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S. 1961 and H.R. 4024: Legislative Responses to a Chemical Storage Facility Spill

Description: From Summary: "This report describes and analyzes H.R. 4024 and S. 1961, as reported. The bill share a number of broadly similar provisions-both would direct states or the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to establish programs to prevent and respond to releases from chemical storage facilities (H.R. 4024) or tanks (S. 1961) located near drinking water sources-but they take different approaches to doing so; S. 1961 would make programmatic changes by amending the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), while H.R. 4024 would amend the Clean Water Act (CWA)."
Date: August 12, 2014
Creator: Copeland, Claudia & Tiemann, Mary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA): A Summary

Description: This report summarizes the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and the major regulatory programs that mandate reporting by industrial facilities of releases of hazardous chemicals to the environment, as well as local planning to respond in the event of significant, accidental releases.
Date: February 2, 2010
Creator: Schierow, Linda-Jo
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA): A Summary

Description: This report summarizes the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and the major regulatory programs that mandate reporting by industrial facilities of releases of hazardous chemicals to the environment, as well as local planning to respond in the event of significant, accidental releases.
Date: March 4, 2009
Creator: Schierow, Linda-Jo
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA): A Summary

Description: This report summarizes the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and the major regulatory programs that mandate reporting by industrial facilities of releases of hazardous chemicals to the environment, as well as local planning to respond in the event of significant, accidental releases.
Date: October 28, 2010
Creator: Schierow, Linda-Jo
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA): A Summary

Description: This report summarizes the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) and the major regulatory programs that mandate reporting by industrial facilities of releases of potentially hazardous chemicals to the environment, as well as local planning to respond in the event of significant, accidental releases.
Date: April 5, 2012
Creator: Schierow, Linda-Jo
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterizing Indoor Airflow and Pollutant Transport using Simulation Modeling for Prototypical Buildings. I. Office Buildings

Description: This paper describes the first efforts at developing a set of prototypical buildings defined to capture the key features affecting airflow and pollutant transport in buildings. These buildings will be used to model airflow and pollutant transport for emergency response scenarios when limited site-specific information is available and immediate decisions must be made, and to better understand key features of buildings controlling occupant exposures to indoor pollutant sources. This paper presents an example of this approach for a prototypical intermediate-sized, open style, commercial building. Interzonal transport due to a short-term source release, e.g., accidental chemical spill, in the bottom and the upper floors is predicted and corresponding HVAC system operation effects and potential responses are considered. Three-hour average exposure estimates are used to compare effects of source location and HVAC operation.
Date: June 1, 1999
Creator: Sohn, M.D.; Daisey, J.M. & Feustel, H.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Monitoring and data analysis for the Vadose Zone Monitoring System (VZMS), McClellan AFB. Quarterly status report

Description: This report contains information on field and laboratory work performed between January and May 15th 1997 at site S-7 in IC 34, at McClellan AFB. At this location, a Vadose Zone Monitoring System (VZMS) is currently being used to collect subsurface data including hydraulic potential, soil gas pressure, moisture content, water chemistry, gas chemistry, and temperature. Due to delays in the completion of the above-ground installations, data collection did not commence until mid-February. As a result, the data presented in this report is preliminary.
Date: May 28, 1997
Creator: Zawislanski, P.T.; Salve, R. & Freifeld, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Site-specific meteorology identification for DOE facility accident analysis

Description: Currently, chemical dispersion calculations performed for safety analysis of DOE facilities assume a Pasquill D-Stability Class with a 4.5 m/s windspeed. These meteorological conditions are assumed to conservatively address the source term generation mechanism as well as the dispersion mechanism thereby resulting in a net conservative downwind consequence. While choosing this Stability Class / Windspeed combination may result in an overall conservative consequence, the level of conservative can not be quantified. The intent of this paper is to document a methodology which incorporates site-specific meteorology to determine a quantifiable consequence of a chemical release. A five-year meteorological database, appropriate for the facility location, is utilized for these chemical consequence calculations, and is consistent with the approach used for radiological releases. The hourly averages of meteorological conditions have been binned into 21 groups for the chemical consequence calculations. These 21 cases each have a probability of occurrence based on the number of times each case has occurred over the five year sampling period. A code has been developed which automates the running of all the cases with a commercially available air modeling code. The 21 cases are sorted by concentration. A concentration may be selected by the user for a quantified level of conservatism. The methodology presented is intended to improve the technical accuracy and defensability of Chemical Source Term / Dispersion Safety Analysis work. The result improves the quality of safety analyses products without significantly increasing the cost.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Rabin, S.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2000 Report

Description: The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of he Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2000. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance,(3) ecosystem mapping, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 24 NTS projects. Seventeen sites were in desert tortoise habitat, and six acres of tortoise habitat were documented as being disturbed this year. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types o n the NTS was completed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Sitewide inventories were conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, raptor nests, and mule deer. Fifty-nine of 69 known owl burrows were monitored. Forty-four of the known burrows are in disturbed habitat. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid-March to early April. A total of 45 juvenile owls was detected from eight breeding pairs. One nest burrow was detected in the Mojave Desert,one in the Great Basin Desert, ...
Date: December 1, 2000
Creator: Wills, C.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comprehensive default methodology for the analysis of exposures to mixtures of chemicals accidentally released to the atmosphere

Description: Safety analysis of Department of Energy (DOE) facilities requires consideration of potential exposures to mixtures of chemicals released to the atmosphere. Exposure to chemical mixtures may lead to additive, synergistic, or antagonistic health effects. In the past, the consequences of each chemical have been analyzed separately. This approach may not adequately protect the health of persons exposed to mixtures. However, considerable time would be required to evaluate all possible mixtures. The objective of this paper is to present reasonable default methodology developed by the EFCOG Safety Analysis Working Group Nonradiological Hazardous Material Subgroup (NHMS) for use in safety analysis within the DOE Complex.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Craig, D.K.; Baskett, R.L.; Powell, T.J.; Davis, J.S.; Dukes, L.L.; Hansen, D.J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A simulation and decision analysis approach to locating DNAPL in subsurface sediments

Description: This report presents a strategy for delineating the location of residual dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) that combines probabilistic simulations of DNAPL spill location and volume, geologic texture constraining migration pathways, migration physics through percolation modeling, and a decision analysis model to pick optimal locations for sampling wells. The authors` strategy is an iterative process of simulating the residual DNAPL location, selecting new locations for data collection, gathering data, and then using the data to condition further simulations of DNAPL migration. As they iterate through this process, data worth analysis is used to determine an appropriate stopping point. The authors present the results from a preliminary version of their model, showing how the process was used to delineate hypothetical DNAPL spills.
Date: September 1, 1997
Creator: Borchers, B.; Conrad, S.H. & Webb, E.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PEAC{trademark} value-added project. Final report

Description: Chemical spill emergencies are exacerbated by a lack of information at the scene with which to quickly assess the situation and determine the appropriate protective action. WRI has concluded that the most successful emergency tools (models) for predicting toxic cloud behavior are those that use field test data as part of their development. After analyzing more than 100 real-world chemical spill accidents and field test releases, WRI has also concluded that information from dense gas/toxic models must be communicated in a fast, simple way to emergency responders or it will not be used. In an effort to address this technology gap, WRI has developed PEAC{trademark} (Palmtop Emergency Action for Chemicals). PEAC is an innovative tool that combines hardware, software, data bases developed by WRI and other organizations, and a unique approach to modeling protective action distances tested with actual field data. PEAC brings modeling data and other reference sources together in a single piece of portable equipment to help emergency responders evaluate a chemical spill incident and quickly determine protective action distances.
Date: September 1, 1997
Creator: Sheesley, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Numerical and experimental investigation of vortical flow-flame interaction

Description: A massively parallel coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian low Mach number reacting flow code is developed and used to study the structure and dynamics of a forced planar buoyant jet flame in two dimensions. The numerical construction uses a finite difference scheme with adaptive mesh refinement for solving the scalar conservation equations, and the vortex method for the momentum equations, with the necessary coupling terms. The numerical model construction is presented, along with computational issues regarding the parallel implementation. An experimental acoustically forced planar jet burner apparatus is also developed and used to study the velocity and scalar fields in this flow, and to provide useful data for validation of the computed jet. Burner design and laser diagnostic details are discussed, along with the measured laboratory jet flame dynamics. The computed reacting jet flow is also presented, with focus on both large-scale outer buoyant structures and the lifted flame stabilization dynamics. A triple flame structure is observed at the flame base in the computed flow, as is theoretically expected, but was not observable with present diagnostic techniques in the laboratory flame. Computed and experimental results are compared, along with implications for model improvements.
Date: February 1, 1998
Creator: Najm, H.N.; Schefer, R.W.; Milne, R.B.; Mueller, C.J.; Devine, K.D. & Kempka, S.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary results of the APAC spills working group

Description: The Spills Working Group is one of 6 working groups under the DOE-DP Accident Phenomenology and Consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation program. Objectives are to assess methodologies available in this area, evaluate their adequacy for accident analysis at DOE facilities, identify development needs, and define standard practices to be followed in the analyses supporting facility safety basis documentation. The group focused on methodologies for estimating 4 types of spill source terms: liquid chemical spills and evaporation, pressurized liquid/gas releases, solid spills and resuspension/sublimation, and resuspension of particulate matter from liquid spills. Computer models were identified with capabilities for quantifying release rates or released amounts from spills, and a set of sample test problems was established for evaluating a specific model for some common or probable accident release scenarios. The group agreed on a set of recommended computer codes which are classified according to spill type and hazard category. Code results for a given problem varied by up to an order of magnitude; this is attributed to differences in how the physics and thermodynamics of the problems were treated by the models.
Date: April 1, 1996
Creator: Brereton, S.; Hesse, D.; kalinich, D.; Lazaro, M.; Mubayi, V. & Shinn, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Comparison of EPIcode and ALOHA Calculations for Pool Evaporation and Chemical Atmospheric Transport and Dispersion.

Description: EPIcode (version 7.0) and ALOHA (version 5.2.3) are two of the designated toolbox codes identified in the Department of Energy's Implementation Plan for DNFSB Recommendation 2002-1 on Software Quality Assurance issues in the DOE Complex. Both have the capability to estimate evaporation rates from pools formed from chemical spills and to predict subsequent atmospheric transport and dispersion. This paper provides an overview of the algorithms used by EPIcode and ALOHA to calculate evaporation rates and downwind plume concentrations. The technical bases for these algorithms are briefly discussed, and differences in the EPIcode and ALOHA methodologies highlighted. In addition, sample calculations are performed using EPIcode and ALOHA for selected chemicals under various environmental conditions. Side-by-side comparisons of results from sample calculations are analyzed to illustrate the impact that the different methodologies used by EPIcode and ALOHA have on predicted evaporation rates and downwind concentrations.
Date: April 22, 2005
Creator: Andrew, VINCENT
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Probabilistic consequence model of accidenal or intentional chemical releases.

Description: In this work, general methodologies for evaluating the impacts of large-scale toxic chemical releases are proposed. The potential numbers of injuries and fatalities, the numbers of hospital beds, and the geographical areas rendered unusable during and some time after the occurrence and passage of a toxic plume are estimated on a probabilistic basis. To arrive at these estimates, historical accidental release data, maximum stored volumes, and meteorological data were used as inputs into the SLAB accidental chemical release model. Toxic gas footprints from the model were overlaid onto detailed population and hospital distribution data for a given region to estimate potential impacts. Output results are in the form of a generic statistical distribution of injuries and fatalities associated with specific toxic chemicals and regions of the United States. In addition, indoor hazards were estimated, so the model can provide contingency plans for either shelter-in-place or evacuation when an accident occurs. The stochastic distributions of injuries and fatalities are being used in a U.S. Department of Homeland Security-sponsored decision support system as source terms for a Monte Carlo simulation that evaluates potential measures for mitigating terrorist threats. This information can also be used to support the formulation of evacuation plans and to estimate damage and cleanup costs.
Date: June 2, 2008
Creator: Chang, Y.-S.; Samsa, M. E.; Folga, S. M. & Hartmann, H. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Emergency First Responders' Experience with Colorimetric Detection Methods

Description: Nationwide, first responders from state and federal support teams respond to hazardous materials incidents, industrial chemical spills, and potential weapons of mass destruction (WMD) attacks. Although first responders have sophisticated chemical, biological, radiological, and explosive detectors available for assessment of the incident scene, simple colorimetric detectors have a role in response actions. The large number of colorimetric chemical detection methods available on the market can make the selection of the proper methods difficult. Although each detector has unique aspects to provide qualitative or quantitative data about the unknown chemicals present, not all detectors provide consistent, accurate, and reliable results. Included here, in a consumer-report-style format, we provide “boots on the ground” information directly from first responders about how well colorimetric chemical detection methods meet their needs in the field and how they procure these methods.
Date: October 1, 2007
Creator: Fox, Sandra L.; Daum, Keith A.; Miller, Carla J. & Cortez, Marnie M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Activities to support the liquefied gaseous fuels spill test facility program. Final report

Description: Approximately a hundred years ago the petrochemical industry was in its infancy, while the chemical industry was already well established. Today, both of these industries, which are almost indistinguishable, are a substantial part of the makeup of the U.S. economy and the lifestyle we enjoy. It is difficult to identify a single segment of our daily lives that isn`t affected by these industries and the products or services they make available for our use. Their survival and continued function in a competitive world market are necessary to maintain our current standard of living. The occurrence of accidents in these industries has two obvious effects: (1) the loss of product during the accident and future productivity because of loss of a portion of a facility or transport medium, and (2) the potential loss of life or injury to individuals, whether workers, emergency responders, or members of the general public. A great deal of work has been conducted at the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill test Facility (LGFSTF) on hazardous spills. WRI has conducted accident investigations as well as provided information on the research results via the internet and bibliographies.
Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: Sheesley, D.; King, S.B. & Routh, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Source Term Determination for Spills of Binary Liquid Solutions

Description: The methodology in this report results in the determination of an average vapor pressure over a predetermined time period of interest. The time period of interest is based on whether the most limiting constituent partial pressure increases or decreases over time. This average partial pressure is then used for determination of source terms for spills of the solution.
Date: January 6, 1997
Creator: Blanchard, A. & Hadlock, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final report of the accident phenomenology and consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation. Spills Working Group

Description: The Spills Working Group was one of six working groups established under the Accident Phenomenology and Consequence (APAC) methodology evaluation program. The objectives of APAC were to assess methodologies available in the accident phenomenology and consequence analysis area and to evaluate their adequacy for use in preparing DOE facility safety basis documentation, such as Basis for Interim Operation (BIO), Justification for Continued Operation (JCO), Hazard Analysis Documents, and Safety Analysis Reports (SARs). Additional objectives of APAC were to identify development needs and to define standard practices to be followed in the analyses supporting facility safety basis documentation. The Spills Working Group focused on methodologies for estimating four types of spill source terms: liquid chemical spills and evaporation, pressurized liquid/gas releases, solid spills and resuspension/sublimation, and resuspension of particulate matter from liquid spills.
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Brereton, S.; Shinn, J.; Hesse, D; Kaninich, D.; Lazaro, M. & Mubayi, V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Three-dimensional model for simulating atmospheric dispersion of heavy-gases over complex terrain

Description: To help understand heavy gas releases and simulate the resultant dispersion, we have developed a three-dimensional finite element model called FEM3 and an improved version names FEM3A for solving the time dependent conservation equations based on generalized anelastic approximation. Recent enhancements to the model to include the treatment of dispersion scenarios involving density variations much larger than the liquefied natural gas range and an advanced turbulence submodel based on the buoyancy-extended transport equations. This paper presents the main features of the present model FEM3C and numerical results from the simulations of a field-scale LNG spill experiment.
Date: September 1, 1997
Creator: Chan, S.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department