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Causes of Variation in Chemical Analyses and Physical Tests of Portland Cement

Description: Report discussing variations in comparative tests of portland cements that could lead to the rejection of a material fully conforming to specification requirements, or the acceptance of a material with undesirable chemical or physical properties. Many of the causes for variation in chemical analyses and physical test results are listed in this discussion, and remedies for some of the more frequently encountered deficiencies in apparatus and methods are suggested.
Date: April 27, 1961
Creator: Bean, B. Leonard & Dise, John R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory (Part 3)

Description: Various laboratory tests were carried at the R & D facility of BJ Services in Tomball, TX with BJ Services staff to predict and evaluate the performance of the Ceramicrete slurry for its effective use in permafrost cementing operations. Although other standards such as those of the American Standard for Testing Materials (ASTM) and Construction Specification Institute (CSI) exist, all these tests were standardized by the API. A summary of the tests traditionally used in the cement slurry design as well as the API tests reference document are provided in Table 7. All of these tests were performed within the scope of this research to evaluate properties of the Ceramicrete.
Date: December 31, 2008
Creator: 960443, See OSTI ID Number
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DEVELOPMENT OF BYPASSED OIL RESERVES USING BEHIND CASING RESISTIVITY MEASUREMENTS

Description: Tubing and rods of the S.P. Pedro-Nepple No.1 well were pulled and the well was prepared for running of Schlumberger's Cased Hole Formation Resistivity Tool (CHFR) in selected intervals. The CHFR tool was successfully run and data was captured. The CHFR formation resistivity readings were compared to original open hole resistivity measurements. Separation between the original and CHFR resistivity curves indicate both swept and un-swept sand intervals. Both watered out sand intervals and those with higher remaining oil saturation have been identified. Due to the nature of these turbidite sands being stratigraphically continuous, both the swept and unswept layers have been correlated across to one of the four nearby offset shallow wells. As a result of the cased hole logging, one well was selected for a workover to recomplete and test suspected oil saturated shallow sand intervals. Well S.P. Pedro-Nepple No.2 was plugged back with cement excluding the previously existing production interval, squeeze cemented behind casing, selectively perforated in the shallower ''Bell'' zone and placed on production to develop potential new oil reserves and increase overall well productivity. Prior workover production averaged 3.0 BOPD for the previous six-months from the original ''Meyer'' completion interval. Post workover well production was increased to 5.3 BOPD on average for the following fifteen months. In December 2005, a bridge plug was installed above the ''Bell'' zone to test the ''Foix'' zone. Another cement squeeze was performed behind casing, selectively perforated in the shallower ''Foix'' zone and placed on production. The ''Foix'' test has produced water and a trace of oil for two months.
Date: April 2, 2006
Creator: Conner, Michael G. & Blesener, Jeffrey A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CSER 96-013: Cementation Process, glovebox HA-20MB at PFP

Description: This evaluation provides criticality safety controls for the cementation processing in Glovebox HA-2OMB at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Slag and crucible residues from Pu button making will be blended with Portland cement in 5k-in. diam. x 7-in. tall cans, for eventual disposition in special DOT 17C drums. A maximum of 180 g Pu is allowed per liquid-bearing container (mixing bowl, filter funnel, or cement can). In this SD revision, three separate areas with 500 g Pu limits each are established; the airlock cell for input S&C cans, the reaction- and mixing-process area, and a cemented-can storage area. Number and spacing of containers within an area is not restricted, for areas spaced 6 inches apart. Acid addition in the reaction stage is allowed to the extent that plutonium dissolution will not occur.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Hess, A.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

Description: The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra- lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.
Date: October 31, 2003
Creator: Sabins, Fred
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DEVELOPMENT OF BYPASSED OIL RESERVES USING BEHIND CASING RESISTIVITY MEASUREMENTS

Description: Tubing and rods of the S.P. Pedro-Nepple No.1 well were pulled and the well was prepared for running of Schlumberger's Cased Hole Formation Resistivity Tool (CHFR) in selected intervals. The CHFR tool was successfully run and data was captured. The CHFR formation resistivity readings were compared to original open hole resistivity measurements. Separation between the original and CHFR resistivity curves indicate both swept and un-swept sand intervals. Both watered out sand intervals and those with higher remaining oil saturation have been identified. Due to the nature of these turbidite sands being stratigraphically continuous, both the swept and unswept layers have been correlated across to one of the four nearby offset shallow wells. As a result of the cased hole logging, one well was selected for a workover to recomplete high oil saturated shallow sand intervals. During the second report period, well S.P. Pedro-Nepple No.2 was plugged back with cement excluding the previously existing production interval, squeeze cemented behind casing, selectively perforated in the shallower ''Bell'' zone and placed on production to develop potential new oil reserves and increase overall well productivity. Prior workover production averaged 3.0 BOPD for the previous six-months. Post workover well production was marginally increased to 3.7 BOPD on average for the following six months.
Date: February 7, 2005
Creator: Conner, Michael G. & Blesener, Jeffrey A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Supercement for Annular Seal and Long-Term Integrity in Deep, Hot Wells "Deep Trek"

Description: The purpose of this project is to formulate a ''Supercement'' designed for improving the long-term sealing integrity in HPHT wells. Phase I concentrated on chemistry studies and screening tests to design and evaluate Portland-based, hybrid Portland, and non-Portland-based cement systems suitable for further scale-up testing. Phase II work concentrated on additional lab and field testing to reduce the candidate materials list to two systems, as well as scale up activities aimed at verifying performance at the field scale. Phase II was extended thorough a proposal to develop additional testing capabilities aimed at quantifying cementing material properties and performance that were previously not possible. Two materials are being taken into Phase III for field testing and commercialization: {lg_bullet} Highly-expansive cement (Portland-based), patent pending as ''Pre-Stressed Cement'' {lg_bullet} Epoxy Resin (non-Portland-based), patent pending In Phase II, significant effort was expended on scaling up the processes for handling resin in the field, as it is quite different than conventional Portland-based cements in mixing, personnel protection, and cleanup. Through this effort, over fifty (50) field jobs were done at a variety of temperatures and depths, most with excellent results. Large-scale field testing was less relevant with Pre-stressed Cement, because the materials and surface processes do not vary from those that have been developed for conventional Portland materials over the last eighty (80) years. The formulation is quite unique, however, and performs very differently than conventional Portland cements downhole.
Date: August 31, 2005
Creator: Edgley, Kevin D.; Sabins, Fred L. & Watters, Larry T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of Laboratory Scale Fracture Tests on Rock/Cement Interfaces

Description: A number of pure cement and cement-basalt interface samples were subjected to a range of compressive loads to form internal fractures. X-ray microtomography was used to visualize the formation and growth of internal fractures in three dimensions as a function of compressive loads. This laboratory data will be incorporated into a geomechanics model to predict the risk of CO2 leakage through wellbores during geologic carbon storage.
Date: June 1, 2012
Creator: Um, Wooyong & Jung, Hun Bok
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Life-Cycle Assessment Studies of Chinese Cement Production: Challenges and Opportunities

Description: The use of life-cycle assessment (LCA) to understand the embodied energy, environmental impacts, and potential energy-savings of manufactured products has become more widespread among researchers in recent years. This paper reviews recent LCA studies in the cement industry in China and in other countries and provides an assessment of the methodology used by the researchers compared to ISO LCA standards (ISO 14040:2006, ISO 14044:2006, and ISO/TR 14048:2002). We evaluate whether the authors provide information on the intended application, targeted audience, functional unit, system boundary, data sources, data quality assessment, data disaggregation and other elements, and draw conclusions regarding the level of adherence to ISO standards for the papers reviewed. We found that China researchers have gained much experience during last decade, but still have room for improvement in establishing boundaries, assessing data quality, identifying data sources, and explaining limitations. The paper concludes with a discussion of directions for future LCA research in China.
Date: May 29, 2009
Creator: Lu, Hongyou; Masanet, Eric & Price, Lynn
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

3-D sedimentological and geophysical studies of clastic reservoir analogs: Facies architecture, reservoir properties, and flow behavior within delta front facies elements of the Cretaceous Wall Creek Member, Frontier Formation, Wyoming

Description: This project examined the internal architecture of delta front sandstones at two locations within the Turonian-age Wall Creek Member of the Frontier Formation, in Wyoming. The project involved traditional outcrop field work integrated with core-data, and 2D and 3D ground penetrating radar (GPR) imaging from behind the outcrops. The fluid-flow engineering work, handled through a collaborative grant given to PI Chris White at LSU, focused on effects on fluid flow of late-stage calcite cement nodules in 3D. In addition to the extensive field component, the work funded 2 PhD students (Gani and Lee) and resulted in publication of 10 technical papers, 17 abstracts, and 4 internal field guides. PI Bhattacharya also funded an additional 3 PhD students that worked on the Wall Creek sandstone funded separately through an industrial consortium, two of whom graduated in the fall 2006 ((Sadeque and Vakarelov). These additional funds provided significant leverage to expand the work to include a regional stratigraphic synthesis of the Wall Creek Member of the Frontier Formation, in addition to the reservoir-scale studies that DOE directly funded. Awards given to PI Bhattacharya included the prestigious AAPG Distinguished Lecture Award, which involved a tour of about 25 Universities and Geological Societies in the US and Canada in the fall of 2005 and Spring of 2006. Bhattacharya gave two talks, one entitled “Applying Deltaic and Shallow Marine Outcrop Analogs to the Subsurface”, which highlighted the DOE sponsored work and the other titled “Martian River Deltas and the Origin of Life”. The outcrop analog talk was given at about 1/2 of the venues visited.
Date: February 16, 2007
Creator: Bhattacharya, Janok P. & McMechan, George A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of Bypassed Oil Reserves Using Behind Casing Resistivity Measurements

Description: Tubing and rods of the S.P. Pedro-Nepple No.1 well were pulled and the well was prepared for running of Schlumberger's Cased Hole Formation Resistivity Tool (CHFR) in selected intervals. The CHFR tool was successfully run and data was captured. The CHFR formation resistivity readings were compared to original open hole resistivity measurements. Separation between the original and CHFR resistivity curves indicate both swept and un-swept sand intervals. Both watered out sand intervals and those with higher remaining oil saturation have been identified. Due to the nature of these turbidite sands being stratigraphically continuous, both the swept and unswept layers have been correlated across to one of the four nearby offset shallow wells. As a result of the cased hole logging, one well was selected for a workover to recomplete and test suspected oil saturated shallow sand intervals. Well S.P. Pedro-Nepple No.2 was plugged back with cement excluding the previously existing production interval, squeeze cemented behind casing, selectively perforated in the shallower ''Bell'' zone and placed on production to develop potential new oil reserves and increase overall well productivity. Prior workover production averaged 3.0 BOPD for the previous six-months from the original ''Meyer'' completion interval. Post workover well production was increased to 5.3 BOPD on average for the following fifteen months. In December 2005, a bridge plug was installed above the ''Bell'' zone to test the ''Foix'' zone. Another cement squeeze was performed behind casing, selectively perforated in the shallower ''Foix'' zone and placed on production. The ''Foix'' test has produced water and a trace of oil for two months.
Date: February 14, 2004
Creator: Conner, Michael G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrosion reference for geothermal downhole materials selection: Overview

Description: A consolidated reference of materials for downhole equipment used in geothermal energy exploitation is nearing completion. The reference is a summary of recent developments in the areas of tubular goods materials, highly alloyed metals, high temperature cements, high temperature elastomers, drilling and completion tools, logging tools, and downwell pumps. A brief overview is presented in this paper.
Date: October 8, 1982
Creator: Ellis, Peter F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery Act Production of Algal BioCrude Oil from Cement Plant Carbon Dioxide

Description: The consortium, led by Sunrise Ridge Algae Inc, completed financial, legal, siting, engineering and environmental permitting preparations for a proposed demonstration project that would capture stack gas from an operating cement plant and convert the carbon dioxide to beneficial use as a liquid crude petroleum substitute and a coal substitute, using algae grown in a closed system, then harvested and converted using catalyzed pyrolysis.
Date: September 30, 2010
Creator: Weber, Robert & Whitton, Norman
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterizing the nano and micro structure of concrete to improve its durability

Description: New and advanced methodologies have been developed to characterize the nano and microstructure of cement paste and concrete exposed to aggressive environments. High resolution full-field soft X-ray imaging in the water window is providing new insight on the nano scale of the cement hydration process, which leads to a nano-optimization of cement-based systems. Hard X-ray microtomography images on ice inside cement paste and cracking caused by the alkali-silica reaction (ASR) enables three-dimensional structural identification. The potential of neutron diffraction to determine reactive aggregates by measuring their residual strains and preferred orientation is studied. Results of experiments using these tools will be shown on this paper.
Date: October 22, 2008
Creator: Monteiro, P. J. M.; Kirchheim, A. P.; Chae, S.; Fischer, P.; MacDowell, A. A.; Schaible, E. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Concrete and Related Materials for Desalination Plants: Second Annual Progress Report

Description: Report investigating concrete for use in a sea water desalination plant. Concretes containing both natural and limestone aggregates were tested under the temperature, pressure, salinity, and structural stress conditions that could be expected in such a plant.
Date: June 1968
Creator: United States. Bureau of Reclamation.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

Description: The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. DOE joined the Materials Management Service (MMS)-sponsored joint industry project ''Long-Term Integrity of Deepwater Cement under Stress/Compaction Conditions.'' Results of the project contained in two progress reports are also presented in this report.
Date: January 31, 2003
Creator: Sabins, Fred
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plastic-casting intrinsic-surface unique identifier (tag)

Description: This report describes the development of an authenticated intrinsic-surf ace tagging method for unique- identification of controlled items. Although developed for control of items limited by an arms control treaty, this method has other potential applications to keep track of critical or high-value items. Each tag (unique-identifier) consists of the intrinsic, microscopic surface topography of a small designated area on a controlled item. It is implemented by making a baseline plastic casting of the designated tag area and usually placing a cover (for example, a bar-code label) over this area to protect the surface from environmental alteration. The plastic casting is returned to a laboratory and prepared for high-resolution scanning electron microscope imaging. Several images are digitized and stored for use as a standard for authentication of castings taken during future inspections. Authentication is determined by numerically comparing digital images. Commercially available hardware and software are used for this tag. Tag parameters are optimized, so unique casting images are obtained from original surfaces, and images obtained from attempted duplicate surfaces are detected. This optimization uses the modulation transfer function, a first principle of image analysis, to determine the parameters. Surface duplication experiments confirmed the optimization.
Date: April 1, 1995
Creator: Palm, R.G. & De Volpi, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radionuclide transport through engineered barrier system alteration products

Description: The primary rationale for studying the transport behavior of radionuclides through the Engineered Barrier system / Near Field Environment (EBS/NFE) is to ascertain whether the material properties of the introduced and altered host rock can significantly affect the transport of radionuclides from the waste container to the far field. The intent of this report is to present data and modeling results that can be used to assess the importance of canister corrosion products and cementitious materials to transport of radionuclides to the far field.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Viani, B.E.; Torretto, P.C. & Matzen, S.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A new and superior ultrafine cementitious grout

Description: Sealing fractures in nuclear waste repositories concerns all programs investigating deep burial as a means of disposal. Because the most likely mechanism for contaminant migration is by dissolution and movement through groundwater, sealing programs are seeking low-viscosity sealants that are chemically, mineralogically, and physically compatible with the host rock. This paper presents the results of collaborative work directed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and supported by Whiteshell Laboratories, operated by Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd. The work was undertaken in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), an underground nuclear waste repository located in a salt formation east of Carlsbad, NM. This effort addresses the technology associated with long-term isolation of nuclear waste in a natural salt medium. The work presented is part of the WIPP plugging and sealing program, specifically the development and optimization of an ultrafine cementitious grout that can be injected to lower excessive, strain-induced hydraulic conductivity in the fractured rock termed the Disturbed Rock Zone (DRZ) surrounding underground excavations. Innovative equipment and procedures employed in the laboratory produced a usable cement-based grout; 90% of the particles were smaller than 8 microns and the average particle size was 4 microns. The process involved simultaneous wet pulverization and mixing. The grout was used for a successful in situ test underground at the WIPP. Injection of grout sealed microfractures as small as 6 microns (and in one rare instance, 3 microns) and lowered the gas transmissivity of the DRZ by up to three orders of magnitude. Following the WIPP test, additional work produced an improved version of the grout containing particles 90% smaller than 5 microns and averaging 2 microns. This grout will be produced in dry form, ready for the mixer.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Ahrens, E.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal denitration and mineralization of waste constituents

Description: In order to produce a quality grout from LLW using hydraulic cements, proper conditioning of the waste is essential for complete cement curing. Several technologies were investigated as options for conditions. Since the LLW is dilute, removal of all, or most, of the water will significantly reduce the final waste volume. Neutralization of the LLW is also desirable since acidic liquids to not allow cement to cure properly. The nitrate compounds are very soluble and easily leached from solid waste forms; therefore, denitration is desirable. Thermal and chemical denitration technologies have the advantages of water removal, neutralization, and denitration. The inclusion of additives during thermal treatment were investigated as a method of forming insoluable waste conditions.
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Nenni, J.A. & Boardman, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bleed water testing program for controlled low strength material

Description: Bleed water measurements for two Controlled Low Strength Material (CLSM) mixes were conducted to provide engineering data for the Tank 20F closure activities. CLSM Mix 1 contained 150 pounds of cement per cubic yard whereas CLSM Mix 2 contained 50 pounds per cub yard. SRS currently used CLSM Mix 2 for various applications. Bleed water percentages and generation rates were measured along with flow and compressive strength. This information will be used to select a mix design for the Tank 20F closure activities and to establish the engineering requirements, such as, lift height, time required between lifts and quantity of bleed water to be removed from the tank during the placement activities. Mix 1 is recommended for placement within Tank 20F because it has better flow characteristics, less segregation, lower percentage of bleed water and slightly higher strength. Optimization of Mix 1 was beyond the scope of this study. However, further testing of thickening additives, such as clays (bentonite), sodium silicate or fine silicas maybe useful for decreasing or eliminating bleed water.
Date: November 12, 1996
Creator: Langton, C.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quality assurance plan for placement of cold-cap grout, demonstration vault, Hanford Grout Vault Program. Final report

Description: During FY 91, the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) developed a grout to be used as a cold cap, a nonradioactive layer, between the solidified waste and the cover blocks of a demonstration waste disposal vault at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Facility. This document recommends requirements for a quality assurance (QA) plan for field mixing and placing of the cold-cap grout during final closure of the demonstration vault. Preplacement activities emphasize selection and testing of materials that will match the performance of materials used in the WES grout. Materials sources and applicable American Society of Testing and Materials, American Concrete Institute, and American Petroleum Institute specifications and requirements are provided. Archiving of physical samples of materials is essential, in addition to careful maintenance of test reports and laboratory data. Full-scale field trial mixing and a detailed preconstruction conference are recommended. Placement activities focus on production and placement of a grout that remains sufficiently constant throughout all batches and meets performance requirements. QA activities must be coordinated between the batch plant and delivery site. Recommended sampling during placement includes cylinders cast for subsequent tests of compressive strength and for nondestructive evaluation and prisms cast for monitoring volume stability. A minimum of two lifts is recommended. Postplacement activities include long-term monitoring of the properties of grout specimens cast during placement. Minimum testing of cylinders includes pulse velocity, fundamental frequency, and unconfined compressive strength. Monitoring characteristics of the microstructure also are recommended. The QA plan should designate an organization to have responsibility for maintaining complete records, reports, and archived samples, including details of deviations from plans written before field placement.
Date: August 1, 1992
Creator: Harrington, P.T.; Wakeley, L.D.; Ernzen, J.J. & Walley, D.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement of Thermal Properties of Saltstone

Description: Radioactive liquid effluent from the In Tank Precipitation Process is mixed with Portland cement, flyash and furnace alag to form Saltstone. The Saltstone is poured into vaults at Z Area for long term disposal. A transient heat transfer model of the Saltstone pouring process was previously written to determine whether the Saltstone temperature would exceed the Technical Specification Limit of 95 degrees C. The present work was performed to provide Saltstone density, heat capacity, heat of hydration and thermal conductivity for inclusion in the model.
Date: May 1998
Creator: Steimke, J. L. & Fowley, M. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department