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Causes of Variation in Chemical Analyses and Physical Tests of Portland Cement

Description: Report discussing variations in comparative tests of portland cements that could lead to the rejection of a material fully conforming to specification requirements, or the acceptance of a material with undesirable chemical or physical properties. Many of the causes for variation in chemical analyses and physical test results are listed in this discussion, and remedies for some of the more frequently encountered deficiencies in apparatus and methods are suggested.
Date: April 27, 1961
Creator: Bean, B. Leonard & Dise, John R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CSER 96-013: Cementation Process, glovebox HA-20MB at PFP

Description: This evaluation provides criticality safety controls for the cementation processing in Glovebox HA-2OMB at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Slag and crucible residues from Pu button making will be blended with Portland cement in 5k-in. diam. x 7-in. tall cans, for eventual disposition in special DOT 17C drums. A maximum of 180 g Pu is allowed per liquid-bearing container (mixing bowl, filter funnel, or cement can). In this SD revision, three separate areas with 500 g Pu limits each are established; the airlock cell for input S&C cans, the reaction- and mixing-process area, and a cemented-can storage area. Number and spacing of containers within an area is not restricted, for areas spaced 6 inches apart. Acid addition in the reaction stage is allowed to the extent that plutonium dissolution will not occur.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Hess, A.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

Description: The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra- lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.
Date: October 31, 2003
Creator: Sabins, Fred
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DEVELOPMENT OF BYPASSED OIL RESERVES USING BEHIND CASING RESISTIVITY MEASUREMENTS

Description: Tubing and rods of the S.P. Pedro-Nepple No.1 well were pulled and the well was prepared for running of Schlumberger's Cased Hole Formation Resistivity Tool (CHFR) in selected intervals. The CHFR tool was successfully run and data was captured. The CHFR formation resistivity readings were compared to original open hole resistivity measurements. Separation between the original and CHFR resistivity curves indicate both swept and un-swept sand intervals. Both watered out sand intervals and those with higher remaining oil saturation have been identified. Due to the nature of these turbidite sands being stratigraphically continuous, both the swept and unswept layers have been correlated across to one of the four nearby offset shallow wells. As a result of the cased hole logging, one well was selected for a workover to recomplete high oil saturated shallow sand intervals. During the second report period, well S.P. Pedro-Nepple No.2 was plugged back with cement excluding the previously existing production interval, squeeze cemented behind casing, selectively perforated in the shallower ''Bell'' zone and placed on production to develop potential new oil reserves and increase overall well productivity. Prior workover production averaged 3.0 BOPD for the previous six-months. Post workover well production was marginally increased to 3.7 BOPD on average for the following six months.
Date: February 7, 2005
Creator: Conner, Michael G. & Blesener, Jeffrey A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Arctic Energy Technology Development Laboratory (Part 3)

Description: Various laboratory tests were carried at the R & D facility of BJ Services in Tomball, TX with BJ Services staff to predict and evaluate the performance of the Ceramicrete slurry for its effective use in permafrost cementing operations. Although other standards such as those of the American Standard for Testing Materials (ASTM) and Construction Specification Institute (CSI) exist, all these tests were standardized by the API. A summary of the tests traditionally used in the cement slurry design as well as the API tests reference document are provided in Table 7. All of these tests were performed within the scope of this research to evaluate properties of the Ceramicrete.
Date: December 31, 2008
Creator: 960443, See OSTI ID Number
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DEVELOPMENT OF BYPASSED OIL RESERVES USING BEHIND CASING RESISTIVITY MEASUREMENTS

Description: Tubing and rods of the S.P. Pedro-Nepple No.1 well were pulled and the well was prepared for running of Schlumberger's Cased Hole Formation Resistivity Tool (CHFR) in selected intervals. The CHFR tool was successfully run and data was captured. The CHFR formation resistivity readings were compared to original open hole resistivity measurements. Separation between the original and CHFR resistivity curves indicate both swept and un-swept sand intervals. Both watered out sand intervals and those with higher remaining oil saturation have been identified. Due to the nature of these turbidite sands being stratigraphically continuous, both the swept and unswept layers have been correlated across to one of the four nearby offset shallow wells. As a result of the cased hole logging, one well was selected for a workover to recomplete and test suspected oil saturated shallow sand intervals. Well S.P. Pedro-Nepple No.2 was plugged back with cement excluding the previously existing production interval, squeeze cemented behind casing, selectively perforated in the shallower ''Bell'' zone and placed on production to develop potential new oil reserves and increase overall well productivity. Prior workover production averaged 3.0 BOPD for the previous six-months from the original ''Meyer'' completion interval. Post workover well production was increased to 5.3 BOPD on average for the following fifteen months. In December 2005, a bridge plug was installed above the ''Bell'' zone to test the ''Foix'' zone. Another cement squeeze was performed behind casing, selectively perforated in the shallower ''Foix'' zone and placed on production. The ''Foix'' test has produced water and a trace of oil for two months.
Date: April 2, 2006
Creator: Conner, Michael G. & Blesener, Jeffrey A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

Description: The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. DOE joined the Materials Management Service (MMS)-sponsored joint industry project ''Long-Term Integrity of Deepwater Cement under Stress/Compaction Conditions.'' Results of the project contained in two progress reports are also presented in this report.
Date: January 31, 2003
Creator: Sabins, Fred
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plastic-casting intrinsic-surface unique identifier (tag)

Description: This report describes the development of an authenticated intrinsic-surf ace tagging method for unique- identification of controlled items. Although developed for control of items limited by an arms control treaty, this method has other potential applications to keep track of critical or high-value items. Each tag (unique-identifier) consists of the intrinsic, microscopic surface topography of a small designated area on a controlled item. It is implemented by making a baseline plastic casting of the designated tag area and usually placing a cover (for example, a bar-code label) over this area to protect the surface from environmental alteration. The plastic casting is returned to a laboratory and prepared for high-resolution scanning electron microscope imaging. Several images are digitized and stored for use as a standard for authentication of castings taken during future inspections. Authentication is determined by numerically comparing digital images. Commercially available hardware and software are used for this tag. Tag parameters are optimized, so unique casting images are obtained from original surfaces, and images obtained from attempted duplicate surfaces are detected. This optimization uses the modulation transfer function, a first principle of image analysis, to determine the parameters. Surface duplication experiments confirmed the optimization.
Date: April 1, 1995
Creator: Palm, R.G. & De Volpi, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radionuclide transport through engineered barrier system alteration products

Description: The primary rationale for studying the transport behavior of radionuclides through the Engineered Barrier system / Near Field Environment (EBS/NFE) is to ascertain whether the material properties of the introduced and altered host rock can significantly affect the transport of radionuclides from the waste container to the far field. The intent of this report is to present data and modeling results that can be used to assess the importance of canister corrosion products and cementitious materials to transport of radionuclides to the far field.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Viani, B.E.; Torretto, P.C. & Matzen, S.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A new and superior ultrafine cementitious grout

Description: Sealing fractures in nuclear waste repositories concerns all programs investigating deep burial as a means of disposal. Because the most likely mechanism for contaminant migration is by dissolution and movement through groundwater, sealing programs are seeking low-viscosity sealants that are chemically, mineralogically, and physically compatible with the host rock. This paper presents the results of collaborative work directed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and supported by Whiteshell Laboratories, operated by Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd. The work was undertaken in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), an underground nuclear waste repository located in a salt formation east of Carlsbad, NM. This effort addresses the technology associated with long-term isolation of nuclear waste in a natural salt medium. The work presented is part of the WIPP plugging and sealing program, specifically the development and optimization of an ultrafine cementitious grout that can be injected to lower excessive, strain-induced hydraulic conductivity in the fractured rock termed the Disturbed Rock Zone (DRZ) surrounding underground excavations. Innovative equipment and procedures employed in the laboratory produced a usable cement-based grout; 90% of the particles were smaller than 8 microns and the average particle size was 4 microns. The process involved simultaneous wet pulverization and mixing. The grout was used for a successful in situ test underground at the WIPP. Injection of grout sealed microfractures as small as 6 microns (and in one rare instance, 3 microns) and lowered the gas transmissivity of the DRZ by up to three orders of magnitude. Following the WIPP test, additional work produced an improved version of the grout containing particles 90% smaller than 5 microns and averaging 2 microns. This grout will be produced in dry form, ready for the mixer.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Ahrens, E.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal denitration and mineralization of waste constituents

Description: In order to produce a quality grout from LLW using hydraulic cements, proper conditioning of the waste is essential for complete cement curing. Several technologies were investigated as options for conditions. Since the LLW is dilute, removal of all, or most, of the water will significantly reduce the final waste volume. Neutralization of the LLW is also desirable since acidic liquids to not allow cement to cure properly. The nitrate compounds are very soluble and easily leached from solid waste forms; therefore, denitration is desirable. Thermal and chemical denitration technologies have the advantages of water removal, neutralization, and denitration. The inclusion of additives during thermal treatment were investigated as a method of forming insoluable waste conditions.
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Nenni, J.A. & Boardman, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bleed water testing program for controlled low strength material

Description: Bleed water measurements for two Controlled Low Strength Material (CLSM) mixes were conducted to provide engineering data for the Tank 20F closure activities. CLSM Mix 1 contained 150 pounds of cement per cubic yard whereas CLSM Mix 2 contained 50 pounds per cub yard. SRS currently used CLSM Mix 2 for various applications. Bleed water percentages and generation rates were measured along with flow and compressive strength. This information will be used to select a mix design for the Tank 20F closure activities and to establish the engineering requirements, such as, lift height, time required between lifts and quantity of bleed water to be removed from the tank during the placement activities. Mix 1 is recommended for placement within Tank 20F because it has better flow characteristics, less segregation, lower percentage of bleed water and slightly higher strength. Optimization of Mix 1 was beyond the scope of this study. However, further testing of thickening additives, such as clays (bentonite), sodium silicate or fine silicas maybe useful for decreasing or eliminating bleed water.
Date: November 12, 1996
Creator: Langton, C.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quality assurance plan for placement of cold-cap grout, demonstration vault, Hanford Grout Vault Program. Final report

Description: During FY 91, the U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) developed a grout to be used as a cold cap, a nonradioactive layer, between the solidified waste and the cover blocks of a demonstration waste disposal vault at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Facility. This document recommends requirements for a quality assurance (QA) plan for field mixing and placing of the cold-cap grout during final closure of the demonstration vault. Preplacement activities emphasize selection and testing of materials that will match the performance of materials used in the WES grout. Materials sources and applicable American Society of Testing and Materials, American Concrete Institute, and American Petroleum Institute specifications and requirements are provided. Archiving of physical samples of materials is essential, in addition to careful maintenance of test reports and laboratory data. Full-scale field trial mixing and a detailed preconstruction conference are recommended. Placement activities focus on production and placement of a grout that remains sufficiently constant throughout all batches and meets performance requirements. QA activities must be coordinated between the batch plant and delivery site. Recommended sampling during placement includes cylinders cast for subsequent tests of compressive strength and for nondestructive evaluation and prisms cast for monitoring volume stability. A minimum of two lifts is recommended. Postplacement activities include long-term monitoring of the properties of grout specimens cast during placement. Minimum testing of cylinders includes pulse velocity, fundamental frequency, and unconfined compressive strength. Monitoring characteristics of the microstructure also are recommended. The QA plan should designate an organization to have responsibility for maintaining complete records, reports, and archived samples, including details of deviations from plans written before field placement.
Date: August 1, 1992
Creator: Harrington, P.T.; Wakeley, L.D.; Ernzen, J.J. & Walley, D.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement of Thermal Properties of Saltstone

Description: Radioactive liquid effluent from the In Tank Precipitation Process is mixed with Portland cement, flyash and furnace alag to form Saltstone. The Saltstone is poured into vaults at Z Area for long term disposal. A transient heat transfer model of the Saltstone pouring process was previously written to determine whether the Saltstone temperature would exceed the Technical Specification Limit of 95 degrees C. The present work was performed to provide Saltstone density, heat capacity, heat of hydration and thermal conductivity for inclusion in the model.
Date: May 1998
Creator: Steimke, J. L. & Fowley, M. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sulfur polymer cement for macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris

Description: In FY 1997, the US DOE Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) sponsored a demonstration of the macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris using sulfur polymer cement (SPC). Two mixed wastes were tested--a D006 waste comprised of sheets of cadmium and a D008/D009 waste comprised of lead pipes and joints contaminated with mercury. The demonstration was successful in rendering these wastes compliant with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR), thereby eliminating one Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) waste stream from the national inventory.
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Mattus, C.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

Description: The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter.
Date: April 15, 2001
Creator: Sabins, Fred
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

OPPORTUNITIES TO MARKET U.S. TECHNOLOGIES THROUGHOUT THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE

Description: This project involves an open-ended, continuous process of information gathering with respect to Latin American and Caribbean environmental issues. This entails the development of contacts with individuals and institutions conducting research and work on issues of sustainability and environmental technology in the Americas. As part of this phase, a database containing information on firms, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), governmental institutions, and other participants in Latin America's environmental sector was developed and is continually being updated. In addition, FIU-HCET's efforts were geared toward determining environmental technological needs in different parts of the region and identifying the most significant and lucrative markets. The project requires that FIU-HCET continually cement those contacts already established, continue updating the database to be made available to external users, and identify U.S. companies with the necessary expertise to participate in the Latin American and Caribbean markets. To aid in this endeavor, comprehensive, country-specific studies of the market for environmental goods and services are drafted and published by FIU-HCET. FIU-HCET, with sponsorship from OST, will make new, innovative, and more cost-effective technologies available for transfer throughout the Western Hemisphere. Environmental/energy technology development projects encompass the range of problems experienced by LACN. This includes mixed waste characterization and treatment, soils and groundwater remediation. In addition, future activities will include the issues of energy, climate change, and fossil fuels.
Date: January 1, 1999
Creator: M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

Description: The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweigh cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary surface pipe and intermediate casing cementing conditions historically encountered in the US and establishment of average design conditions for ULHS cements. Russian literature concerning development and use of ultra-lightweight cements employing either nitrogen or ULHS was reviewed, and a summary is presented. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was conducted to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS. This protocol is presented and discussed. finally, results of initial testing of ULHS cements is presented along with analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project.
Date: January 15, 2001
Creator: Sabins, Fred
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Enhancement of cemented waste forms by supercritical CO{sub 2} carbonation of standard portland cements

Description: We are conducting experiments on an innovative transformation concept, using a traditional immobilization technique, that may significantly reduce the volume of hazardous or radioactive waste requiring transport and long-term storage. The standard practice for the stabilization of radioactive salts and residues is to mix them with cements, which may include additives to enhance immobilization. Many of these wastes do not qualify for underground disposition, however, because they do not meet disposal requirements for free liquids, decay heat, head-space gas analysis, and/or leachability. The treatment method alters the bulk properties of a cemented waste form by greatly accelerating the natural cement-aging reactions, producing a chemically stable form having reduced free liquids, as well as reduced porosity, permeability and pH. These structural and chemical changes should allow for greater actinide loading, as well as the reduced mobility of the anions, cations, and radionuclides in aboveground and underground repositories. Simultaneously, the treatment process removes a majority of the hydrogenous material from the cement. The treatment method allows for on-line process monitoring of leachates and can be transported into the field. We will describe the general features of supercritical fluids, as well as the application of these fluids to the treatment of solid and semi-solid waste forms. some of the issues concerning the economic feasibility of industrial scale-up will be addressed, with particular attention to the engineering requirements for the establishment of on-site processing facilities. Finally, the initial results of physical property measurements made on portland cements before and after supercritical fluid processing will be presented.
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Rubin, J.B.; Carey, J. & Taylor, C.M.V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effect of radiation on topopah spring tuff mechanical properties

Description: The effect of radiation on the mechanical properties of Topopah Spring tuff was investigated by performing uniaxial compressive tests on irradiated and control samples of the tuff from the potential repository horizon at Yucca Mountain. Test results are presented, including stress-strain curves and peak strength and Young`s modulus values. These results show that for homogeneous uncracked samples of Topopah Spring tuff, exposure to gamma radiation had no discernible effect on the unconfined partially healed subvertical caracks indicate that exposure may reduce the strength and Young`s modulus significantly. This is attributed to weakening of the cementing materials in the cracks and fractures of the samples that were irradiated. These results are preliminary, and additional studies are warranted to evaluate whether radiation weakens cementing materials in welded tuff.
Date: November 1, 1996
Creator: Berge, P.A. & Blair, S.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Protective coatings for concrete

Description: The new two-layer protective coating developed for monuments constructed of limestone or marble was applied to highway cement and to tobermorite, a component of cement, and tested in batch dissolution tests. The goal was to determine the suitability of the protective coating in retarding the weathering rate of concrete construction. The two-layer coating consists of an inner layer of aminoethylaminopropylsilane (AEAPS) applied as a 25% solution in methanol and an outer layer of A2** sol-gel. In previous work, this product when applied to calcite powders, had resulted in a lowering of the rate of dissolution by a factor of ten and was shown through molecular modeling to bind strongly to the calcite surface, but not too strongly so as to accelerate dissolution. Batch dissolution tests at 22 C of coated and uncoated tobermorite (1.1 nm phase) and powdered cement from Gibson Blvd. in Albuquerque indicated that the coating exhibits some protective behavior, at least on short time scales. However, the data suggest that the outer layer of sol-gel dissolves in the high-pH environment of the closed system of cement plus water. Calculated binding configuration and energy of AEAPS to the tobermorite surface suggests that AEAPS is well-suited as the inner layer binder for protecting tobermorite.
Date: May 1, 2000
Creator: NAGY, KATHRYN L.; CYGAN, RANDALL T.; BRINKER, C. JEFFREY & SELLINGER, ALAN
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Demonstration of Mixed Waste Debris Macroencapsulation Using Sulfur Polymer Cement

Description: This report covers work performed during FY 1997 as part of the Evaluation of Sulfur Polymer Cement Fast-Track System Project. The project is in support of the ``Mercury Working Group/Mercury Treatment Demonstrations - Oak Ridge`` and is described in technical task plan (TTP) OR-16MW-61. Macroencapsulation is the treatment technology required for debris by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Based upon the results of previous work performed at Oak Ridge, the concept of using sulfur polymer cement (SPC) for this purpose was submitted to the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA). Because of the promising properties of the material, the MWFA accepted this Quick Win project, which was to demonstrate the feasibility of macroencapsulation of actual mixed waste debris stored on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The waste acceptance criteria from Envirocare, Utah, were chosen as a standard for the determination of the final waste form produced. During this demonstration, it was shown that SPC was a good candidate for macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris, especially when the debris pieces were dry. The matrix was found to be quite easy to use and, once the optimum operating conditions were identified, very straightforward to replicate for batch treatment. The demonstration was able to render LDR compliant more than 400 kg of mixed wastes stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
Date: July 1, 1998
Creator: Mattus, C.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nitrate to Ammonia Ceramic (NAC) bench scale stabilization study

Description: Department of Energy (DOE) sites such as the Hanford site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Savannah River site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have large quantities of sodium-nitrate based liquid wastes. At INEL alone there are 800,000 gallons. The largest quantity of these wastes is the 149 single shell tanks (SSTs) tanks at Hanford which can hold 1 million gallons each. The nitrate to ammonia ceramic (NAC) process has been developed to remove a majority of the nitrate content from the wastes.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Caime, W.J. & Hoeffner, S.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department