay
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Comparison of Employability of Ph.D.'s and Ed.D.'s in College Teaching Versus Ph.D.'s in an Academic Area

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine the opportunities available for employment to Ph.D.'s and Ed.D.'s in College Teaching by revealing the attitudes/preferences of employing agents-—deans and departmental chairmen-—toward Ph.D.'s and Ed.D.'s in College Teaching versus Ph.D.'s in an academic area. The problem led to the development of eleven specific questions which were investigated in the study.
Date: May 1972
Creator: Gonzalez, Diana
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effectiveness of Programmed Vocabulary Instruction in an Undergraduate Collegiate Business Communications Course

Description: This study evaluates the effectiveness of programed vocabulary instruction in an undergraduate collegiate business communications course. In making its evaluation, the study tests the hypothesis that a class using such instruction would improve over a class without formal vocabulary study. The three areas of proficiency measured are written communication, vocabulary, and reading comprehension.
Date: August 1972
Creator: Burnett, Mary Joyce
Partner: UNT Libraries

Method for Improving the Perception of Reality and Understanding of the Population Problem in the College Classroom: A Simulation Game

Description: The purpose of this study is the development of an educational simulation game for use in college classes. The simulation game is based on selected aspects of the population problem. The panel approved or rejected objectives on the basis of their significance as goals for college students. Twelve objectives were approved by a majority of the panel. Upon completion of the exercise, students should be able to compute population increases, to predict population sizes, and to identify birth and death rates that cause a population to increase, decrease, or remain stable. Students should also be able to describe how the following factors affect population size: cultural and religious beliefs, pressure for economic growth, investments of capital, and financial losses. Students should understand the problems of governing a country with a rapidly growing population as compared to problems in governing a country with slower population growth, and they should recognize how rapid population growth can affect the quality of life. Students should recognize decreased birth rates, increased death rates, and increased economic production as possible solutions to the population problem. Finally, students should personalize the population problem and make commitments in seeking and participating in its solutions.
Date: August 1972
Creator: Connor, Thomas Dwight
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effect of Faculty Development on Active Learning in the College Classroom

Description: This study examined the effect of active learning seminars and a mentoring program on the use of active learning teaching techniques by college faculty. A quasi-experimental study was conducted using convenience samples of faculty from two private Christian supported institutions. Data for the study were collected from surveys and faculty course evaluations. The study lasted one semester. Faculty volunteers from one institution served as the experimental group and faculty volunteers from the second institution were the comparison group. The experimental group attended approximately eight hours of active learning seminars and also participated in a one-semester mentoring program designed to assist faculty in application of active learning techniques. Several individuals conducted the active learning seminars. Dr. Charles Bonwell, a noted authority on active learning, conducted the first three-hour seminar. Seven faculty who had successfully used active learning in their classrooms were selected to conduct the remaining seminars. The faculty-mentoring program was supervised by the researcher and conducted by department chairs. Data were collected from three surveys and faculty course evaluations. The three surveys were the Faculty Active Learning Survey created by the researcher, the Teaching Goals Inventory created by Angelo and Cross, and the college edition of Learner-Centered Practices by Barbara McCombs. The use of active learning techniques by the experimental group increased significantly more than the use by those in the convenience sample. No statistical difference was found in the change of professors' teaching beliefs or the course evaluation results.
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Date: May 2001
Creator: Evans, Cindy
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Experimental Investigation on the Effects of Learning Style and Presentation Methods on Knowledge Acquisition in a University Classroom Environment

Description: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of four learning styles (accommodator, assimilator, converger, and diverger) and two different presentation methods (traditional and computer-based) on knowledge acquisition in a university classroom.
Date: December 1997
Creator: Ryu, Youngtae
Partner: UNT Libraries

Burnout among Nursing Faculty in Texas

Description: The study analyzed burnout of nursing faculty to determine the frequency, intensity, and predictors of burnout. Christian Maslach's burnout questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), and a demographic data survey were used to measure burnout. A random selection of 250 nursing faculty was mailed both a burnout questionnaire and a demographic data survey. There were 192 useable responses that were used in the study. Each questionnaire and demographic data survey were reviewed for completeness and rechecked for accurate data entry. The results were presented in summary tables. Data analysis included frequency, means, Pearson r, and downward, stepwise regression analyses. There was a high frequency and intensity of burnout in all nursing faculty, as measured in the three MBI subscales (depersonalization, emotional exhaustion, and personal accomplishment). There was a significant relationship between the number of hours nursing faculty spend with academic advising and the intensity of emotional exhaustion. None of the demographic data, except hours spent in academic advising, were a predictor of burnout.
Date: August 1992
Creator: Thomas, Nanci Terese
Partner: UNT Libraries

"Respect is active like an organism that is not only cumulative but has a very personal effect": A grounded theory methodology of a respect communication model in the college classroom.

Description: This study examined the notion of respect in the college classroom. While pedagogical researchers had previously studied the phenomenon, each found challenges in defining it. Moreover, communication scholars do not examine respect as a primary pedagogical factor with learning implications. Focus groups provided venues for topic-specific discussion necessary for better understanding the diversity of students' worldviews regarding respect in the college classroom. Grounded theory allowed for searching theoretical relevance of the phenomenon through constant comparison with categorical identification. The most practical contributions of this research identifies as several major notions including, the importance of relationships within the process, student self-esteem, and global-classroom respect. In addition, implications emerged from the data as learning, motivation, and environment. One other practical contribution exists as a respect communication model for the college classroom. Further, examining students' worldviews of respect in the classroom provides benefits for pedagogical scholars, students, and instructors.
Date: August 2004
Creator: Martinez, Alma
Partner: UNT Libraries

Ethics of Teaching: Beliefs and Behaviors of Community College Faculty

Description: This study examines the ethical beliefs and behaviors of full-time community college faculty. Respondents report to what degree they practice sixty-two behaviors as teachers and whether they believe the behaviors to be ethical. Survey participants engaged in few of the behaviors, and only reported two actions as ethical: (1) accepting inexpensive gifts from students and (2) teaching values or ethics. The participants reported diverse responses to questions about behavior of a sexual nature, but most agreed that sexual relationships with students or colleagues at the same, higher or lower rank were unethical. Additional findings relate to the presence of diversity among the faculty, using school resources to publish textbooks and external publications, selling goods to students, and an expansive list of other behaviors. Findings of this study are compared to results from earlier studies that utilized the same or similar survey instrument with teaching faculty. The study has implications for organizational policy and procedure, for faculty training and development, the teaching of ethics or values in the classroom and for future research.
Date: August 2002
Creator: Scales, Renay Ford
Partner: UNT Libraries

Utilizing staff training methods for developing a mathetics error correction procedure in a university classroom.

Description: The education community agrees that correcting student errors is important for learning. They do not agree on the components that define successful error correcting. Some theories suggest that detailed feedback facilitates adult learning and some suggest that less detail is needed for these learners. Gilbert (1962) applied the scientifically derived methods of Behavior Analysis when designing instruction. This study attempted to develop an efficient error correction procedure for university teachers. Throughout the semester, error correction design efforts between the teachers and the experimenter became more collaborative. While error correction procedures never showed systematic effects on student grades, later versions were viewed more favorably by both teachers and students and were more likely to be implemented accurately. Decreased teacher practice opportunities, due to low student participation, may have decreased the procedure's effectiveness.
Date: December 2008
Creator: Staff, Donald Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries

Exploring the Relationships Between Faculty Beliefs and Technology Preferences

Description: All too often faculty are asked to implement technology into their teaching without the knowledge necessary to use the technology effectively. Due to the evolution of technology in everyday settings, students have come to expect to be engaged through technological means. This often creates undue stress on faculty members. The purpose of this study is to investigate technology integration by exploring the relationships between a faculty member’s technology preferences and educational beliefs. Through a mixed method, this study attempts to address the question of why faculty use the types of technology they do. More importantly, this study investigates if a faculty member’s educational beliefs have any influence on the technology they choose to use. Thirty-two medical, clinical, and healthcare faculty members participated in the study. They responded to a Teaching Perspectives Inventory (TPI) survey and a Technology Preferences survey with open-ended questions. Data analysis revealed multiple statistically significant findings between different beliefs and different types of technology. The results indicated that personal epistemic beliefs influence the types of technology faculty use. The technology choices faculty make are largely related to tools they are comfortable with and ones they believe effectively fit their teaching materials. The study also found statistically significant differences between age, gender, and reported technology use. It is suggested faculty development programs should consider faculty members’ educational beliefs and personal preferences when supporting faculty with their uses of technologies.
Date: May 2015
Creator: Faulkner, Christopher G.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Examination of Web-based teaching strategies at the University of North Texas.

Description: This study examined the degree to which University of North Texas (UNT) instructors involved in Web-based instruction are implementing teaching strategies as identified in Chickering and Gamson's (1987) model, seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. In addition, the study examined training received by instructors in developing and delivering a Web-based course and the relationships between their training and reported use of the teaching strategies in the seven principles. The study also examined the relationship between the number of Web-based courses taught and the use of the teaching strategies. Seventy-two surveys were distributed, with a return rate of 90.3%. Results of the first three research questions were as follows: (a) Self-taught (49%) and UNT Center for Distributed Learning (CDL) (31%) were the most frequently used types of training in preparation for teaching a Web-based course, whereas peer taught (17%) and conferences/workshops (3%) were the least used; (b) the average number of Web-based courses taught by the instructors was M = 8.26; and (c) the most frequently used principles were "Gives prompt feedback" and "Communicates high expectations." UNT CDL assists faculty with the development and delivery of online courses, offering a series of training courses to better prepare faculty to use Web-CT. The relationship between the training received and the instructors' reported use of the teaching strategies was examined using correlations and a MANOVA analysis. The correlations resulted in both positive and negative relationships between the four types of training and three of the principles. The MANOVA procedure found significant differences between self taught instructors and instructors that received most of their training through the CDL in relation to the principle "Respects diverse talents and ways of learning." The final research question examined the relationship between the number of courses taught and instructors' reported use of the teaching strategies, revealing ...
Date: August 2005
Creator: Ray, Julie B.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Comparison of Profiles of Success in Two Instructional Methods

Description: The problem of this study was to isolate predictors of academic success in both self-paced classes and lecture classes in Introductory Accounting. The purposes of the study were to determine if learning style, locus of control, reading ability, age, sex, accounting work experience, and prior accounting academic experience are predictors of success in Introductory Accounting classes taught using self-paced methods of instruction and lecture methods of instruction. Another purpose was to determine if there is a difference in the set of predictors of success in the two instructional methods and to provide some direction as to determinants of success which may be addressed by counselors in advising students. The data were collected from 463 students at a suburban community college in the Southwest. Each of the variables was analyzed by a stepwise multiple regression analysis and a backward elimination regression for students grouped according to instructional method. A two-way multivariate analysis of variance was used to examine whether the distribution of scores on the potential predictor variables were equivalent for students in the two teaching methods and for successful completers of the course and noncompleters. Consideration of the data findings of this study permitted the following conclusions: 1. Age and reading ability have a positive relationship to academic success in an Introductory Accounting course taught in a lecture format. 2. Concrete learning style, as measured by the Learning Style Inventory, age, reading ability, and accounting work experience have a positive relationship to success in an Introductory Accounting course taught in a self-paced format. 3. Age, reading ability, accounting work experience, and a concrete learning style have a positive relationship to academic success in Accounting courses taught using either method. 4. There is a difference in the set of predictors of success for Accounting classes taught using the two instructional methods. ...
Date: August 1987
Creator: Williams, John David, 1948-
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Comparative Study of Opinions Concerning Faculty Teaching Behaviors Among Faculty Members and Senior Teacher Training Students in Six Teachers Colleges in Bangkok Thailand

Description: The purpose of this study is to compare the opinions concerning faculty teaching behaviors among groups of faculty members and senior teacher training students in six teachers colleges in Bangkok, Thailand. Five research hypotheses guided the data analysis for this study; the variables used were sex, age, teaching experience, and college of employment. A published, validated survey instrument, which lists sixty-one behavioral items and incorporates a Likert-type response scale, was used to collect the data. Random sampling of the population corresponded to existing male-female ratios for each group at each schools, with the exception of one school that has only female students. From the sample of 480, the total response was 85.6 percent. In order to test for significant differences of opinion among the variables and between the groups at the .05 level, t and F tests were applied. The data indicate that 70.5 percent of the 190 responding faculty are females who have taught for more than ten years; females also constitute 72.4 percent of the 221 senior teacher training students. In regard to opinions of appropriate faculty teaching behaviors, significant differences were found between faculty and students (faculty members had higher mean scores) and between male and female faculty members (female faculty had higher mean scores). Conclusions drawn from these and other findings for this sample population include that (1) faculty and students do not agree upon what constitutes appropriate faculty teaching behaviors; (2) faculty members have stronger opinions than students about the appropriateness of such behaviors; and (3) there is more agreement among students than among faculty regarding the items that constitute appropriate faculty teaching behavior. The data findings are also discussed in the context of cultural differences that could have affected findings which were different from those discussed in the literature on evaluation of faculty teaching ...
Date: December 1984
Creator: Bhulapatna, Prakit
Partner: UNT Libraries

Attitudes toward Research and Teaching: Differences Between Faculty and Administrators at Three Saudi Arabian Universities

Description: This study is an investigation of the perceived attitudinal differences between administrators and faculty toward research and teaching at three Saudi Arabian universities, King Saud University (KSU), King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM), and the Islamic University (IU). The researcher also investigated the effect of several variables, such as rank, university, and academic field on administrators and faculty members' attitudes toward teaching and research. Little Attention has been given to studies that examine the differences between faculty and administrators with regard to their attitudes toward the priorities of teaching and research in Saudi Arabian institutions. Also, little research has been conducted regarding the effects of rank and academic field on faculty attitudes in Saudi Arabian institutions. The author used a mail survey and collected 518 useable responses from a total of 710 questionnaires distributed. Factor analysis, MANCOVA, MANOVA, and ANOVA were the statistical methods employed in data analysis. Five attitudes were identified as a result of factor analysis: (a) attitudes toward teaching; (b) attitudes toward research; (c) mission; (d) promotion; and (e) interest. Results indicated that there was a significant difference between faculty and administrators regarding teaching and resea4rch. Administrators showed stronger attitudes toward teaching than faculty at all three universities. There were also significant differences regarding these attitudes in terms of rank, academic field, and university. Full professors had the strongest attitude toward a research emphasis compared to assistant professors. Assistant professors had the strongest teaching orientation. In addition, faculty members in the humanities had stronger teaching orientations preferences than did those in the natural and social sciences. Regarding the universities, faculty members at IU had the strongest teaching orientation preferences, whereas faculty members at KSU had the strongest research orientation preferences.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: May 2000
Creator: Alsouhibani, Mohammed A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Comparative Study of Odessa College, Odessa, Texas, with Business Colleges in the Odessa Area to Determine the Effectiveness of Training Received by Business Students

Description: The potential college students of the Odessa area need to know which type of school best suits their personal needs. The area around Odessa offers the highest paid secretarial Jobs in the state, with some 500 oil and oil supply firms employing from one to fifty full-time secretaries, with salaries ranging from $200 to 4325 per month. The opportunities for accountants, bookkeepers and auditors in the Odessa area is unlimited, and they earn from 4350 to $450 per month. The Odessa area also employs approximately 30 business teachers. 1 The. high school graduate is often at a loss as to whether to take advantage of a business course in a private business college in Odessa or whether to study business administration for one or two years at the local junior college, either in preparation for a job or for additional education at another college or university. A great deal of time and money may be wasted if a potential student attends the school that does not fulfill his needs. In view of the above, the purpose of this study is to make comparisons between the two types of schools in an effort to determine the type of school most suited for each student, and to pave the way for improvements in business education in that area. These facts will be helpful in planning the future curriculum and expansion of Odessa College and the possible establishment of a business school in connection with Odessa College.
Date: August 1951
Creator: Woods, John C.
Partner: UNT Libraries