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Optical Calcite Deposits of the Republic of Mexico

Description: From abstract: Many small deposits of optical calcite (Iceland spar) were discovered in the States of Chihuahua, Durango, Sonora, and Sinaloa from early in 1942 to late in 1944. Exploration that began in Sonora led to the discovery of commercial deposits in the eastern part of that State, and subsequently other deposits were found and mined in southwestern and northeastern Chihuahua and in western and central Durango. The largest deposits can be reached by foot or by horse in from 1 to 3 hours from the nearest truck roads, but some of the small deposits are 1 to 3 days by horse from the nearest roads.
Date: 1948
Creator: Fries, Carl, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of near field rock treatment during constructions (LADSfeature #22)

Description: The purpose of this report is to evaluate the effect of near-field rock treatment by injection of reactive material (calcite) above the drift for the purpose of decreasing postclosure drift seepage. The method used for the calculation was a coupled reaction-transport numerical model for gas-water-rock interaction. This includes the mass conservation of heat, liquid and gas for thermohydrological calculations, of aqueous and gaseous species for advective and diffusive transport, and the kinetics of mineral-water reactions.
Date: November 24, 1998
Creator: Sonnenthal, Eric & Spycher, Nicolas
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The use of synthetic hydrocalcite as a chloride-ion getter for a barrier aluminum anodization process

Description: Chloride ion contamination at parts per billion concentrations plaques electrochemists studying barrier anodic aluminum oxide film growth and anodic aluminum oxide capacitor manufacturers. Chloride ion contamination slows film growth and reduces film quality. We have demonstrated that synthetic hydrocalcite substantially reduces the detrimental effects of chloride ion contamination in an aqueous electrolyte commonly used to grow barrier anodic aluminum oxide. We have determined that problems arise if precautions are not taken when using synthetic hydrocalcite as a chloride-ion getter in an aqueous electrolyte. Synthetic hydrocalcite is somewhat hydrophobic. If this powder is added directly to an aqueous electrolyte, some powder disperses; some floats to the top of the bath and forms scum that locally impedes anodic film formation. Commercially available powder contains a wide range of particle sizes including submicrometer-sized particles that can escape through filters into the electrolyte and cause processing problems. These problems can be over come if (1) the getter is placed in filter bags, (2) a piece of filter paper is used to skim trace amounts of getter floating on the top of the bath, (3) dummy runs are performed to scavenge chloride-ion loaded getter micelles dispersed in the bath, and (4) substrates are rinsed with a strong stream of deionized water to remove trace amounts of powder after anodization.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Panitz, J.K.G. & Sharp, D.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Upscaling of Bio-mediated Soil Improvement

Description: As demand for soil improvement continues to increase, new, sustainable, and innocuous methods are needed to alter the mechanical properties of soils. Recent research has demonstrated the potential of bio-mediated soil improvement for geotechnical applications (DeJong et al. 2006, Whiffin et al. 2007). Upscaling the bio-mediated treatment process for in situ implementation presents a number of challenges to be addressed, including soil and pore fluid interactions, bioaugmentation versus biostimulation of microbial communities, controlled distribution of mediated calcite precipitation, and permanence of the cementation. Current studies are utilizing large-scale laboratory experiments, non-destructive geophysical measurements, and modeling, to develop an optimized and predictable bio-mediated treatment method.
Date: October 1, 2009
Creator: DeJong, J. T.; Martinez, B. C.; Mortensen, B. M.; Nelson, D. C.; Waller, J. T.; Weil, M. H. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final report for DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64404 - Field Investigations of Microbially Facilitated Calcite Precipitation for Immobilization of Strontium-90 and Other Trace Metals in the Subsurface

Description: Subsurface radionuclide and metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE’s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide 90Sr, is co-precipitation in calcite. We have previously found that that nutrient addition can stimulate microbial ureolytic activity that this activity accelerates calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of Sr, and that higher calcite precipitation rates can result in increased Sr partitioning. We have conducted integrated field, laboratory, and computational research to evaluate the relationships between ureolysis and calcite precipitation rates and trace metal partitioning under environmentally relevant conditions, and investigated the coupling between flow/flux manipulations and precipitate distribution. A field experimental campaign conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site located at Rifle, CO was based on a continuous recirculation design; water extracted from a down-gradient well was amended with urea and molasses (a carbon and electron donor) and re-injected into an up-gradient well. The goal of the recirculation design and simultaneous injection of urea and molasses was to uniformly accelerate the hydrolysis of urea and calcite precipitation over the entire inter-wellbore zone. The urea-molasses recirculation phase lasted, with brief interruptions for geophysical surveys, for 12 days followed by long-term monitoring which continued for 13 months. Following the recirculation phase we found persistent increases in urease activity (as determined from 14C labeled laboratory urea hydrolysis rates) in the upper portion of the inter-wellbore zone. We also observed an initial increase (approximately 2 weeks) in urea concentration associated with injection activities followed by decreasing urea concentration and associated increases in ammonium and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) following the termination of injection. Based on the loss of urea and the appearance of ammonium, a first order rate constant for urea hydrolysis of 0.18 day-1 rate with an associate ...
Date: October 12, 2012
Creator: Smith, Robert W.; Fujita, Yoshiko; Ginn, Timothy R. & Hubbard, Susan S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of the Potential for 90Sr Immobilization in INTEC Perched Water via Microbially Facilitated Calcite Precipitation

Description: The goal of this work is to evaluate the applicability of a biogeochemical sequestration approach for remediation of 90Sr contamination in perched water zones underlying the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). The approach is based on the accelerated co-precipitation of the contaminant in calcite, where the acceleration is catalyzed by the microbial urea hydrolysis. We have previously demonstrated the potential for this remediation mechanism to immobilize strontium. Urea hydrolysis promotes calcite precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing groundwater pH and alkalinity. Ureolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced by many environmental microorganisms. In the Snake River Plain Aquifer, which is saturated with respect to calcite, any co-precipitated 90Sr should be effectively sequestered over the long-term, even after return to pre-manipulation conditions. Another advantage of the ureolysis approach is that the NH4+ ions produced by the reaction can exchange with cations sorbed to subsurface minerals, thereby enhancing the availability of the radionuclides for re-capture via a more stable mechanism (co-precipitation rather than adsorption).
Date: October 1, 2006
Creator: Fujita, Yoshiko; Wright, Karen E. & Smith, William A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calcite Precipitation and Trace Metal Partitioning in Groundwater and the Vadose Zone: Remediation of Strontium-90 and Other Divalent Metals and Radionuclides in Arid Western Environments

Description: In situ remediation is an emerging technology that will play an important role in DOE's environmental restoration program, and is an area where enhancement in fundamental understanding will lead to significantly improved cleanup tools. In situ remediation technologies have inherent advantages because they do not require the costly removal, transport, and disposal of contamination. In addition, these technologies minimize worker exposure because contaminated materials are not brought to the surface. Finally, these technologies will minimize the generation of secondary waste streams with their associated treatment and disposal. A particularly promising in situ remediation technology is bioremediation. For inorganic contaminants such as radionuclides and metals, in situ bioremediation can be used to alter the mobility or reduce the toxicity of radionuclides and metals by changing the valence state of the radionuclides and metals, degrading or producing complexing ligands, or facilitating partitioning on to or off of solid phases. The purpose of the research presented here was to explore microbially facilitated partitioning of metal and radionuclides by their co-precipitation with calcium carbonate. Although this approach is a very attractive cleanup alternative, its practical implementation requires improved scientific understanding of the geochemical and biological mechanisms involved, particularly with respect to rates and mechanisms of microbially facilitated calcite precipitation. Of interest for this investigation is the in situ manipulation of calcite precipitation by the microbially catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The production of ammonia during microbial decomposition of urea tends to drive pH upwards, and results in formation of alkaline conditions. When solution concentrations of Ca2+ and HCO3- are high enough, calcium carbonate precipitation may occur. A series of water samples collected from four wells tapping the aquifer underlying Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) all tested positively for the presence of urea degrading ...
Date: April 12, 2003
Creator: Ferris, F. Grant
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

Description: 1. Objective The general objective of this research was to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2), and modest ranges of T and P. This would be done by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry. Also, nanoscale observations of calcite surface morphology and composition would be made to provide an understanding of rate controlling mechanisms.
Date: November 15, 2010
Creator: Chapman, Piers & Morse, John W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calcium Carbonate Storage in Amorphous Form and Its Template-Induced Crystallization

Description: Calcium carbonate crystallization in organisms often occurs through the transformation from the amorphous precursor. It is believed that the amorphous phase could be temporarily stabilized and stored, until its templated transition to the crystalline form is induced. Here we develop a bio-inspired crystallization strategy that is based on the above mechanism. Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) spherulitic particles are formed and stabilized on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of hydroxy-terminated alkanethiols on Au surface. The ACC is stored as a reservoir for ions and is induced to crystallize on command by introducing a secondary surface that is functionalized with carboxylic acid-terminated SAM. This secondary surface acts as a template for oriented and patterned nucleation. Various oriented crystalline arrays and micropatterned films are formed. We also show that the ACC phase can be doped with foreign ions (e.g. Mg) and organic molecules (e.g. dyes) and that these dopants later function as growth modifiers of calcite crystals and become incorporated into the crystals during the transformation process of ACC to calcite. We believe that our strategy opens the way of using a stabilized amorphous phase as a versatile reservoir system that can be converted in a highly controlled fashion to a crystalline form upon contacting the nucleating template.
Date: August 31, 2007
Creator: Han, T Y & Aizenberg, J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laurentide Ice Sheet meltwater and abrupt climate change during the last glaciation

Description: A leading hypothesis to explain abrupt climate change during the last glacial cycle calls on fluctuations in the margin of the North American Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS), which may have routed freshwater between the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and North Atlantic, affecting North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) variability and regional climate. Paired measurements of {delta}O and Mg/Ca of foraminiferal calcite from GOM sediments reveal five episodes of LIS meltwater input from 28-45 thousand years ago (ka) that do not match the millennial-scale Dansgaard-Oeschger (D/O) warmings recorded in Greenland ice. We suggest that summer melting of the LIS may occur during Antarctic warming and likely contributed to sea-level variability during Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3).
Date: October 2, 2005
Creator: Hill, H W; Flower, B P; Quinn, T M; Hollander, D J & Guilderson, T P
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chemical Stimulation of Engineered Geothermal Systems

Description: The objective of this project is to design, develop and demonstrate methods for the chemical stimulation of candidate EGS reservoirs as well as the chemical treatment of mineral-scaled wellbores. First, a set of candidate chemical compounds capable of dissolving calcite was identified. A series of tests was then performed on each candidate in order to screen it for thermal stability and reactivity towards calcite. A detailed analysis was then performed on each compound that emerged from the screening tests in order to characterize its decay kinetics and reaction kinetics as functions of temperature and chemical composition. From among the compounds emerging from the laboratory studies, one compounds was chosen for a field experiment in order to verify the laboratory predictions.
Date: August 8, 2008
Creator: Rose, Peter, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Ngatamariki Geothermal Field, NZ: Surface Manifestations - Past and Present

Description: The Ngatamariki geothermal field, located 7 km south of Orakeikorako, discharges dilute chloride-bicarbonate waters of almost neutral pH from springs mostly on the margins of the field. Rhyolite tuffs in the northwestern part of the field are weakly silicified, probably due to their having reacted with heated groundwaters. Sinter deposits are common at Ngatamariki but are mostly relict from former activity. In 1994, the natural heat loss from the field was 30 {+-} 5 MW{sub thermal}. There has been a shift of thermal activity southward over the past 60 years; the changes were recognized by comparing air photographs taken in 1941 and 1991. In 1948, a hydrothermal eruption deposited breccia around its crater, which is now occupied by a pool at 52.5 C. Another pool at 88 C, first noticed in 1993, deposits a mixture of silica and calcite.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Brotheridge, J.M.A.; Browne, P.R.L. & Hochstein, M.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Temperature and vital effect controls on Bamboo coral (Isididae) isotopegeochemistry: A test of the "lines method"

Description: Deep-sea bamboo corals hold promise as long-term climatic archives, yet little information exists linking bamboo coral geochemistry to measured environmental parameters. This study focuses on a suite of 10 bamboo corals collected from the Pacific and Atlantic basins (250-2136 m water depth) to investigate coral longevity, growth rates, and isotopic signatures. Calcite samples for stable isotopes and radiocarbon were collected from the base the corals, where the entire history of growth is recorded. In three of the coral specimens, samples were also taken from an upper branch for comparison. Radiocarbon and growth band width analyses indicate that the skeletal calcite precipitates from ambient dissolved inorganic carbon and that the corals live for 150-300 years, with extension rates of 9-128 {micro}m/yr. A linear relationship between coral calcite {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C indicates that the isotopic composition is influenced by vital effects ({delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C slope of 0.17-0.47). As with scleractinian deep-sea corals, the intercept from a linear regression of {delta}{sup 18}O versus {delta}{sup 13}C is a function of temperature, such that a reliable paleotemperature proxy can be obtained, using the 'lines method.' Although the coral calcite {delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C slope is maintained throughout the coral base ontogeny, the branches and central cores of the bases exhibit {delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C values that are shifted far from equilibrium. We find that a reliable intercept value can be derived from the {delta}{sup 18}O:{delta}{sup 13}C regression of multiple samples distributed throughout one specimen or from multiple samples within individual growth bands.
Date: March 1, 2011
Creator: Hill, T M; Spero, H J; Guilderson, T P; LaVigne, M; Clague, D; Macalello, S et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final report for DOE Grant No. DE-SC0006609 - Persistence of Microbially Facilitated Calcite Precipitation as an in situ Treatment for Strontium-90

Description: Subsurface radionuclide and metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE?s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide Sr-90, is co-precipitation in calcite. We have previously found that nutrient addition can stimulate microbial ureolytic activity, that this activity accelerates calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of Sr, and that higher calcite precipitation rates can result in increased Sr partitioning. We have conducted integrated field, laboratory, and computational research to evaluate the relationships between ureolysis and calcite precipitation rates and trace metal partitioning under environmentally relevant conditions, and investigated the coupling between flow/flux manipulations and precipitate distribution. A field experimental campaign conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site located at Rifle, CO was based on a continuous recirculation design; water extracted from a down-gradient well was amended with urea and molasses (a carbon and electron donor) and re-injected into an up-gradient well. The goal of the recirculation design and simultaneous injection of urea and molasses was to uniformly accelerate the hydrolysis of urea and calcite precipitation over the entire inter-wellbore zone. The urea-molasses recirculation phase lasted, with brief interruptions for geophysical surveys, for 12 days and was followed by long-term monitoring which continued for 13 months. A post experiment core located within the inter-wellbore zone was collected on day 321 and characterized with respect to cation exchange capacity, mineral carbonate content, urease activity, ureC gene abundance, extractable ammonium (a urea hydrolysis product) content, and the C-13 isotopic composition of solid carbonates. It was also subjected to selective extractions for strontium and uranium. Result of the core characterization suggest that urea hydrolysis occurred primarily within the upper portion of the inter-wellbore zone and that strontium was mobilized from cation exchange sites and subsequently co-precipitated with new ...
Date: November 15, 2013
Creator: Smith, Robert W & Fujita, Yoshiko
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quantitative laboratory measurements of biogeochemical processes controlling biogenic calcite carbon sequestration.

Description: The purpose of this LDRD was to generate data that could be used to populate and thereby reduce the uncertainty in global carbon cycle models. These efforts were focused on developing a system for determining the dissolution rate of biogenic calcite under oceanic pressure and temperature conditions and on carrying out a digital transcriptomic analysis of gene expression in response to changes in pCO2, and the consequent acidification of the growth medium.
Date: January 1, 2011
Creator: Zendejas, Frank; Lane, Todd W. & Lane, Pamela D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

3-D sedimentological and geophysical studies of clastic reservoir analogs: Facies architecture, reservoir properties, and flow behavior within delta front facies elements of the Cretaceous Wall Creek Member, Frontier Formation, Wyoming

Description: This project examined the internal architecture of delta front sandstones at two locations within the Turonian-age Wall Creek Member of the Frontier Formation, in Wyoming. The project involved traditional outcrop field work integrated with core-data, and 2D and 3D ground penetrating radar (GPR) imaging from behind the outcrops. The fluid-flow engineering work, handled through a collaborative grant given to PI Chris White at LSU, focused on effects on fluid flow of late-stage calcite cement nodules in 3D. In addition to the extensive field component, the work funded 2 PhD students (Gani and Lee) and resulted in publication of 10 technical papers, 17 abstracts, and 4 internal field guides. PI Bhattacharya also funded an additional 3 PhD students that worked on the Wall Creek sandstone funded separately through an industrial consortium, two of whom graduated in the fall 2006 ((Sadeque and Vakarelov). These additional funds provided significant leverage to expand the work to include a regional stratigraphic synthesis of the Wall Creek Member of the Frontier Formation, in addition to the reservoir-scale studies that DOE directly funded. Awards given to PI Bhattacharya included the prestigious AAPG Distinguished Lecture Award, which involved a tour of about 25 Universities and Geological Societies in the US and Canada in the fall of 2005 and Spring of 2006. Bhattacharya gave two talks, one entitled “Applying Deltaic and Shallow Marine Outcrop Analogs to the Subsurface”, which highlighted the DOE sponsored work and the other titled “Martian River Deltas and the Origin of Life”. The outcrop analog talk was given at about 1/2 of the venues visited.
Date: February 16, 2007
Creator: Bhattacharya, Janok P. & McMechan, George A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pore scale modeling of reactive transport involved in geologic CO2 sequestration

Description: We apply a multi-component reactive transport lattice Boltzmann model developed in previolls studies to modeling the injection of a C02 saturated brine into various porous media structures at temperature T=25 and 80 C. The porous media are originally consisted of calcite. A chemical system consisting of Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, H+, CO2(aq), and CI-is considered. The fluid flow, advection and diHusion of aqueous species, homogeneous reactions occurring in the bulk fluid, as weB as the dissolution of calcite and precipitation of dolomite are simulated at the pore scale. The effects of porous media structure on reactive transport are investigated. The results are compared with continuum scale modeling and the agreement and discrepancy are discussed. This work may shed some light on the fundamental physics occurring at the pore scale for reactive transport involved in geologic C02 sequestration.
Date: January 1, 2009
Creator: Kang, Qinjin; Lichtner, Peter C; Viswanathan, Hari S & Abdel-fattah, Amr I
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final report for grant number DE-FG02-06ER64244 to the University of Idaho (RW Smith)-coupling between flow and precipitation in heterogeneous subsurface environments and effects on contaminant fate and transport

Description: Engineered remediation strategies for inducing mineral precipitation in the subsurface typically involve the introduction of at least one reactant either by direct injection or by in situ generation. The localization of reactant sources means a wide range of saturation states and ion ratios will be created as reactants are mixed: These conditions together can result in a wide range of precipitation rates, as well as impact which mineral phase precipitates. This is potentially important for the capacity of the precipitates to take up of trace metal contaminants, for their long term stability. Aragonite, for example, is able to sequester a larger amount of Sr than calcite. However, aragonite is less stable under typical groundwater conditions, and so may release sequestered Sr over time as the aragonite transforms to a more stable phase. In addition, previous experimental studies have indicated that other system constituents may influence calcium carbonate precipitation and consequently the Sr uptake potential of a system. For example, dissolved organic carbon (at levels typical of groundwaters) can suppress crystal growth. As a result, the continuous nucleation of small crystals, rather than growth of existing crystals, may be the dominant mode of precipitation. This has the potential for greater uptake of Sr because the smaller crystal sizes associated with nucleated calcite may more readily accommodate the distortion resulting from substitution of the larger Sr ion for Ca ions than can larger crystals. However, these smaller crystals may also be less stable and over the long term release Sr as a result of Ostwald ripening. To better understand the formation and composition of relevant calcium carbonate mineral phases two related series of mineral precipitation experiments were conducted. The first series of experiments, conducted using a Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) operated at steady state rates of precipitation was focused on understanding ...
Date: June 18, 2010
Creator: Smith, Robert W.; Beig, Mikala S.; Gebrehiwet, Tsigabu; Corriveau, Catherine E.; Redden, George & Fujita, Yoshiko
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Importance of mineralogical data for groundwater quality affectedby CO2 leakage

Description: Recently, geological storage of CO{sub 2} has been extensively investigated. The impact of leakage from CO{sub 2} storage reservoirs on groundwater quality is one of the concerns. Dissolution of CO{sub 2} in groundwater results in a decrease in pH. Such acidic condition can affect the dissolution and sorption mechanisms of many minerals (Jaffe and Wang, 2004). Some heavy-metal-bearing minerals dissolve under acidic conditions. For example, galena (PbS) can dissolve and increase significantly Pb concentrations and diminish groundwater quality. If calcite is present in the rock, it can buffer the pH and decrease galena dissolution. Therefore, mineralogical composition and distribution in caprock, overlying aquifers, and along the leakage paths are important data that should be obtained from site characterization. Insight into which minerals and compounds are most important for groundwater quality can be obtained from reactive geochemical transport simulations. Here we present results of simulations using the code TOUGHREACT, whose physical and chemical process capabilities have been discussed by Xu et al. (2006). The simulator can be applied to one-, two-, or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity, and can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases.
Date: February 13, 2006
Creator: Xu, Tianfu
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

Description: There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have acquired field oil and core samples and field brine compositions from Marathon. We have conducted preliminary adsorption and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Receding contact angles increase with surfactant adsorption. Plans for the next quarter include conducting adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies.
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Mohanty, Kishore K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Diffusion of Ca and Mg in Calcite

Description: The self-diffusion of Ca and the tracer diffusion of Mg in calcite have been experimentally measured using isotopic tracers of {sup 25}Mg and {sup 44}Ca. Natural single crystals of calcite were coated with a thermally-sputtered oxide thin film and then annealed in a CO{sub 2} gas at one atmosphere total pressure and temperatures from 550 to 800 C. Diffusion coefficient values were derived from the depth profiles obtained by ion microprobe analysis. The resultant activation energies for Mg tracer diffusion and Ca self-diffusion are respectively: E{sub a}(Mg) = 284 {+-} 74 kJ/mol and E{sub a}(Ca) = 271 {+-} 80 kJ/mol. For the temperature ranges in these experiments, the diffusion of Mg is faster than Ca. The results are generally consistent in magnitude with divalent cation diffusion rates obtained in previous studies and provide a means of interpreting the thermal histories of carbonate minerals, the mechanism of dolomitization, and other diffusion-controlled processes. The results indicate that cation diffusion in calcite is relatively slow and cations are the rate-limiting diffusing species for the deformation of calcite and carbonate rocks. Application of the calcite-dolomite geothermometer to metamorphic assemblages will be constrained by cation diffusion and cooling rates. The direct measurement of Mg tracer diffusion in calcite indicates that dolomitization is unlikely to be accomplished by Mg diffusion in the solid state but by a recrystallization process.
Date: February 10, 1999
Creator: Cygan, R.T. & Fisler, D.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department