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Hospital waste shredder test series at the DONLEE Pilot Test Facility

Description: This report describes the coal firing and coal and noninfectious hospital waste co-firing testing and emissions rates for the tests conducted at the DONLEE pilot plant facility during mid-December 1991 through early March 1992. The emissions obtained during these tests are in turn used to predict the emission rates for the proof-of-concept facility that is to be built at the Lebanon Veterans Affairs Medical Center. In addition, the reliability and performance of the waste shredding/feeding system were evaluated from this testing.
Date: September 1, 1992
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

Description: This report presents the results of Run 261 performed at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The run started on January 12, 1991 and continued until May 31, 1991, operating in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode processing Illinois No. 6 seam bituminous coal (from Burning star No. 2 mine). In the first part of Run 261, a new bimodal catalyst, EXP-AO-60, was tested for its performance and attrition characteristics in the catalytic/catalytic mode of the CC-ITSL process. The main objective of this part of the run was to obtain good process performance in the low/high temperature mode of operation along with well-defined distillation product end boiling points. In the second part of Run 261, Criterion (Shell) 324 catalyst was tested. The objective of this test was to evaluate the operational stability and catalyst and process performance while processing the high ash Illinois No. 6 coal. Increasing viscosity and preasphaltenes made it difficult to operate at conditions similar to EXP-AO-60 catalyst operation, especially at lower catalyst replacement rates.
Date: September 1, 1992
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor

Description: The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the combustion of coal and coal wastes in a rotary kiln reactor with limestone addition for sulfur control. The rationale for the project was the perception that rotary systems could bring several advantages to combustion of these fuels, and may thus offer an alternative to fluid-bed boilers. Towards this end, an existing wood pyrolysis kiln (the Humphrey Charcoal kiln) was to be suitably refurbished and retrofitted with a specially designed version of a patented air distributor provided by Universal Energy, Inc. (UEI). As the project progressed beyond the initial stages, a number of issues were raised regarding the feasibility and the possible advantages of burning coals in a rotary kiln combustor and, in particular, the suitability of the Humphrey Charcoal kiln as a combustor. Instead, an opportunity arose to conduct combustion tests in the PEDCO Rotary Cascading-Bed Boiler (RCBB) commercial demonstration unit at the North American Rayon CO. (NARCO) in Elizabethton, TN. The tests focused on anthracite culm and had two objectives: (a) determine the feasibility of burning anthracite culms in a rotary kiln boiler and (b) obtain input for any further work involving the Humphrey Charcoal kiln combustor. A number of tests were conducted at the PEDCO unit. The last one was conducted on anthracite culm procured directly from the feed bin of a commercial circulating fluid-bed boiler. The results were disappointing; it was difficult to maintain sustained combustion even when large quantities of supplemental fuel were used. Combustion efficiency was poor, around 60 percent. The results suggest that the rotary kiln boiler, as designed, is ill-suited with respect to low-grade, hard to burn solid fuels, such as anthracite culm. Indeed, data from combustion of bituminous coal in the PEDCO unit suggest that with respect to coal in general, the rotary ...
Date: September 11, 1992
Creator: Cobb, J.T. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EERC pilot-scale CFBC evaluation facility Project CFB test results

Description: Project CFB was initiated at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in May 1988. Specific goals of the project were to (1) construct a circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) facility representative of the major boiler vendors' designs with the capability of producing scalable data, (2) develop a database for use in making future evaluations of CFBC technology, and (3) provide a facility for evaluating fuels, free of vendor bias for use in the - energy industry. Five coals were test-burned in the 1-MWth unit: North Dakota and Asian lignites, a Wyoming subbituminous, and Colorado and Pennsylvania bituminous coats. A total of 54 steady-state test periods were conducted, with the key test parameters being the average combustor temperature, excess air, superficial gas velocity, calcium-to-sulfur molar ratio, and the primary air-to-secondary air split. The capture for a coal fired in a CFBC is primarily dependent upon the total alkali-to-sulfur ratio. The required alkali-to ratio for 90% sulfur retention ranged from 1.4 to 4.9, depending upon coal type. While an alkali-to-ratio of 4.9 was required to meet 90% sulfur retention for the Salt Creek coal versus 1.4 for the Asian lignite, the total amount of sorbent addition required is much less for the Salt Creek coal, 4.2 pound sorbent per million Btu coal input, versus 62 pound/million Btu for the Asian lignite. The bituminous coals tested show optimal capture at combustor temperatures of approximately 1550[degree]F, with low-rank coals having optimal sulfur capture approximately 100[degree]F lower.
Date: September 1, 1992
Creator: Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Henderson, A.K. & Moe, T.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of a flexible definition of new source performance standards for utility boilers firing anthracite coal

Description: The primary constraints and incentives affecting the viability of increased anthracite production for use as a utility boiler fuel are related to: (1) inherent advantages and disadvantages of anthracite versus bituminous coal, (2) geographical considerations, and (3) the existing and future state and federal regulatory framework. Anthracite is inherently low in sulfur content (a nominal 0.7% versus 2.0% for bituminous coal) and thus is capable of providing energy in a more environmentally beneficial manner than alternative coal resources. In addition, anthracite is characterized by a higher energy output (5% higher per pound) than bituminous coal. On the other hand, anthracite is difficult to mine because of its hardness and the geological environment where it occurs, and thus incurs an initial cost disadvantage relative to alternative fuels. Anthracite has a higher ignition and burning temperature than bituminous coal and thus requires more costly boilers. Additionally, anthracite requires more costly particulate-removal systems than does bituminous and is somewhat more costly to tranport by rail. A potential major negative factor is the variability of sulfur content within anthracite deposits. The geographic location of the anthracite region creates a number of economic and environmental advantages that influence the viability of increased anthracite production. Anthracite fields in Pennsylvania are within 150 miles of approximately one eighth of the US population, making anthracite more favorable for mine-month power generation than bituminous coal. The anthracite region is currently economically drpressed and unsuitable for most nonmining uses. Thus, anthracite production carries with it a potential for local beneficial environmental and socioeconomic benefits.
Date: September 1, 1978
Creator: Buckley, B; DeFieux, R; Holzheimer, R; Lowenthal, S; Murphy, B & Watson, J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nitrogen oxide abatement by distributed fuel addition

Description: Reburning is examined as a means of NO{sub x} destruction in a 17 kW down-fired pulverized coal combustor. In reburning, a secondary fuel is introduced downstream of the primary flame to produce a reducing zone, favorable to NO destruction, and air is introduced further downstream to complete the combustion. Emphasis is on natural gas reburning and a bituminous coal primary flame. A parametric examination of reburning employing a statistical experimental design, is conducted, complemented by detailed experiments. Mechanisms governing the inter-conversion of nitrogenous species in the fuel rich reburn zone is explored. The effect of reburning on N{sub 2}O emissions, the effect of primary flame mode (premixed and diffusion) and the effect of distributing the reburning fuel, are also investigated.
Date: September 20, 1991
Creator: Wendt, J.O.L. & Mereb, J.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Confined zone dispersion flue gas desulfurization demonstration

Description: The CZD process involves flue gas post-treatment, physically located between a boiler's outlet and its particulate collector, which in the majority of cases is an electrostatic precipitator. The features that distinguish this process from other similar injection processes are: Injection of an alkaline slurry directly into the duct, instead of injection of dry solids into the duct ahead of a fabric filter. Use of an ultrafine calcium/magnesium hydroxide, type S pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime. This commercial product is made from plentiful, naturally occurring dolomite. Low residence time, made possibly by the high effective surface area of the type S lime. Localized dispersion of the reagent. Slurry droplets contact only part of the gas while the droplets are drying, to remove up to 50 percent of the SO{sub 2} and significant amounts of NO{sub x}. The process uses dual fluid rather than rotary atomizers. Improved ESP performance via gas conditioning from the increased water vapor content, and lower temperatures. Supplemental conditioning with SO{sub 3} is not believed necessary for satisfactory removal of particulate matter. The waste product is composed of magnesium and calcium sulfite and sulfate, with some excess lime. This product mixed with fly ash is self-stabilizing because of the excess lime values, and thus tends to retain heavy metals in insoluble forms within the fly ash.
Date: September 5, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spin-mapping of coal structures with ESE and ENDOR

Description: A nondestructive method to determine the atomic and molecular structures present in the organic (maceral) components of whole coal and coal products has been sought for many years. This program of research is designed to address that analytical need by applying advanced electron magnetic resonance techniques to the determination of coal molecular structure. Structural information has be obtained by using the naturally occurring unpaired electrons in coal as observation posts'' from which to survey neighboring atoms through the electron-nuclear hyperfine interaction. Such an overall approach has been termed ELECTRON SPIN MAPPING of coal structure. New techniques like 2-dimensional ENDOR and ESE spectroscopies and multifrequency EPR, including the world's first S-band ESE spectrometer and one of the first W-band instruments, which we have developed in our laboratory, were employed in the determination. The materials studied were well separated macerals obtained by density gradient centrifugation techniques from Illinois {number sign}6 coals, a well as whole Illinois {number sign}6, {number sign}5, and Argonne Premium Sample Coals. model compounds, chosen to represent molecular structures typical of those believed to exist in coal also were studied by the various electron magnetic resonance (EMR) methods. Utilizing the various EMR methods available in our laboratory, we studied approaches to determine parameters that direcly reflect the atomic and molecular structure of coal. The naturally occurring unpaired electrons in coal were utilized as probes of their local environment, which they reflect through hyperfine interactions with neighboring 1 > 0 nuclei (eg, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C).
Date: September 1, 1990
Creator: Belford, R.L. & Clarkson, R.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Task 5, Bench- scale process testing

Description: Under the overall objectives of DOE Contract Engineering Development of Selective Agglomeration,'' there were a number of specific objectives in the Task 5 program. The prime objectives of Task 5 are highlighted below: (1) Maximize process performance in pyritic sulfur rejection and BTU recovery, (2) Produce a low ash product, (3) Compare the performance of the heavy agglomerant process based on diesel and the light agglomerant process using heptane, (4) Define optimum processing conditions for engineering design, (5) Provide first-level evaluation of product handleability, and (6) Explore and investigate process options/ideas which may enhance process performance and/or product handleability.
Date: September 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems

Description: The technical objectives of this project are: (1) To define the partitioning of inorganic constituents associated with raw coal particles among products (including vapors, aerosols, and residual char/ash particles) formed under conditions representative of pulverized coal flames as a function of the specific (intrinsic and extrinsic) characteristics of the raw coal and the environment in which the transformations occur; and to characterize the resultant spectrum of products in detail. (2) To elucidate and quantify the fundamental processes (involving basic principles of physics, chemistry, thermodynamics) by which transformations of the inorganic constituents occur; and (3) to develop, based on the information required in (1) and (2), a tractable process'' model capable of predicting the significant features of the transformation process, most importantly, the nature and distribution of products. 26 refs., 151 figs., 51 tabs.
Date: September 1, 1991
Creator: Helble, J.J.; Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States)); Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigate the effectivness of calcium-treated coals in the capture of sulfur gases generated in staged fired combustors. Third quarterly technical progress report, May 1-July 31, 1983

Description: In this quarter's work, a new procedure was developed to add calcium to pulverized coal. The method has been found to increase the calcium content of bituminous coal to 12% calcium by weight, which corresponds to a Ca/S ratio of greater than 2. Progress was also made on the combustion test facility this quarter. A new modification of the low-flow coal feeder has made that system steady and reliable. With the furnace wired and plumbed, and the other subsystems complete, the facility is almost ready to burn the treated coals.
Date: September 1, 1983
Creator: Porter, J. H.; Manning, M. P.; Benedek, K. R. & Sharma, P. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) investigation of the chemical association and molecular dynamics in asphalt ridge tar sand ore and bitumen

Description: Preliminary studies on tar sand bitumen given in this report have shown that the reassociation of tar sand bitumen to its original molecular configuration after thermal stressing is a first-order process requiring nearly a week to establish equilibrium. Studies were also conducted on the dissolution of tar sand bitumen in solvents of varying polarity. At a high-weight fraction of solute to solvent the apparent molecular weight of the bitumen molecules was greater than that of the original bitumen when dissolved in chloroform-d/sub 1/ and benzene-d/sub 6/. This increase in the apparent molecular weight may be due to micellar formation or a weak solute-solvent molecular complex. Upon further dilution with any of the solvents studied, the apparent molecular weight of the tar sand bitumen decreased because of reduced van der Waals forces of interaction and/or hydrogen bonding. To define the exact nature of the interactions, it will be necessary to have viscosity measurements of the solutions. 30 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.
Date: September 1, 1987
Creator: Netzel, D.A. & Coover, P.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

International energy indicators

Description: Data are compiled and graphs are presented for Iran: Crude Oil Capacity, Production and Shut-in, 1974-1980; Saudi Arabia: Crude Oil Capacity, Production and Shut-in, 1974-1980; OPEC (Ex-Iran and Saudi Arabia): Capacity, Production and Shut-in, 1974-1980; Non-OPEC Free World and US Production of Crude Oil, 1973-1980; Oil Stocks: Free World, US, Japan and Europe (landed), 1973-1980; Petroleum Consumption by Industrial Countries, 1973-1980; USSR Crude Oil Production, 1974-1980; Free World and US Nuclear Generation Capacity, 1973-1980; US Imports of Crude Oil and Products, 1973-1980; Landed Cost of Saudi Crude in Current and 1974 Dollars; US Trade in Bituminous Coal, 1973-1980; Summary of US Merchandise Trade, 1976-1980; and Energy/GNP Ratio.
Date: September 1, 1980
Creator: Bauer, E. K. (ed.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products (Task 1), Volume 1

Description: Under US DOE sponsorship, a project team consisting of the Institute of Gas Technology, Peabody Holding Company, and Bechtel Group, Inc. has been developing an advanced, mild gasification process to process all types of coal and to produce solid and condensable liquid co-products that can open new markets for coal. The three and a half year program (September 1987 to June 1991) consisted of investigations in four main areas. These areas are: (1) Literature Survey of Mild Gasification Processes, Co-Product Upgrading and Utilization, and Market Assessment; (2) Mild Gasification Technology Development: Process Research Unit Tests Using Slipstream Sampling; (3) Bench-Scale Char Upgrading Study; (4) Mild Gasification Technology Development: System Integration Studies. In this report, the literature and market assessment of mild gasification processes are discussed.
Date: September 1, 1991
Creator: Knight, R.A.; Gissy, J.L.; Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P.; Carty, R.H. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Duthie, R.G. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)) et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of an Advanced, Continuous Mild Gasification Process for the Production of Co-Products (Tasks 2, 3, and 4. 1 to 4. 6), Volume 2

Description: Volume 2 contains information on the following topics: (1) Mild Gasification Technology Development: Process Research Unit Tests Using Slipstream Sampling; (2) Bench-Scale Char Upgrading Study; (3) Mild Gasification Technology Development: System Integration Studies. (VC)
Date: September 1991
Creator: Knight, R. A.; Gissy, J. L.; Onischak, M.; Babu, S. P.; Carty, R. H.; Duthie, R. G. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comprehensive report to Congress: Clean Coal Technology program: Evaluation of gas reburning and low-NO sub x burners on a wall-fired boiler

Description: This report briefly describes the Gas Reburning and Low-NO{sub x} Burners technology which is a low-cost technology that can be applied in both retrofit and new applications. This demonstration will be conducted on a utility boiler in Colorado at Cherokee Station {number sign}3; however, the technology is applicable to industrial boilers and other combustion systems. Although this technology is primarily a NO{sub x} reduction technology, some reductions in other emissions will take place. Since 15--20% of the coal is replaced with natural gas, SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions are reduced commensurately. Also the lower carbon-to-hydrogen ratio of natural gas compared to coal reduces CO{sub 2} emissions. The formation of NO{sub x} is controlled by several factors: (1) the amount of nitrogen that is chemically bound in the fuel; (2) the flame temperature; (3) the residence time that combustion products remain at very high temperatures; and (4) the amount of excess oxygen available, especially at the hottest parts of the flame. Decreasing any of these parameters, tends to reduce NO{sub x} formation. 6 figs., 1 tab.
Date: September 1, 1990
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pelletizing/reslurrying as a means of distributing and firing clean coal

Description: The objective of this study is to develop technology that permits the practical and economic preparation, storage, handling, and transportation of coal pellets, which can be formulated into Coal-Water Fuels (CWFs) suitable for firing in small- and medium-size commercial and industrial boilers, furnaces, and engines.
Date: September 20, 1991
Creator: Conkle, H. N.; Raghavan, J. K.; Smit, F. J. & Jha, M. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Emissions of airborne toxics from coal-fired boilers: Mercury

Description: Concerns over emissions of hazardous air Pollutants (air toxics) have emerged as a major environmental issue, and the authority of the US Environmental Protection Agency to regulate such pollutants was greatly expanded through the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Mercury has been singled out for particular attention because of concerns over possible effects of emissions on human health. This report evaluates available published information on the mercury content of coals mined in the United States, on mercury emitted in coal combustion, and on the efficacy of various environmental control technologies for controlling airborne emissions. Anthracite and bituminous coals have the highest mean-mercury concentrations, with subbituminous coals having the lowest. However, all coal types show very significant variations in mercury concentrations. Mercury emissions from coal combustion are not well-characterized, particularly with regard to determination of specific mercury compounds. Variations in emission rates of more than an order of magnitude have been reported for some boiler types. Data on the capture of mercury by environmental control technologies are available primarily for systems with electrostatic precipitators, where removals of approximately 20% to over 50% have been reported. Reported removals for wet flue-gas-desulfurization systems range between 35 and 95%, while spray-dryer/fabric-filter systems have given removals of 75 to 99% on municipal incinerators. In all cases, better data are needed before any definitive judgments can be made. This report briefly reviews several areas of research that may lead to improvements in mercury control for existing flue-gas-clean-up technologies and summarizes the status of techniques for measuring mercury emissions from combustion sources.
Date: September 1, 1991
Creator: Huang, H. S.; Livengood, C. D. & Zaromb, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Healy Clean Coal Project

Description: The objective of the Healy Clean Coal Project is to demonstrate the integration of an advanced combustor and heat recovery system with both high and low temperature emission control processes. The resulting emission levels of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and particulates are expected to be significantly better than the federal New Source Performance Standards. 3 figs. (VC)
Date: September 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LIMB Demonstration Project Extension

Description: The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full-scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO and NO emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.
Date: September 15, 1988
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pelletization of fine coals

Description: The present research project attempts to provide a basis to determine the pelletizability of fine coals, to ascertain the role of additives and binders and to establish a basis for binder selection. Currently, there are no established techniques for determining the quality of coal pellets. Our research is intended to develop a series of tests on coal pellets to measure their storage characteristics, transportability, ease of gasification and rate of combustion. Information developed from this research should be valuable for making knowledgeable decisions for on-time plant design, occasional binder selection and frequent process control during the pelletization of coal fines. During the last quarter, we continued the batch pelletization studies on Upper Freeport coal. The results as presented in that last quarterly report (April 1991) indicated that the surface conditions on the coal particle influenced the pelletizing growth rates. For example, a fresh (run of mine) sample of coal will display different pelletizing growth kinetics than a weathered sample of the same coal. Since coal is a heterogeneous material, the oxidized product of coal is equally variable. We found it to be logistically difficult to consistently produce large quantities of artificially oxidized coal for experimental purposes and as such we have used a naturally weathered coal. We have plans to oxidize coals under controlled oxidizing conditions and be able to establish their pelletizing behavior. The next phase of experiments were directed to study the effect of surface modification, introduced during the coal cleaning steps, on pelletizing kinetics. Accordingly, we initiated studies with two additives commonly used during the flotation of coal: dextrin (coal depressant) and dodecane (coal collector).
Date: September 1, 1991
Creator: Sastry, K.V.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures

Description: Effects of pressure, temperature, and coal type on coal plasticity were investigated. Seven coals, from the Argonne premium sample bank ranging from lignite to low volatile bituminous, were studied. Elevated pressures, up to 10 atm of helium, did not affect coal plasticity, but reducing pressure from atmosphere to vacuum resulted in diminished plasticity, i.e. a shorter plastic period and a higher minimum apparent viscosity. It is hypothesized that high pressure inhibits mass transport of metaplast to tar vapors, but also favors metaplast repolymerization into coke and char. Higher holding temperature decreased the coal plastic period. It is hypothesized that higher temperature increases mass transport of liquid metaplast to tar vapors and metaplast repolymerization to coke and char. Heating rate had essentially no effect on the individual softening temperatures of five different plastic coals. Possible explanations are that, depending on coal type, metaplast generation, by chemical bond breaking or physical melting, or both, is not strongly affected by heating rate. In particular, for medium and low volatile bituminous cools, there is evidence that generation of the metaplast responsible for initial softening involves largely chemical bond breaking as opposed to physical melting.
Date: September 1, 1992
Creator: Gerjarusak, S.; Peters, W.A. & Howard, J.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Novel concept development of an internal recirculation catalyst for mild gasification

Description: The objective of this program is to provide an overall evaluation of a novel process concept for mild gasification by completing work in three major tasks: (1) Laboratory-Scale Experiments, (2) Bench-Scale Tests, and (3) Proof-of-Concept Tests and Evaluation (optional). During this quarter, experimental work involving zinc chloride as a potential recirculating catalyst for coal, initiated in the previous quarter, was continued. The design of an all-quartz laboratory-scale isothermal free-fall reactor was completed, and construction was begun. One free-fall experiment was performed in an existing stainless-steel free-fall reactor with methanol-treated Illinois No. 6 high-volatile bituminous coal. 1 ref., 2 figs., 2 tabs.
Date: September 1, 1988
Creator: Knight, R.A. & Babu, S.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels

Description: This three-year research project at Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE), will assess the potential economic and environmental benefits derived from coal beneficiation by various advanced cleaning processes. The objectives of this program include the development of a detailed generic engineering data base, comprised of fuel combustion and ash performance data on beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs), which is needed to permit broad application. This technical data base will provide detailed information on fundamental fuel properties influencing combustion and mineral matter behavior as well as quantitative performance data on combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and gaseous and particulate emissions. Program objectives also address the application of this technical data base to predict performance impacts associated with firing BCFs in various commercial boiler designs as well as assessment of the economic implications of BCF utilization. Additionally, demonstration of this technology, with respect to large-scale fuel preparation, firing equipment operation, fuel performance, environmental impacts, and verification of prediction methodology will be provided during field testing. Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFs, and two conventionally cleaned coals for the field test. Approximately nine BCFs will be in dry ultra fine coal (DUC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Up to 25 additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements. 1 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.
Date: September 1, 1989
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department