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Canning Tomatoes at Home and in Club Work

Description: "The purpose of this bulletin is to present practical methods of using canning outfits at home and out of doors in the canning clubs organized at school centers. It does not discuss the commercial or factory methods of canning, but is intended primarily to enable the girls on the farms to save many vegetables which now go to waste. It will be of great value in the demonstration club work." -- p. 2. Topics discussed include methods of canning, recipes for canned tomatoes, and canning terminology.
Date: 1913
Creator: Breazeale, J. F. (James Frank), 1874-1950 & Benson, O. H. (Oscar Herman), 1875-1951
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Canning Peaches on the Farm

Description: Report explaining how to successfully can peaches, including fundamental principles of canning, equipment necessary for canning, and marketing the canned peaches.
Date: 1910
Creator: Gould, H. P. & Fletcher, W. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Bismuth Casting and Canning : (Information Report)

Description: Introduction: The experimental work at Mound Laboratory on bismuth casting and the sealing of aluminum irradiation containers is an outgrowth of the bismuth recovery project. Since the recovered bismuth contains residual activity it is necessary that the bismuth be processed to the point that no contamination will result from shipment or any subsequent operations required to prepare the bismuth for irradiation. In order to satisfy these requirements the work here has consisted of investigating methods of preparing the bismuth slugs in the shapes required and of mechanically sealing the aluminum container.
Date: June 16, 1952
Creator: Engle, Paul.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Home canning of fruits and vegetables.

Description: A guide to home canning. Includes instructions for canning a variety of fruits and fruit juices, vegetables and soups, and meats and meat dishes.
Date: June 1923
Creator: United States. Dept. of Agriculture. States Relations Service.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Home Canning by the One-Period Cold-Pack Method: Taught to Canning Club Members in the Northern and Western States

Description: "Without previous experience, and with no other equipment than that to be found in almost every home, anyone, adult or child, should be able to can food satisfactorily by the method described in this bulletin. By this method various vegetables, soups, meat, fish, and practically any other foods or combination of foods can be canned, as well as fruits and tomatoes, the products most commonly canned. The few simple, general rules necessary for successful canning, by the one-period, cold-pack method, and specific directions covering practically all foods that may be canned, are set out in the following pages." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Benson, O. H. (Oscar Herman), 1875-1951
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Canning goods in the root cellar]

Description: Photograph of Viola Treece placing freshly canned goods in the root cellar. in the image, Treece is placing a jar on the shelf while hold two more in her arm. Large amounts of jars filled with a variety of goods line the shelves and floor of the cellar.
Date: 194u
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Conceptual Design

Description: 'The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization can loading conceptual design and includes a process block diagram, process description, preliminary equipment specifications, and several can loading issues. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas.'
Date: May 13, 1999
Creator: Kriikku, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: "This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Date: 1919
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin applies to that part of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts in the irrigated regions of the West; it aims to aid those familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those which apply in the growing of other crops. Details of operation must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid regions frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those localities who could install an irrigation system at small expense. Detailed information is also given as to soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, and shipping. Methods of using surplus strawberries for preserves and jams, for canning, and for flavoring for various purposes are given." -- p. 3
Date: 1928
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Since strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove suggestive to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Date: 1933
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "This bulletin applies both to the western portions of the United States in which ordinary farm crops are grown largely under irrigation and to western Oregon and Washington where irrigation is not essential for strawberry production but may be profitable. It describes methods practiced in the more important commercial strawberry-growing districts of the West; it aims to aid those persons familiar only with local and perhaps unsatisfactory methods, as well as inexperienced prospective growers. The fundamental principles of the irrigation of strawberries are substantially the same as those of irrigating other crops. Details must necessarily be governed largely by the character of the crop grown. Because strawberries in the humid areas frequently suffer from drought, which causes heavy losses in the developing fruit, the information may prove helpful to many growers in those areas who could install irrigation systems at small expense. This bulletin gives information on soils and their preparation, different training systems, propagation, planting, culture, the leading varieties, harvesting, shipping, and utilization." -- p. ii
Date: 1941
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889- & Waldo, George F. (George Fordyce), b. 1898
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strawberry Culture: Western United States

Description: Revised edition. "Strawberries can be grown in those parts of the western Untied States in which ordinary farm crops are irrigated as well as in western Oregon and Washington, where irrigation is not essential but may be profitable. The principles of irrigating strawberries are essentially the same as those for other crops. Because strawberries are sensitive to the alkali salts that irrigation brings to the surface, such salts must be washed out or skimmed off. The strawberry grower, after choosing a suitable site and preparing the soil carefully, should select varieties adapted to his district and needs. He should use plants that are disease-free. In California, southern Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas the plants should have undergone a rest period. Usually the growers plant during the period of greatest rainfall. By using the recommended systems of training and care before, during, and after setting of the plants and the suggested methods of decreasing diseases and insect pests, he should obtain better yields. A grower can furnish consumers a better product by using good methods of harvesting and shipment. He can prolong the fresh-fruit season only a little by the use of cold storage, but he can extend his market by growing varieties suitable for preserving, canning, and freezing." -- p. ii
Date: 1948
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889- & Waldo, George F. (George Fordyce), b. 1898
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CENTRIFUGE FOR RADIOCHEMICAL PROCESSING

Description: The feasibility of designing and developlng a canned centrifuge capable of operating for extended periods in a highly radioactive area was investigated. A preliminary design for the entire unit is outlined. It is concluded that such apparatus can be designed and built. Cost estimates are given, and recommended features for incorporation in the centrifuge are listed. (J.R.S.)
Date: September 23, 1955
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Family in root cellar]

Description: Photograph of a family of five in a root cellar. In the image, the root cellar is filled with shelves of canned jars, a table in the middle of the room is covered with jars as well.
Date: 194u
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP): Status and Issues

Description: The Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-246, 2008 farm bill) created the Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP). This report discusses the two main purposes of BCAP, which are (1) to support the establishment and production of eligible crops for conversion to bioenergy in selected areas, and (2) to assist agricultural and forest land owners and operators with collection, harvest, storage, and transportation of eligible material for use in a biomass conversion facility.
Date: April 19, 2011
Creator: Stubbs, Megan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Home Canning of Fruits and Vegetables As Taught to Canning Club Members in the Southern States

Description: "This bulletin will deal wholly with methods for canning, preserving, and jelly making. The directions given are chiefly for those products which seem most worth preserving in these ways, and the methods are those which seem best suited to the products." -- p. 3. Topics discussed including canning in glass, canning in tin, jams, fruit butters, marmalades, and jellies. Recipes included.
Date: 1917
Creator: Creswell, Mary E. (Mary Ethel), b. 1878 & Powell, Ola, b. 1889
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preservation of Vegetables by Fermentation and Salting

Description: "Among the practical methods of conserving surplus food, especially worthy of consideration at this time, are those based on preservation by fermentation and salting or brining.... The object of this bulletin is to describe and explain methods of preservation [of vegetables] by fermenting and salting, to indicate the purposes to which they are especially applicable, and to tell how the preserved products can best be prepared for table use. The methods are not given with the view that they will be substituted for canning or drying, but simply for the purpose of making housekeepers more familiar with additional methods of preserving foods which they may use if they so desire." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Round, L. A. (Lester Angell) & Lang, H. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Muscadine Grape Paste

Description: "Muscadine grape paste is an economical, appetizing, and nutritious sugar-saving substitute for candy and other confections. It is excellent in combination with cheese, and especially with cottage cheese, as a substitute for the salad course or for a dessert. It may be made from the fresh fruit or preferably from the pulp of pomace left from grape juice and jelly making. It may be made with grape sirup or corn sirup instead of sugar. The pulp may be canned and the paste made at any convenient time or when desired for use. The making of muscadine grape paste is recommended for home use, but it may be made profitably for market where grapes are abundant. This bulletin gives directions for securing suitable fruit, the extraction of the pulp, and the sweetening, cooking, drying, and storing of the product, as well as the making of various combinations, fancy pastes, and pastes from other fruits." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Dearing, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department