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Runaway and Homeless Youth: Demographics and Programs

Description: This report discusses runaway and homeless youth, and the federal response to support this population. It provides an overview defining the population, a history of the evolution of relevant federal policy, a description of the Runaway and Homeless Youth Program and its funding, and a summary of additional federal support.
Date: June 13, 2016
Creator: Fernandes-Alcantara, Adrienne L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Runaway and Homeless Youth Act: Current Issues for Reauthorization

Description: This report discusses the Runaway and Homeless Youth program, which is authorized by the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act, and funds organizations throughout the country to provide services to youth who have run away and/or experience homelessness.
Date: October 23, 2014
Creator: Fernandes-Alcantara, Adrienne L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Social Skills Training with High-Functioning Autistic Adolescents

Description: Social skills training is a need among autistic adolescents. This investigation examined a social skills training program involving several teaching strategies. Specific social skills were targeted for improvement. Attempts to decrease negative social behaviors were made. Five autistic adolescents participated in the program and five were selected for the no-treatment group. Two measures were used. A survey addressing the skills targeted in the program was completed by parents and teachers before and after the program. A test conversation with a stranger and a peer was conducted with each subject before and after the program. Anecdotal information was obtained from therapists, teachers, and parents. Results provided information on the effectiveness of this social skills program. The benefits and limitations of the program were discussed.
Date: August 1988
Creator: Eversole, Amy
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Compliance-gaining among Anglo and Mexican-American children

Description: This study investigates compliance-gaining rhetoric among Anglo and Mexican-American fourth graders in three schools in north Texas. The children were asked to respond to a scenario and to give a rationale for their persuasive strategies. An analysis of interviews with 52 children indicates that although the children used some similar strategies when attempting to gain compliance from an adult, there are also some significant differences between the two cultural groups.
Date: August 1993
Creator: Stroupe, Hal T. (Hal Tanner)
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

The Effects of School Performance on the Self-Concept and Locus of Control of Learning Disabled and Emotionally Disturbed Elementary Students

Description: A number of authors have suggested recently that the behavioral characteristics and self-perceptions of learning disabled and emotionally disturbed children are so similar as to negate the fruitfulness of trying to differentiate between these two groups. These characteristics are quite similar for the two special education groups when they have been compared independently of each other to regular education students. In order to provide support for these prior studies, the self-concepts and locus of control of 36 learning disabled, emotionally disturbed, and regular education students were compared. A significant difference was found between the LD and RE students in terms of self-concept only. No significant differences were noted between the ED and RE students. These results are discussed in relation to the somewhat conflicting results of prior studies with implications for future research.
Date: May 1984
Creator: Ronalder, Ronnie Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Aggression and Social Interest in Behavior Disordered Students

Description: This study investigated whether behavior disordered children would decrease aggressive behavior if their social interest were developed. Three hypotheses that were tested predicted that there would be a significant difference between the control group and the experimental group on adjusted mean scores on aggressive behavior on post test scores. The measuring instruments used were the Child Behavior Checklist Parent Report Form, the Child Behavior Checklist Teacher Report Form, and the Child Behavior Checklist Director Observation Form. It was also predicted that there would be a significant difference between the control group and the experimental group on post test adjusted mean scores as measured on the Social Interest Scale. An analysis of covariance was employed to test the data. Behavior disordered students in the experimental group participated in three activities designed to develop their social interest. They participated in peer tutoring, socialization with nursing home residents, and group discussions. Data were collected from parents, teachers, and observers of behavior disordered students in an elementary school in Northwest Louisiana during the summer term of 1987. Teachers did report a statistically significant difference between the experimental and the control groups in the decrease of aggressive behavior. These results are in accord with predictions generated by Adlerian theory and with naturalistic data. Parents and observers did not report a statistically significant difference between the two groups in the decrease of aggressive behavior. Significant differences were not found between the experimental and control groups in the development of social interest. Since the teachers did report statistically significant results in this study, it is recommended that these same activities to develop social interest be repeated, that counseling sessions be designed to be more therapeutic, and that additional modeling and role playing be included. It is further recommended that an instrument be developed to measure social interest …
Date: May 1988
Creator: Brown, Deborah D. (Deborah Dairy)
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

A Comparison of Bus and Town Pupils in Educational Progress

Description: The problem of this thesis is to determine the progress made by a group of bus and town pupils in the second grade and should indicate whether or not riding the school bus is detrimental to the academic achievement, behavior development, and personality development of the individual.
Date: 1951
Creator: Weatherred, Bernice Allene
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

A Deconstruction and Qualitative Analysis of the Consumption of Traditional Entertainment Media by Elementary-Aged Children Diagnosed with Emotional Disorders.

Description: This qualitative study examined whether a connection exists between children with emotional disorders consumption of traditional entertainment media and their subsequent vegative/anti-social classroom behavior. Research participants included six first-grade children diagnosed with an emotional disorder and their teacher. They were interviewed using a semi-structured approach. The students were observed in the natural setting of their classroom for a total of twenty-four hours, over a four-day period. Transcripts and classroom observations were analyzed, looking for connections between behavior and consumption of traditional entertainment media. Findings from this study concluded that these students used traditional entertainment media as a method of temporally escaping from the environment of their respective households.
Date: August 2004
Creator: Lowdermilk, John Lloyd
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

An Exploratory Study of Curiosity in Three-, Four- and Five-Year-Old Children

Description: This study investigated the development of curiosity in young children. A previous study by Kreitler, Zigler, and Kreitler had identified five specific types of curiosity, manipulatory curiosity, perceptual curiosity, conceptual curiosity, curiosity about the complex, and adjustive-reactive curiosity. The basic problem was to describe the development of these five types of curiosity in three-, four-, and five-year-old children. A secondary problem was to determine if children follow a predictable pattern in their development of the five types of curiosity. Five tasks, measuring nineteen variables of curiosity, were administered individually to thirty three-year-olds, thirty four-year-olds, and thirty five-year-olds by a trained rater. Mean scores for each variable and each type of curiosity were calculated for each group.
Date: May 1985
Creator: Foote, Martha M. (Martha McNew)
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Food for Young Children

Description: This report discusses how to plan and prepare nutritious meals for young children between three and six years old. Includes recipes.
Date: 1916
Creator: Hunt, Caroline Louisa, 1865-1927
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Determining the Validity of the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children (K-ABC) with Learning Disabilities

Description: This study investigated the relation of the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children (K-ABC) with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - Revised (WISC-R) for learning disabled (LD) children, the relation of K-ABC Achievement subtests with other achievement tests, and the relation of verbal and perceptual abilities assessment and the K-ABC. One hundred white, middle to above socioeconomic status (SES), LD students 6 to 12 1/2 years old were administered the K-ABC in addition to the test battery used to identify them. Findings indicated significant differences (2<-01) between WISC-R Full Scale scores and KABC MPC scores, with MPC scores being 3.33 points lower. Significant correlations (2<-01) were found between the following: (a) WISC-R Performance scores and K-ABC Simultaneous scores, (b) K-ABC Sequential and Simultaneous scores, (c) WISC-R Performance and K-ABC Sequential scores, (d) K-ABC Arithmetic and WRAT Arithmetic, and (e) K-ABC Reading Understanding and the following: Woodcock Word Identification, Woodcock Passage Comprehension, WRAT Reading, and Durrell Silent Reading. The study found the MPC correlates higher with tests of perceptual ability than with tests of verbal ability. Results indicate the following: (a) the WISC-R and K-ABC can substitute each other when measuring overall intelligence, (b) the WISC-R and K-ABC do not measure the same abilities, (c) the Sequential-Simultaneous score discrepancy is a poor diagnostic indicator of LD, (d) the discrepancy between the Achievement scale and the K-ABC intelligence scales is a poor diagnostic indicator of LD, (e) the K-ABC Arithmetic subtest is no better and no worse than the WRAT Arithmetic subtest, (f) WRAT Reading, Woodcock Word Identification and K-ABC Reading Recognition are not interchangeable measures of word calling skills, (g) the K-ABC Reading Understanding subtest is as adequate a measure of reading comprehension as other available tests, (h) the MPC is clearly more a measure of perceptual ability than of verbal …
Date: August 1986
Creator: Antonetti, Robert C.
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

The Effects of Programmed Reinforcement and Chained Mastery Criteria on Yoga Pose Performance in Two Young Children with Autism

Description: Community exercise can offer many benefits for children, including the opportunity to engage in physical activity and interact with peers in a social setting. Children with autism do not engage in as many community activities as their typical peers. This study examines conditions to teach young children to complete yoga poses to mastery. The effects of prompting, programmed reinforcers, and a chaining criteria were evaluated using a comparison design with two baselines and one intervention condition, replicated across two children with autism. Both children mastered performance of all four targeted yoga poses. The findings are discussed in the context of previous research on the benefits of yoga.
Date: December 2015
Creator: Nguyen, Linda N.
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Billikin Whiskers and the Mountain Trolls: A Children's Play

Description: This thesis is a play for children. The story and the characters were derived from traditional Norwegian fairy tales. The central character is Billikin Whiskers, a billy-goat, who is captured by three trolls--Sparky, Garr and Pragg. The play is set on a mountain in Norway. The central idea of the play is the issue of intelligence--represented by Billikin Whiskers--versus physical strength--symbolized by the trolls.
Date: August 1993
Creator: Glover, Ann L. (Ann Louise)
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Visual perception in relation to levels of meaning for children: An exploratory study.

Description: This study explores distinct levels of meaning from images of picture books perceived by 3- to 5-year-old children and investigates how the certain visual perception factors influence children's meaning making and if these factors are correlated. The literature review supports associations among visual perception, information, picture books, meaning, and children. Visual perception serves as the first channel that filters and interprets visual information, and picture books provide visual and verbal experience for children, who constantly search for meaning. Children age 3 to 5 years are potential users of picture books because pictorial information is considered useful to children's learning tasks. Previous research reveals that various factors influence visual perception, and meaning has been mostly associated with its semantic significance in information retrieval. In information science, little research has focused on young children's own way of categorizing information, especially visual information. In order to investigate the distinct levels of meaning perceived by children, the investigation employed both qualitative and quantitative methods including unobtrusive and participant observation, factor analysis, content analysis, and case study. The result of this study contributes to understanding the cognitive process of children related to visual literacy and their interpreting visual information in a digital environment.
Date: August 2007
Creator: Yu, Xinyu
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

The Effect of Ritalin on WISC-R Block Design WISC-R Coding and Bender Gestalt Developmental Scores of Hyperactive Children

Description: Psychological research suggests that Ritalin reduces the rate of maladaptive behaviors in hyperactive children but does not improve their academic performance. Teachers, however, often assert that writing skills and other graphic work are improved by Ritalin. Twenty elementary school children who had been diagnosed as hyperactive and who were taking Ritalin were tested using WISC-R coding, WISC-R block design, and Bender Gestalt. Ten of the subjects were assigned to a group which was first tested when the children were off Ritalin and subsequently tested when they were on Ritalin. The sequence was reversed for the remaining ten. This procedure was designed to counterbalance the effect of practice. Direct difference t-tests indicated that there were no differences between groups regarding any of the three dependent measures. Thus, results indicate that the popular conceptions among educators regarding the efficacy of Ritalin for improving visual-motor efficiency is open to serious question.
Date: May 1986
Creator: Wall, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Effects of Frustration Tolerance Training on Young Institutionalized Retarded Children

Description: The major problem investigated was to ascertain the extent to which a training program designed specifically to increase frustration tolerance would reduce selected behavioral problems in institutionalized mentally retarded children. Of lesser importance was the problem of examining the extent to which the prescribed training program had differential effects on brain-injured and non-brain-injured retarded children.
Date: January 1968
Creator: Landrum, Jerry Lynn
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Relationship between Selected Behaviors and Developmental Skills in Children with Autism

Description: The purpose of this exploratory study was to gain more information about the developmental skills and abnormal behaviors of children with autism. Major interests included exploring the pattern of developmental strengths and weaknesses, the relationship between unusual behaviors, and the relationship of autistic behaviors to development and IQ.
Date: August 1991
Creator: Felini-Smith, Linda
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

A Parent Questionnaire Examining Learning Disabled and Non-Learning Disabled Children's Spatial Skills

Description: Investigations of children's spatial ability have typically looked at performance on laboratory tasks, and none have examined differences between learning disabled and non-learning disabled children. The present study surveyed sixty-seven parents of third and sixth grade children about the types of spatial activities children engage in everyday. Parents of learning disabled and non-learning disabled children were included. Results provided information about the types of spatial activities children engage in and the relationships between participation and performance. Major findings included differences between learning disabled and non-learning disabled children in navigational ability and in the strategies employed in difficult or ambiguous spatial situations. Findings were discussed in terms of the influence learning disabled children's negative self evaluations have on their performance.
Date: May 1987
Creator: Felini-Smith, Linda
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

An Investigation of Attitudes and Reactions of Preschool and School-Age Children Toward a Child Speaker with Stuttering Patterns

Description: This study compared the attitudes and reactions of thirty preschool and thirty school-age children toward a child speaker with stuttering patterns. An introduction reviewed previous literature on defining stuttering, adults' and children's attitudes toward stuttering, and the stutterer's personality traits. The children of the study rated either a normal child speaker or a child speaker with stuttering patterns on a sociometric scale. In a giving task, the children were asked to choose one of the speakers. Statistical testing revealed that the school-age children had a more negative attitude toward and less social acceptance of the child speaker with stuttering patterns than the normal-speaking child. Implications for the speech-language pathologist in treating the child stutterer are discussed.
Date: August 1985
Creator: Wells, Clare Denise
Partner: UNT Libraries
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