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Development of Amsinckia Grandiflora Restoration Techniques

Description: Amsinckia grandiflora is federally listed endangered species native to California valley grasslands. Demographic data were collected from marked plants found in experimental plots. A grass-selective herbicide was applied to a subset of the plots monitored. The height and survivorship data suggest that competitive pressure is greater in untreated plots. The demographic data will be used in the restoration of existing and creation of new A. grandiflora populations.
Date: March 12, 1999
Creator: Bissell, Erin & Carlsen, Tina
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A successful effort to involve stakeholders in the selection of a site for a corrective action management unit

Description: As part of the effort to clean up hazardous waste sites, Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico (SNL/NM) adopted a novel approach to involving stakeholders in a key decision associated with its Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The decision was where to locate a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU), an area designed to consolidate, store, and treat wastes generated from cleanup activities. The decision-making approach was a variation of a technique known as multiattribute utility analysis (MUA). Although MUA has rarely been undertaken during normal Project activities, it proved to be a surprisingly effective means for involving stakeholders in the decision process, generating consensus over a selected site, and enhancing public trust and understanding of Project activities. Requirements and criteria for selecting CAMU sites are provided by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) CAMU Final Rule (EPA 1993). Recognizing the lack of experience with the Rule and the importance of community understanding and support, the ER Project sought an approach that would allow stakeholders to participate in the site-selection process.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Conway, R.; Merkhofer, M.W. & Oms, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 114: Area 25 EMAD Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada

Description: This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions needed to achieve closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 114, Area 25 EMAD Facility, identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 114 comprises the following corrective action site (CAS) located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site: • 25-41-03, EMAD Facility This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing CAS 25-41-03. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 114 using the SAFER process. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a field investigation before selecting the appropriate corrective action for CAS 25-41-03. It is anticipated that the results of the field investigation and implementation of corrective actions will support a defensible recommendation that no further corrective action is necessary. If it is determined that complete clean closure cannot be accomplished during the SAFER, then a hold point will have been reached and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) will be consulted to determine whether the remaining contamination will be closed under the alternative corrective action of closure in place. This will be presented in a closure report that will be prepared and submitted to NDEP for review and approval. The CAS will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 30, 2009, by representatives of NDEP and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAS 25-41-03. The following text summarizes the SAFER activities that will support ...
Date: June 1, 2010
Creator: Krauss, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Streamlined approach for environmental restoration plan, CAU No. 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points landfill Tonopah test range

Description: This plan was prepared under the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) concept. The SAFER process is employed at Corrective Action Units (CAUs) where enough information exists about the nature and extent of contamination to propose an appropriate corrective action prior to the implementation of a Corrective Action Investigation (CAI). This process combines elements of the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process and the observational approach to help plan and conduct corrective actions. DQOs are used to identify the problem and define the type and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the process. The observational approach provides a framework for managing uncertainty and planning decision-making. The purpose of the investigation in the SAFER process is to document and verify the adequacy of existing information (such as process knowledge); to affirm the decision for clean closure, closure in place, or to take no further action; and to provide sufficient data to implement the corrective action.
Date: April 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Annual summary report on the surveillance and maintenance activities for the Oak Rige National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program for fiscal year 1995

Description: This Annual Summary Report on the Surveillance and Maintenance Activities for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program for Fiscal Year 1995 was prepared to communicate the accomplishments of the Program during fiscal year 1995. This work was performed under work breakdown structure element 1.4.12.6.1.14.20 (activity data sheet 3314, ``Remedial Action Surveillance and Maintenance``). Publication of this document meets the Life Cycle Baseline milestone date of November 30, 1995. This document provides the accomplishments for both the Remedial Action and Decontamination and Decommissioning Surveillance and Maintenance programs.
Date: November 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending July 31, 1995

Description: The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. Major additions to SREL Facilities were completed that will enhance the Laboratory`s work in the future. Following several years of planning, opening ceremonies were held for the 5000 ft{sup 2} multi-purpose conference center that was funded by the University of Georgia Research Foundation (UGARF). The center is located on 68 acres of land that was provided by the US Department of Energy. This joint effort between DOE and UGARF supports DOE`s new initiative to develop partnerships with the private sector and universities. The facility is being used for scientific meetings and environmental education programs for students, teachers and the general public. A 6000 ft{sup 2} office and library addition to S@s main building officially opened this year, and construction plans are underway on a new animal care facility, laboratory addition, and receiving building.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Smith, M.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lincoln Park shoreline erosion control project: Monitoring for surface substrate, infaunal bivalves and eelgrass, 1993

Description: In 1988, the US Army Corps of Engineers and the City of Seattle placed material on the upper beach at Lincoln Park, in West Seattle, Washington. The fill served to mitigate shoreline erosion that had caused undercutting and collapse of the seawall in several places. A series of pre- and post-construction studies have been conducted to assess the impacts to marine biota of fill placement and movement of surface substrate. This study was designed to monitor infaunal bivalves and eelgrass from intertidal areas in and adjacent to the area of original fill placement. Findings from this survey were compared to previous survey results to determine (1) if recruitment of infaunal bivalves to the fill area has occurred, (2) if infaunal bivalve densities outside the fill area are stable, and (3) if eelgrass distribution and abundance have remained stable along the adjacent shoreline. To maximize comparability of findings from this survey with previous studies, sampling techniques, transects, and tidal elevations were consistent with previous studies at this site.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Antrim, L. D.; Thom, R. M. & Gardiner, W. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event Symposium

Description: On March 19, 2008, policy makers, emergency managers, and medical and Public Health officials convened in Seattle, Washington, for a workshop on Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event. The day-long symposium was aimed at generating a dialogue about restoration and recovery through a discussion of the associated challenges that impact entire communities, including people, infrastructure, and critical systems.
Date: June 30, 2008
Creator: Lesperance, Ann M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Addendum 2 to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 454: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

Description: This document constitutes an addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 454: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for CASs: • 12-25-08, Spill H950524F (from UST 12-B-1) • 12-25-10, Spill H950919A (from UST 12-COMM-1) These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining these URs will be canceled, and the ...
Date: May 1, 2009
Creator: Evenson, Grant
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 452: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

Description: This document constitutes an addendum to the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 452: Historical Underground Storage Tank Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 1998 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the URs for CASs: • 25-25-09, Spill H940825C (from UST 25-3101-1) • 25-25-14, Spill H940314E (from UST 25-3102-3) • 25-25-15, Spill H941020E (from UST 25-3152-1) These URs were established as part of Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective actions and were based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since these URs were established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, these URs were re-evaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the URs) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove these URs because contamination is not present at these sites above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining ...
Date: May 1, 2009
Creator: Evenson, Grant
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Adaptive management: a paradigm for remediation of public facilities

Description: Public facility restoration planning traditionally focused on response to natural disasters and hazardous materials accidental releases. These plans now need to integrate response to terrorist actions. Therefore, plans must address a wide range of potential vulnerabilities. Similar types of broad remediation planning are needed for restoration of waste and hazardous material handling areas and facilities. There are strong similarities in damage results and remediation activities between unintentional and terrorist actions; however, the uncertainties associated with terrorist actions result in a re-evaluation of approaches to planning. Restoration of public facilities following a release of a hazardous material is inherently far more complex than in confined industrial settings and has many unique technical, economic, social, and political challenges. Therefore, they arguably involve a superset of drivers, concerns and public agencies compared to other restoration efforts. This superset of conditions increases complexity of interactions, reduces our knowledge of the initial conditions, and even condenses the timeline for restoration response. Therefore, evaluations of alternative restoration management approaches developed for responding to terrorist actions provide useful knowledge for large, complex waste management projects. Whereas present planning documents have substantial linearity in their organization, the 'adaptive management' paradigm provides a constructive parallel operations paradigm for restoration of facilities that anticipates and plans for uncertainty, multiple/simUltaneous public agency actions, and stakeholder participation. Adaptive management grew out of the need to manage and restore natural resources in highly complex and changing environments with limited knowledge about causal relationships and responses to restoration actions. Similarities between natural resource management and restoration of a facility and surrounding area(s) after a disruptive event suggest numerous advantages over preset linearly-structured plans by incorporating the flexibility and overlap of processes inherent in effective facility restoration. We discuss three restoration case studies (e.g., the Hart Senate Office Building anthrax restoration, Rocky Flats actinide remediation, ...
Date: January 1, 2009
Creator: Janecky, David R; Whicker, Jeffrey J & Doerr, Ted B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Diversity of macromycetes in Bandelier national monument 1991--1993, A survey

Description: Since the great La Mesa fire of 1977 in Bandelier, much attention has been given to the ensuing course of plant and animal life. This paper introduces the importance of fungi, the neglected third kingdom, and describes a field survey sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory and Bandelier. The survey sought macromycetes the fruits of large fungi, noting the position, habitat, type, host, date and other descriptive features. The emphasis was on diversity, as many species as we could find. The welfare of every species of vascular plants is intricately bound to an associated fungus, in a relationship which has evolved over time with the evolution of the plant species. The survey covered the three summer seasons of 1991--1993. We collected 836 specimens from a variety of habitats. These were identified, recorded in a computer database, dried, and stored, in an herbarium. We found members of 220 species in 111 genera. We were able to identify 97% of the specimens to genus, 83% to species. In Bandelier alone, we collected 145 specimens in 1991--1992 and 232 specimens in 1993. This involved 74 genera and 93 species in 1993. The three basic types were found: Parasitic Saprophytic, and Mycorrhizal. The latter type composes roughly three fourths of the collection. A variety of sites were studied, with special attention to sites at Bandelier that have, or will be, burned.
Date: April 1, 1994
Creator: Jarmie, N. & Rogers, F. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Yakima Fisheries Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement : Summary.

Description: The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP) to undertake fishery research and mitigation activities in the Yakima River Basin. The State of Washington and the Yakama Indian Nation (YIN) would jointly direct the project. In cooperation with BPA, the project managers propose to construct, operate and maintain anadromous (e.g. salmon) fish production facilities The goal is to conduct research activities designed to increase knowledge of supplementation techniques. These techniques would be applied to rebuild naturally spawning anadromous fish stocks historically present in the Yakima River Basin and, ultimately, those throughout the Columbia River Basin. Eventually, the YFP might involve the supplementation of all stocks of anadromous fish known to have occurred in the Yakima Basin. However, at this time only two action alternatives have been proposed, in addition to the No Action alternative: Alternative (1) would supplement depressed naturally spawning populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon; Alternative (2) (preferred) would include all actions under Alternative 1; it would also add a study to determine the feasibility of re-establishing a naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho salmon in the Yakima Basin (Coho smolts are currently being imported from another basin under the Columbia River Basin Fish Management Plan; the stock is now virtually eliminated from the Basin.)
Date: January 1996
Creator: United States. Bonneville Power Administration.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Waste management/waste certification plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Restoration Program

Description: This Waste Management/Waste Certification (C) Plan, written for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), outlines the criteria and methodologies to be used in the management of waste generated during ORNL ER field activities. Other agreed upon methods may be used in the management of waste with consultation with ER and Waste Management Organization. The intent of this plan is to provide information for the minimization, handling, and disposal of waste generated by ER activities. This plan contains provisions for the safe and effective management of waste consistent with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) guidance. Components of this plan have been designed to protect the environment and the health and safety of workers and the public. It, therefore, stresses that investigation derived waste (IDW) and other waste be managed to ensure that (1) all efforts be made to minimize the amount of waste generated; (2) costs associated with sampling storage, analysis, transportation, and disposal are minimized; (3) the potential for public and worker exposure is not increased; and (4) additional contaminated areas are not created.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Clark, C. Jr.; Hunt-Davenport, L.D. & Cofer, G.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

11th International Conference of Radiation Research

Description: Topics discussed in the conference included the following: Radiation Physics, Radiation Chemistry and modelling--Radiation physics and dosimetry; Electron transfer in biological media; Radiation chemistry; Biophysical and biochemical modelling; Mechanisms of DNA damage; Assays of DNA damage; Energy deposition in micro volumes; Photo-effects; Special techniques and technologies; Oxidative damage. Molecular and cellular effects-- Photobiology; Cell cycle effects; DNA damage: Strand breaks; DNA damage: Bases; DNA damage Non-targeted; DNA damage: other; Chromosome aberrations: clonal; Chromosomal aberrations: non-clonal; Interactions: Heat/Radiation/Drugs; Biochemical effects; Protein expression; Gene induction; Co-operative effects; ``Bystander'' effects; Oxidative stress effects; Recovery from radiation damage. DNA damage and repair -- DNA repair genes; DNA repair deficient diseases; DNA repair enzymology; Epigenetic effects on repair; and Ataxia and ATM.
Date: July 18, 1999
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The construction of a physical map for human chromosome 19

Description: Unlike a genetic map which provides information on the relative position of genes or markers based upon the frequency of genetic recombination, a physical map provides a topographical picture of DNA, i.e. distances in base pairs between landmarks. The landmarks may be genes, gene markers, anonymous sequences, or cloned DNA fragments. Perhaps the most useful type of physical map is one that consists of an overlapping set of cloned DNA fragments (contigs) that span the chromosome. Once genes are assigned to this contig map, sequencing of the genomic DNA can be prioritized to complete the most interesting regions first. While, in practice, complete coverage of a complex genome in recombinant clones may not be possible to achieve, many gaps in a clone map may be closed by using multiple cloning vectors or uncloned large DNA fragments such as those separated by electrophoretic methods. Human chromosome 19 contains about 60 million base pairs of DNA and represents about 2% of the haploid genome. Our initial interest in chromosome 19 originated from the presence of three DNA repair genes which we localized to a region of this chromosome. Our approach to constructing a physical map of human chromosome 19 involves four steps: building a foundation of overlapping cosmid contigs; bridging the gaps in the cosmid map with hybridization-based methods to walk onto DNA cloned in yeast and cosmids: orienting the contigs relative to each other and linking them to the cytological map; and coupling the contig map with the genetic map. The methods we use and the current status of the map are summarized in this report. 6 refs., 1 fig.
Date: November 5, 1990
Creator: Carrano, A.V.; Alleman, J.; Amemiya, C.; Ashworth, L.K.; Aslanidis, C.; Branscomb, E.W. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Box Canyon Model Watershed Project Annual Report 1997/1998.

Description: In 1997, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Box Canyon Watershed Project. This project will concentrate on watershed protection and enhancement from an upland perspective and will complement current instream restoration efforts implemented through the Kalispel Resident Fish Project. Primary focus of this project is the Cee Cee Ah Creek watershed due to its proximity to the Reservation, importance as a traditional fishery, and potential for bull trout and west-slope cutthroat trout recovery.
Date: January 1, 1998
Creator: Department, Kalispel Natural Resource
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Age changes in human bone: an overview

Description: The human skeleton steadily changes structure and mass during life because of a variety of internal and external factors. Extracellular substance and bone cells get old, characteristic structural remodeling occurs with age and these age-related changes are important in the discrimination between pathological and physiological changes. Perhaps 20 percent of the bone mass is lost between the fourth and the ninth decades, osteoblasts function less efficiently and gradual loss of bone substance is enhanced by delayed mineralization of an increased surface area of thin and relatively less active osteoid seams. After the fifth decade, osteoclasia and the number of Howship's lacunae increase, and with age, the number of large osteolytic osteocytes increases as the number of small osteocytes declines and empty osteocyte lacunae become more common. The result is greater liability to fracture and diminished healing or replacement of injured bone.
Date: December 3, 1977
Creator: Sharpe, W.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department