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Supreme Court Drives Home Its Concern for Privacy in Collins v. Virginia

Description: This report discusses the Collins decision and its potential implications for Fourth Amendment law. Facing a clash between two well-established Fourth Amendment doctrines--the primacy of the home in Fourth Amendment case law versus the "automobile exception" to the Amendment's warrant requirement--the Supreme Court in Collins v. Virginia ultimately came down on the side of protecting privacy within the home and its adjoining property.
Date: June 26, 2018
Creator: Hanna, Jillian C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Military Enjoined from Transferring American ISIS Suspect to Foreign Country--at Least for Now

Description: This report discusses the case of Doe v. Mattis, a case with potential ramifications regarding the authority to conduct military operations against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS). The U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit (D.C. Circuit) upheld 2-1 the district court's injunctions temporarily protecting "John Doe" from forcible transfer to another country from Iraq, where he is currently being held by the U.S. military as a suspected ISIS combatant.
Date: June 20, 2018
Creator: Elsea, Jennifer K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Can Aliens in Immigration Proceedings Be Detained Indefinitely?: High Court Rules on Statutory, but not Constitutional Authority

Description: This report discusses the Supreme Court's ruling in the case of "Jennings vs. Rodriguez" which dealt with whether immigrant aliens could be detained indefinitely. The court ruled that the aliens could be held indefinitely without a bond hearing under statutory law but left the constitutionality of the action open for future interpretation.
Date: April 3, 2018
Creator: Smith, Hillel R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

When Does Double Prosecution Count as Double Jeopardy?

Description: This report discusses the Fifth Amendment's Double Jeopardy Clause; although the Clause provides that no person shall "be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb," the Supreme Court has made clear that that protection has its limits.
Date: August 16, 2018
Creator: Hsin, JD S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department