168 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

The development of the shadow analysis team concept

Description: Part II, Section E, Paragraphs 52-55 of the {open_quotes}Verification Annex{close_quotes} (Annex 2) of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) provides the general rights and obligations of both the Inspected State Party (ISP) and the Inspection Team (IT) as to the collection and analysis of samples. In summary, the inspection team has the right to request the collection of samples which will be collected by the ISP unless the decision is made by the ISP to allow the inspectors to collect them. Samples will, if possible, be analyzed at the inspection site, with the assistance of the ISP if requested by the IT. The ISP has the right to retain portions all collected samples. Samples may be sent off-site for independent analysis if deemed necessary. These rights are modified in the case of {open_quotes}Challenge Inspections{close_quotes} by the {open_quotes}Managed Access{close_quotes} Provisions of Part X, Section C, Paragraphs 4648 which specifies that sample collection is to be negotiated between the Inspection Team and the Inspected State Party. In order to assist the ISP in fulfilling its obligation to assist the IT in determining compliance, and in preserving its rights to protect sensitive information not relevant to the CWC, we propose to establish the Army Material Command Treaty Laboratory (AMCTL) Shadow Analysis Team.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: McGuire, R.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reevaluation of 1999 Health-Based Environmental Screening Levels (HBESLs) for Chemical Warfare Agents

Description: This report evaluates whether new information and updated scientific models require that changes be made to previously published health-based environmental soil screening levels (HBESLs) and associated environmental fate/breakdown information for chemical warfare agents (USACHPPM 1999). Specifically, the present evaluation describes and compares changes that have been made since 1999 to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) risk assessment models, EPA exposure assumptions, as well as to specific chemical warfare agent parameters (e.g., toxicity values). Comparison was made between screening value estimates recalculated with current assumptions and earlier health-based environmental screening levels presented in 1999. The chemical warfare agents evaluated include the G-series and VX nerve agents and the vesicants sulfur mustard (agent HD) and Lewisite (agent L). In addition, key degradation products of these agents were also evaluated. Study findings indicate that the combined effect of updates and/or changes to EPA risk models, EPA default exposure parameters, and certain chemical warfare agent toxicity criteria does not result in significant alteration to the USACHPPM (1999) health-based environmental screening level estimates for the G-series and VX nerve agents or the vesicant agents HD and L. Given that EPA's final position on separate Tier 1 screening levels for indoor and outdoor worker screening assessments has not yet been released as of May 2007, the study authors find that the 1999 screening level estimates (see Table ES.1) are still appropriate and protective for screening residential as well as nonresidential sites. As such, risk management decisions made on the basis of USACHPPM (1999) recommendations do not require reconsideration. While the 1999 HBESL values are appropriate for continued use as general screening criteria, the updated '2007' estimates (presented below) that follow the new EPA protocols currently under development are also protective. When EPA finalizes and documents a position on the matter of indoor and outdoor worker screening ...
Date: May 1, 2007
Creator: Watson, Annetta Paule & Dolislager, Fredrick G
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Contamination source review for Building E3236, Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

Description: The US Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) commissioned Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to conduct a contamination source review to identify and define areas of toxic or hazardous contaminants and to assess the physical condition and accessibility of APG buildings. The information obtained from the review may be used to assist the US Army in planning for the future use or disposition of the buildings. The contamination source review consisted of the following tasks: historical records search, physical inspection, photographic documentation, geophysical investigation, and review of available records regarding underground storage tanks associated with each building. This report provides the results of the contamination source review for Building E3236. Many of the APG facilities constructed between 1917 and the 1960s are no longer used because of obsolescence and their poor state of repair. Because many of these buildings were used for research, development, testing, and/or pilot- scale production of chemical warfare agents and other military substances, the potential exists for portions of the buildings to be contaminated with these substances, their degradation products, and other laboratory or industrial chemicals. These buildings and associated structures or appurtenances may contribute to environmental concerns at APG.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Zellmer, S.D.; Smits, M.P.; Draugelis, A.K.; Glennon, M.A.; Rueda, J. & Zimmerman, R.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Destruction of VX by aqueous-phase oxidation using peroxydisulfate (direct chemical oxidation)

Description: Chemical warfare agents may be completely destroyed (converted to H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, salts) by oxidation at 90--100 C using acidified ammonium peroxydisulfate, with recycle of NH{sub 4}SO{sub 4} byproduct. The process requires no toxic or expended catalysts and produces no secondary wastes other than the precipitated inorganic content of the agents. To determine oxidative capability of peroxydisulfate at low reductant contents, we measured rate data for oxidation of 20 diverse compounds with diverse functional groups; 4 of these have bonds similar to those found in VX, HD, and GB. On an equivalence basis, integral first-order rate constants for 100 C oxidation are 0.012{plus_minus}0.005 min{sup {minus}1} for di-isopropyl-methyl-phosphonate, methyl phosphonic acid, triethylamine, and 2,2{prime}-thiodiethanol at low initial concentrations of 50 ppM(as carbon) and pH 1.5. To provide scale-up equations for a bulk chemical agent destruction process, we measured time-dependent oxidation of bulk model chemicals at high concentrations (0.5 N) and developed and tested a quantitative model. A practical process for bulk VX destruction would begin with chemical detoxification by existing techniques (eg, hydrolysis or mild oxidation using oxone), followed by mineralization of the largely detoxified products by peroxydisulfate. Secondary wastes would be avoided by use of commercial electrolysis equipment to regenerate the oxidant. Reagent requirements, mass balance and scaleup parameters are given for VX destruction, using peroxydisulfate alone, or supplemented with hydrogen peroxide. For the use of 2.5 N peroxydisulfate as the oxidant, a 1 m{sup 3} digester will process about 200 kg (as C) per day. The process may be extended to total destruction of HD and hydrolysis products of G agents.
Date: October 11, 1995
Creator: Cooper, J.F.; Krueger, R. & Farmer, J.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pathways for the Oxidation of Sarin in Urban Atmospheres

Description: Terrorists have threatened and carried out chemicalhiological agent attacks on targets in major cities. The nerve agent sarin figured prominently in one well-publicized incident. Vapors disseminating from open containers in a Tokyo subway caused thousands of casualties. High-resolution tracer transport modeling of agent dispersion is at hand and will be enhanced by data on reactions with components of the urban atmosphere. As a sample of the level of complexity currently attainable, we elaborate the mechanisms by which sarin can decompose in polluted air. A release scenario is outlined involving the passage of a gas-phase agent through a city locale in the daytime. The atmospheric chemistry database on related organophosphorus pesticides is mined for rate and product information. The hydroxyl,radical and fine-mode particles are identified as major reactants. A review of urban air chernistry/rnicrophysics generates concentration tables for major oxidant and aerosol types in both clean and dirty environments. Organic structure-reactivity relationships yield an upper limit of 10-1' cm3 molecule-' S-* for hydrogen abstraction by hydroxyl. The associated midday loss time scale could be as little as one hour. Product distributions are difficult to define but may include nontoxic organic oxygenates, inorganic phosphorus acids, sarin-like aldehydes, and nitrates preserving cholinergic capabilities. Agent molecules will contact aerosol surfaces in on the order of minutes, with hydrolysis and side-chain oxidation as likely reaction channels.
Date: November 1, 1998
Creator: Streit, Gerald E.; Bossert, James E.; Gaffney, Jeffrey S.; Reisner, Jon; McNair, Laurie A.; Brown, Michael et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Implementing the chemical weapons convention: The nuts and bolts of compliance

Description: This paper is a presentation prepared for the American Bar Association in which the author discusses the issue of rights to privacy in the United States in the face of implementing the Chemical Weapons Convention inspections. The author points out that there are no clear precedents in law which deal with all the issues which will result from international inspections for verification which are required by the treaty. In particular as inspections tread on the issue of personal rights or private property there is a fairly ill defined legal area which needs to be developed to allow such inspections in the face of constitutional guarantees.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Tanzman, E.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Remedial investigation sampling and analysis plan for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland: Volume 2, Quality Assurance Project Plan

Description: J-Field encompasses about 460 acres at the southern end of the Gunpowder Neck Peninsula in the Edgewood Area of APG (Figure 2.1). Since World War II, the Edgewood Area of APG has been used to develop, manufacture, test, and destroy chemical agents and munitions. These materials were destroyed at J-Field by open burning and open detonation (OB/OD). For the purposes of this project, J-Field has been divided into eight geographic areas or facilities that are designated as areas of concern (AOCs): the Toxic Burning Pits (TBP), the White Phosphorus Burning Pits (WPP), the Riot Control Burning Pit (RCP), the Robins Point Demolition Ground (RPDG), the Robins Point Tower Site (RPTS), the South Beach Demolition Ground (SBDG), the South Beach Trench (SBT), and the Prototype Building (PB). The scope of this project is to conduct a remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and ecological risk assessment to evaluate the impacts of past disposal activities at the J-Field site. Sampling for the RI will be carried out in three stages (I, II, and III) as detailed in the FSP. A phased approach will be used for the J-Field ecological risk assessment (ERA).
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Prasad, S.; Martino, L. & Patton, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Steps towards universality of the Chemical Weapons Convention: How can Africa contribute?

Description: Universality is a fundamental principal of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). It suffuses the fabric of the Convention, found not only in the very first ringing clauses of Article I, but also in the many technical details of its Annexes and Schedules. Consequently, universality is a topic on which commentary is appropriate from all quarters. The author offers his personal views as a lawyer on this important matter in the hope that, this distinguished audience may gain a perspective not available from practitioners of other professions. The views expressed in this paper are those of the author alone, and do not represent the position of the government of the US or of any other institution.
Date: November 2, 1999
Creator: Tanzman, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Implementing the chemical weapons convention

Description: In 1993, as the CWC ratification process was beginning, concerns arose that the complexity of integrating the CWC with national law could cause each nation to implement the Convention without regard to what other nations were doing, thereby causing inconsistencies among States as to how the CWC would be carried out. As a result, the author's colleagues and the author prepared the Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention and presented it to each national delegation at the December 1993 meeting of the Preparatory Commission in The Hague. During its preparation, the Committee of CWC Legal Experts, a group of distinguished international jurists, law professors, legally-trained diplomats, government officials, and Parliamentarians from every region of the world, including Central Europe, reviewed the Manual. In February 1998, they finished the second edition of the Manual in order to update it in light of developments since the CWC entered into force on 29 April 1997. The Manual tries to increase understanding of the Convention by identifying its obligations and suggesting methods of meeting them. Education about CWC obligations and available alternatives to comply with these requirements can facilitate national response that are consistent among States Parties. Thus, the Manual offers options that can strengthen international realization of the Convention's goals if States Parties act compatibly in implementing them. Equally important, it is intended to build confidence that the legal issues raised by the Convention are finite and addressable. They are now nearing competition of an internet version of this document so that interested persons can access it electronically and can view the full text of all of the national implementing legislation it cites. The internet address, or URL, for the internet version of the Manual is http: //www.cwc.ard.gov. This paper draws from the Manual. It comparatively addresses approximately thirty implementing ...
Date: December 7, 1999
Creator: Kellman, B. & Tanzman, E. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigations of emergency destruction methods for recovered, explosively configured, chemical warfare munitions: Interim emergency destruction methods - evaluation report

Description: At the request of the U.S. Army Non-Stockpile Chemical Material Office, the Sandia Explosives Containment System Design Team investigated mature destruction systems for destroying recovered chemical warfare munitions (CWM). The goal of the investigations was to identify and examine available techniques for the destruction of recovered CWM. The result of this study is a recommendation for an interim solution, a solution for use on any munitions found while an optimal, long-term solution is developed. Sandia is also performing the long-term solution study to develop a system that destroys CWM, contains the blast and fragments, and destroys the chemical agent without insult to the environment.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Baer, M.R.; Cooper, P.W. & Kipp, M.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Expedient Respiratory and Physical Protection: Does a Wet Towel Work to Prevent Chemical Warfare Agent Vapor Infiltration?

Description: The purpose of this paper is to examine the effectiveness of expedient protection strategies to reduce exposure to vapors from chemical warfare agents. This includes an examination of the physical and the psychological effectiveness of measures such as using a wet towel to seal a door jam against the infiltration of chemicals while sheltering in place or to provide expedient respiratory protection. Respiratory protection for civilians has never been considered a viable option for population protection in the CSEPP. Problems of storage, ability to effectively don respirators, and questionable fit have been primary factors in rejecting this option. Expedient respiratory protection seems to offer little benefits for population protection for chemical agent vapors. Furthermore, using wet towels as a vapor barrier at the bottom of a door should be discouraged. The wetted towel provides no vapor filtration and its effectiveness in infiltration reduction is unknown. Taping the bottom of the door will still likely provide greater infiltration reduction and is recommended as the current method for use in sheltering.
Date: August 30, 2002
Creator: Sorensen, J. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An environmental sampling model for combining judgment and randomly placed samples

Description: In the event of the release of a lethal agent (such as anthrax) inside a building, law enforcement and public health responders take samples to identify and characterize the contamination. Sample locations may be rapidly chosen based on available incident details and professional judgment. To achieve greater confidence of whether or not a room or zone was contaminated, or to certify that detectable contamination is not present after decontamination, we consider a Bayesian model for combining the information gained from both judgment and randomly placed samples. We investigate the sensitivity of the model to the parameter inputs and make recommendations for its practical use.
Date: August 23, 2007
Creator: Sego, Landon H.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Matzke, Brett D.; Sieber, Karl; Shulman, Stanley; Bennett, James et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Deployment of a Continuously Operated {mu}ChemLab

Description: A continuously operating prototype chemical weapons sensor system based on the {mu}ChemLab{trademark} technology was installed in the San Francisco International Airport in late June 2002. This prototype was assembled in a National Electric Manufacturers Association (NEMA) enclosure and controlled by a personal computer collocated with it. Data from the prototype was downloaded regularly and periodic calibration tests were performed through modem-operated control. The instrument was installed just downstream of the return air fans in the return air plenum of a high-use area of a boarding area. A CW Sentry, manufactured by Microsensor Systems, was installed alongside the {mu}ChemLab unit and results from its operation are reported elsewhere. Tests began on June 26, 2002 and concluded on October 16, 2002. This report will discuss the performance of the prototype during the continuous testing period. Over 70,000 test cycles were performed during this period. Data from this first field emplacement have indicated several areas where engineering improvements can be made for future field emplacement.
Date: May 1, 2003
Creator: ADKINS, DOUGLAS R.; KOTTENSTETTE, RICHARD; LEWIS, PATRICK R.; DULLECK JR., GEORGE R.; OBORNY, MICHAEL C.; GORDON, SUSANNA P. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling Dispersion of Chemical-Biological Agents in Three Dimensional Living Space

Description: This report documents a series of calculations designed to demonstrate Sandia's capability in modeling the dispersal of chemical and biological agents in complex three-dimensional spaces. The transport of particles representing biological agents is modeled in a single room and in several connected rooms. The influence of particle size, particle weight and injection method are studied.
Date: February 1, 2002
Creator: Winters, William S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technical basis for chemical stockpile emergency planning

Description: As part of the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program, an Accident Planning Base Review Group (APBRG) was convened in December 1992. The APBRG`s mission was to update the accident basis for protective action strategy planning in the vicinity of eight US chemical agent stockpile sites. The results of the APBRG`s work are being issued as site-specific Emergency Planning Guides (EPGs). The EPGs give emergency planners--Army, State, and local--updated assessment of the chemical hazard and guidance on how to plan for a broad range of accidents by planning for a manageable number of accident categories. This paper addresses: (1) the rationale for updating the accident planning base; (2) the modeling methodology used to assess the chemical hazard; and (3) strategies that are advocated in the EPGs for the use of models by planners.
Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Newsom, D.E.; Madore, M.A.; Paddock, R.A. & Absil, M.J.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Contamination source review for Building E6891, Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland

Description: The US Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) commissioned Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to conduct a contamination source review to identify and define areas of toxic or hazardous contaminants and to assess the physical condition and accessibility of various APG buildings. This report provides the results of the contamination source review for Building E6891. The information obtained from this review may be used to assist the US Army in planning for the future use or disposition of the buildings. The contamination source review consisted of the following tasks: historical records search, physical inspection, photographic documentation, geophysical investigation, and collection of air samples. This building is part of the Lauderick Creek Concrete Slab Test Site, located in the Lauderick Creek Area in the Edgewood Area. Many of the APG facilities constructed between 1917 and the 1960s are no longer used because of obsolescence and their poor state of repair. Because many of these buildings were used for research, development, testing, and/or pilot-scale production of chemical warfare agents and other military substances the potential exists` for portions of the buildings to be contaminated with these substances, their degradation products, and other laboratory or industrial chemicals. These buildings and associated structures or appurtenances may contribute to environmental concerns at APG.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Zellmer, S.D.; Draugelis, A.K.; Rueda, J. & Zimmerman, R.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solid Phase Microextraction and Miniature Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

Description: A miniature mass spectrometer, based on the time-of-flight principle, has been developed for the detection of chemical warfare agent precursor molecules. The instrument, with minor modifications, could fulfill many of the needs for sensing organic molecules in various Defense Programs, including Enhanced Surveillance. The basic footprint of the instrument is about that of a lunch box. The instrument has a mass range to about 300, has parts-per-trillion detection limits, and can return spectra in less than a second. The instrument can also detect permanent gases and is especially sensitive to hydrogen. In volume, the device could be manufactured for under $5000.
Date: January 26, 1999
Creator: Hiller, j.m.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RCRA delisting of agent-decontaminated waste and remediation waste at Dugway Proving Ground: A program update

Description: In July 1988, the state of Utah issued regulations that declared residues resulting from the demilitarization, treatment, and testing of military chemical agents to be hazardous wastes. These residues were designated as corrosive, reactive, toxic, and acute hazardous (Hazardous Waste No. F999). These residues are not listed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), which is the primary law governing management of hazardous waste in the United States. The RCRAI regulations (40 CFR 260-280), the Utah Administrative Code (R-315), and other state hazardous waste programs list specific wastes as hazardous but allow generators to petition the regulator to {open_quotes}delist{close_quotes} if it can be demonstrated that such wastes are not hazardous. In 1994, the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command FECOM initiated a project with the Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to demonstrate that certain categories of F999 residues are not hazardous waste and to achieve delisting. The initial focus is on delisting agent-decontaminated residues and soil with a history of contamination at the U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground (DPG), Utah. An overview of the DPG delisting program was presented at the 1995 American Defense Preparedness Association Environmental Symposium. Since that time, much progress has been made. The purpose of this paper is to review the DPG delisting program and discuss overall progress. Emphasis is placed on progress with regard to analytical methods that will be used to demonstrate that the target residues do not contain hazardous amounts of chemical agent.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Kimmell, T. A.; Anderson, A. W. & O`Neill, H. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mobile munitions assessment system design, testing, operational experience

Description: The remnants of America`s chemical weapons program exist at more than 200 sites in the United States. The U.S. Army`s Project Manager for Non-stockpile Chemical Material (PMNSCM) has the responsibility for the remediation of non-stockpile chemical warfare material (CWM). PMNSCM must respond to a variety of situations involving discovered, recovered or buried material. This response requires unique hardware capabilities to characterize, assess, and provide information to develop plans for disposing of the material. PMNSCM sponsored the development of a Mobile Munitions Assessment System (MMAS) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to meet the need to characterize and assess non-stockpile chemical warfare material. The MMAS equipment is capable of distinguishing CWM from conventional munitions, identifying the agent fill and level, and assessing the status of the firing train. The MMAS has a data processing, collection, and storage subsystem and a communications link to a Dugway Proving Ground (DPG) database. A typical data package includes X-rays, elemental spectra, weather data, physical descriptions, photographs, video, etc. The MMAS data will be used by the Army`s Munition Assessment and Review Board (MARB) to help determine the appropriate methods and safeguards necessary to store, transport, and dispose of non-stockpile CWM.
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Watts, K.D.; Snyder, A.M. & Rowe, L.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct chemical oxidation: applications to demilitarization and decontamination

Description: The applicability of using aqueous solutions of sodium peroxydisulfate in the destruction of mustard gas surrogates has been demonstrated. This technique, known as Direct Chemical Oxidation (DCO), resulted in oxidative destruction of these surrogates, and a refinement was added to prevent the formation of slow-to-oxidize intermediates. Specifically, it was shown that `one-armed mustard` gas could be hydrolyzed to thiodiethanol and free chloride ion, and this species could then be partially oxidized to either the sulfoxide or sulfone depending on oxidant stoichiometry. Hydrolysis was accomplished on a mild basic solution at ambient temperature over a number of hours; oxidation was carried out at 90{degrees}C using peroxydisulfate solutions, Partial oxidation of thiodiethanol in the presence of chloride under basic conditions resulted in a a substantially pure mixture of the corresponding sulfone and sulfoxide, with no formation of chlorine gas. Analogous experiments in acid solutions produced a more complex mix of products and some oxidant was consumed in the evolution of chlorine. Complete destruction of the surrogates (to ppm level of detection) was achieved in either acid or base solution with less than a 7-fold excess of oxidant.
Date: April 1, 1998
Creator: Cooper, J.F.; Balazs, B. & Lewis, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Primary tasks to implement the Chemical Weapons Convention

Description: The Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) is an unprecedented multilateral effort to eradicate an entire category of weapons of mass destruction and assure their continued absence through international verification. In 1993, concerns arose that the complexity of integrating the treaty with national law could cause some nations to implement the Convention without regard to what others nations were doing, thereby causing inconsistencies among States Parties in how the Conventional would be carried out. As a result, the Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention was prepared. The Manual is designed to assist States Parties by increasing understanding of the Convention and identifying its obligations as well as suggesting methods to meet them, duly taking into account the distinctive aspects of their legal systems. It acknowledges areas of ambiguity that States Parties should address, and it analyzes legal initiatives that may be undertaken to strengthen the Convention`s enforcement. This paper draws from the Manual and briefly addresses the two tasks that every CWC State Party must undertake first in order to effectively fulfill its extensive requirements. First, each State Party must establish a National Authority. Second, each State Party must enact implementing measures to ensure that its government as well as its businesses and citizens comply with the treaty. As this paper generally discusses how States Parties from different legal backgrounds can accomplish these two tasks, it cannot address every detail of how each State Party should proceed.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Kellman, B. & Tanzman, E.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A guide to the selection of personal protective equipment for use in responding to a release of chemical warfare agents

Description: Recognition by the US Army that a potential threat to the public from continued storage was potentially as great a threat as from transportation and the final demilitarization of chemical agents gave rise to the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP). CSEPP is a civilian community emergency preparedness program complementing the Department of Defense`s initiative to destroy domestic stockpiles of aged chemical warface munitions. An incident involving chemical warfare agents requires a unique hazardous materials (HAZMAT) response. As with any HAZMAT event, federal regulations prescribe that responders must be protected from exposure to the chemical agents. But unlike other HAZMAT events, special considerations govern the selection of personal protective equipment (PPE). PPE includes all clothing, respirators and detection equipment used to respond to a chemical release. PPE can differ depending on whether responders are military or civilian personnel. FEMA requested that ORNL create training materials for CSEPP participants. These training materials were to provide information on a variety of topics and answer questions that a typical CSEPP participant might ask, including the following: how did the Army select the CSEPP recommended ensemble (i.e., protective clothing, respiratory equipment, and detection equipment); how does the CSEPP participant know this ensemble is the right PPE for chemical warfare agents and will actually protect him; what are the concept of operations and work rules? Does one need to know what the CSEPP concept of operations and work rules include? This report describes the training document ORNL created.
Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: Foust, C.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Emergency destruction system for recovered chemical munitions

Description: At the request of the US Army Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel, Sandia National Laboratories is developing a transportable system for destroying recovered, explosively configured, chemical warfare munitions. The system uses shaped charges to access the agent and burster followed by chemical neutralization to destroy them. The entire process takes place inside a sealed pressure vessel. In this paper, they review the design, operation, and testing of a prototype system capable of containing up to one pound of explosive.
Date: April 1, 1998
Creator: Shepodd, T.J.; Stofleth, J.H. & Haroldsen, B.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Hydrolysis of Di-Isopropyl Methylphosphonate in Ground Water

Description: Di-isopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP) is a byproduct from the manufacture of the nerve agent Sarin. The persistence of DIMP in the ground water is an important question in evaluating the potential environmental impacts of DIMP contamination. The half-life of DIMP in ground water at 10 deg C was estimated to be 500 years with a 95% confidence interval of 447 to 559 years from measurements of the hydrolysis rates at temperatures between 70 to 98 deg C.Extrapolation of the kinetics to 10 deg C used the Arrhenius equation, and calculation of the half-life assumed first-order kinetics. Inorganic phosphate was not detected.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Sega, G.A., Tomkins, B.A., Griest, W.H., Bayne, C.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department