242 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Importance of systems biology in engineering microbes for biofuel production

Description: Microorganisms have been rich sources for natural products, some of which have found use as fuels, commodity chemicals, specialty chemicals, polymers, and drugs, to name a few. The recent interest in production of transportation fuels from renewable resources has catalyzed numerous research endeavors that focus on developing microbial systems for production of such natural products. Eliminating bottlenecks in microbial metabolic pathways and alleviating the stresses due to production of these chemicals are crucial in the generation of robust and efficient production hosts. The use of systems-level studies makes it possible to comprehensively understand the impact of pathway engineering within the context of the entire host metabolism, to diagnose stresses due to product synthesis, and provides the rationale to cost-effectively engineer optimal industrial microorganisms.
Date: December 2, 2009
Creator: Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Redding, Alyssa M.; Rutherford, Becky J. & Keasling, Jay D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Competitive repair by naturally dispersed repetitive DNA during non-allelic homologous recombination

Description: Genome rearrangements often result from non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between repetitive DNA elements dispersed throughout the genome. Here we systematically analyze NAHR between Ty retrotransposons using a genome-wide approach that exploits unique features of Saccharomyces cerevisiae purebred and Saccharomyces cerevisiae/Saccharomyces bayanus hybrid diploids. We find that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce NAHR-dependent rearrangements using Ty elements located 12 to 48 kilobases distal to the break site. This break-distal recombination (BDR) occurs frequently, even when allelic recombination can repair the break using the homolog. Robust BDR-dependent NAHR demonstrates that sequences very distal to DSBs can effectively compete with proximal sequences for repair of the break. In addition, our analysis of NAHR partner choice between Ty repeats shows that intrachromosomal Ty partners are preferred despite the abundance of potential interchromosomal Ty partners that share higher sequence identity. This competitive advantage of intrachromosomal Tys results from the relative efficiencies of different NAHR repair pathways. Finally, NAHR generates deleterious rearrangements more frequently when DSBs occur outside rather than within a Ty repeat. These findings yield insights into mechanisms of repeat-mediated genome rearrangements associated with evolution and cancer.
Date: August 27, 2010
Creator: Hoang, Margaret L.; Tan, Frederick J.; Lai, David C.; Celniker, Sue E.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Dunham, Maitreya J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of the Cobalamin and Fep Operons in Methylobium petrolphilum PM1

Description: The bacterium Methylobium petroleophilum PM1 is economically important due to its ability to degrade methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), a fuel additive. Because PM1 is a representative of all MTBE degraders, it is important to understand the transport pathways critical for the organism to survive in its particular environment. In this study, the cobalamin pathway and select iron transport genes will be characterized to help further understand all metabolic pathways in PM1. PM1 contains a total of four cobalamin operons. A single operon is located on the chromosome. Located on the megaplasmid are two tandem repeats of cob operons and a very close representative of the cob operon located on the chromosome. The fep operon, an iron transport mechanism, lies within the multiple copies of the cob operon. The cob operon and the fep operon appear to be unrelated except for a shared need for the T-on-B-dependent energy transduction complex to assist the operons in moving large molecules across the outer membrane of the cell. A genomic study of the cob and the fep operons with that of phylogenetically related organisms helped to confirm the identity of the cob and fep operons and to represent the pathways. More study of the pathways should be done to find the relationship that positions the two seemingly unrelated cob and fep genes together in what appears to be one operon.
Date: September 6, 2005
Creator: Ewing, J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Metagenomic Analysis of Microbial Symbionts in a Gutless Worm

Description: Symbioses between bacteria and eukaryotes are ubiquitous, yet our understanding of the interactions driving these associations is hampered by our inability to cultivate most host-associated microbes. Here we use a metagenomic approach to describe four co-occurring symbionts from the marine oligochaete Olavius algarvensis, a worm lacking a mouth, gut and nephridia. Shotgun sequencing and metabolic pathway reconstruction revealed that the symbionts are sulphur-oxidizing and sulphate-reducing bacteria, all of which are capable of carbon fixation, thus providing the host with multiple sources of nutrition. Molecular evidence for the uptake and recycling of worm waste products by the symbionts suggests how the worm could eliminate its excretory system, an adaptation unique among annelid worms. We propose a model that describes how the versatile metabolism within this symbiotic consortium provides the host with an optimal energy supply as it shuttles between the upper oxic and lower anoxic coastal sediments that it inhabits.
Date: May 1, 2006
Creator: Woyke, Tanja; Teeling, Hanno; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Hunteman, Marcel; Richter, Michael; Gloeckner, Frank Oliver et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BIOPAX REPORT SPRING 2007

Description: In July 2004, the Department of Energy (DOE) allocated funds in support of the development of A Data Exchange Format for Biological Pathway Databases (BioPAX). The primary objective of the BioPAX initiative is the development of a standard data exchange format for biological pathway data. This standard will significantly ease the analysis of biological pathways in the life sciences. Support from the DOE has enabled BioPAX to make significant progress towards its objective. We were able to build a very active community of pathway data and software tool providers. Work is continuing on the BioPAX standard with meetings, input and feedback provided for Level 3 of the standard and beyond.
Date: June 1, 2007
Creator: Sander, Chris
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Genomic islands predict functional adaptation in marine actinobacteria

Description: Linking functional traits to bacterial phylogeny remains a fundamental but elusive goal of microbial ecology 1. Without this information, it becomes impossible to resolve meaningful units of diversity and the mechanisms by which bacteria interact with each other and adapt to environmental change. Ecological adaptations among bacterial populations have been linked to genomic islands, strain-specific regions of DNA that house functionally adaptive traits 2. In the case of environmental bacteria, these traits are largely inferred from bioinformatic or gene expression analyses 2, thus leaving few examples in which the functions of island genes have been experimentally characterized. Here we report the complete genome sequences of Salinispora tropica and S. arenicola, the first cultured, obligate marine Actinobacteria 3. These two species inhabit benthic marine environments and dedicate 8-10percent of their genomes to the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Despite a close phylogenetic relationship, 25 of 37 secondary metabolic pathways are species-specific and located within 21 genomic islands, thus providing new evidence linking secondary metabolism to ecological adaptation. Species-specific differences are also observed in CRISPR sequences, suggesting that variations in phage immunity provide fitness advantages that contribute to the cosmopolitan distribution of S. arenicola 4. The two Salinispora genomes have evolved by complex processes that include the duplication and acquisition of secondary metabolite genes, the products of which provide immediate opportunities for molecular diversification and ecological adaptation. Evidence that secondary metabolic pathways are exchanged by Horizontal Gene Transfer (HGT) yet are fixed among globally distributed populations 5 supports a functional role for their products and suggests that pathway acquisition represents a previously unrecognized force driving bacterial diversification
Date: April 1, 2009
Creator: Penn, Kevin; Jenkins, Caroline; Nett, Markus; Udwary, Daniel; Gontang, Erin; McGlinchey, Ryan et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Invariability of Central Metabolic Flux Distribution in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Under Environmental or Genetic Perturbations

Description: An environmentally important bacterium with versatile respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, displayed significantly different growth rates under three culture conditions: minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 3 hrs), salt stressed minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 6 hrs), and minimal medium with amino acid supplementation (doubling time {approx}1.5 hrs). {sup 13}C-based metabolic flux analysis indicated that fluxes of central metabolic reactions remained relatively constant under the three growth conditions, which is in stark contrast to the reported significant changes in the transcript and metabolite profiles under various growth conditions. Furthermore, ten transposon mutants of S. oneidensis MR-1 were randomly chosen from a transposon library and their flux distributions through central metabolic pathways were revealed to be identical, even though such mutational processes altered the secondary metabolism, for example, glycine and C1 (5,10-Me-THF) metabolism.
Date: April 21, 2009
Creator: Tang, Yinjie; Martin, Hector Garcia; Deutschbauer, Adam; Feng, Xueyang; Huang, Rick; Llora, Xavier et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

Description: The availability of whole-cell level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30,000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy-tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations have relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reaction are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central-carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.
Date: January 20, 2007
Creator: Almaas, E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Symbiosis insights through metagenomic analysis of a microbialconsortium

Description: Symbioses between bacteria and eukaryotes are ubiquitous, yet our understanding of the interactions driving these associations is hampered by our inability to cultivate most host-associated microbes. Here, we used a metagenomic approach to describe four co-occurring symbionts from the marine oligochaete Olavius algarvensis, a worm lacking a mouth, gut, and nephridia. Shotgun sequencing and metabolic pathway reconstruction revealed that the symbionts are sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria, all of which are capable of carbon fixation, providing the host with multiple sources of nutrition. Molecular evidence for the uptake and recycling of worm waste products by the symbionts suggests how the worm could eliminate its excretory system, an adaptation unique among annelid worms. We propose a model which describes how the versatile metabolism within this symbiotic consortium provides the host with an optimal energy supply as it shuttles between the upper oxic and lower anoxic coastal sediments which it inhabits.
Date: September 1, 2006
Creator: Woyke, Tanja; Teeling, Hanno; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Hunteman,Marcel; Richter, Michael; Gloeckner, Frank Oliver et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A program to assess microbial impacts on nuclear waste containment

Description: In this paper we discuss aspects of a comprehensive program to identify and bound potential effects of microorganisms on long-term nuclear waste containment, using as examples, studies conducted within the Yucca Mountain Project. A comprehensive program has been formulated which cuts across standard disciplinary lines to address the specific concerns of microbial activity in a radioactive waste repository. Collectively, this program provides bounding parameters of microbial activities that modify the ambient geochemistry and hydrology, modify corrosion rates, and transport and transform radionuclides under conditions expected to be encountered after geological waste emplacement. This program is intended to provide microbial reaction rates and bounding conditions in a form that can be integrated into existing chemical and hydrological models. The inclusion of microbial effects will allow those models to more accurately assess long term repository integrity.
Date: February 20, 1996
Creator: Horn, J. & Meike, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Plant biochemistry course, 1993

Description: This paper provides a brief description of a summer lecture course on metabolic pathways and regulation of flow through these pathways in plants. Descriptions of the 1992 course held at La Jolla,Ca; 1993 course held in Madison, Wis, and plans for the 1994 course projected for East Lansing, MI.
Date: December 31, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Quarterly report of Biological and Medical Research Division, April 1955

Description: This report is a compilation of 48 investigator prepared summaries of recent progress in individual research programs of the Biology and Medical Division of the Argonne National Laboratory for the quarterly period ending April,1955. Individual reports are about 3-6 pages in length and often contain research data.
Date: April 1, 1955
Creator: Brues, A.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Regulation of terpene metabolism. Final technical report, March 15, 1988--March 14, 1996

Description: This research focuses on the following topics: the biosynthesis and catabolism of monoterpenes; the organization of monoterpene metabolism; the developmental regulation of monoterpene metabolism; the flux control of precursor supply; and the integration of monoterpene and higher terpenoid metabolism.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Croteau, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

Description: The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.
Date: December 31, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The role of purine degradation in methane biosynthesis and energy production in Methanococcus vannielii. Progress report

Description: Firstly, characterization of a purine degrading pathway in Methanococcus vannielii was determined. The pathway is similar to that described for Clostridia. The M. vannielli pathway differs in a few respects from the Clostridial pathway. The pathway of Clostridia uses tetrahydrofolic acid (THF), whereas the pathway of M. vannielii uses tetrahydromethanopterin (H{sub 4}MPt) as a cofactor in the transfer of both the formimino moiety of formiminoglycine and apparently in the cleavage of glycine by a glycin decarboxylase type mechanism that is dependent upon at least H{sub 4}MPt and either NAD{sup +} or NADP{sup +}. Secondly, the relationship of purine degradation to methanogenesis was investigated.
Date: November 1, 1998
Creator: DeMoll, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The nature and alternate rates of the ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) oxygenation intermediate

Description: Mutant ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) were employed to investigate the partitioning of carbon flow between photosynthesis or photorespiration. Previous functional and structural studies implicate active site Lys329 and Glu48 or R. rubrum RuBp in promoting addition of CO2 to the RuBP-enediol. Two novel O2-dependent side products generated by the K329A and E49Q mutants provided insight into RuBP oxygenase intermediate and roles of Lys329 and Glu48 in oxygenation.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Harpel, M.R.; Chen, Yuh-Ru & Hartman, F.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

Description: The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailed description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.
Date: November 10, 1995
Creator: Mullet, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Control of sugar transport and metabolism in Zymomonas mobilis. Final report

Description: This research deals with the physiology and genetics of sugar transport and metabolic control in Zymomonas mobilis. The specific objectives of the grant as as follows: First, the complex interactions of transcriptional, post-transcriptional and translational control mechanisms on regulation of the glf operon will be investigated. Second, the structure and function of the unique glucose facilitator will be examined by a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches, making use of the genetically reconstituted system in E. coli. Third, the possibility that physical association or indirect interactions between the glucose facilitator and glucokinase are involved in metabolic control will be analyzed. Fourth, the Z. mobilis glucose transport and phosphorylation system will be utilized to metabolically engineer recombinant E. coli with altered cell pool metabolite profiles. Work on the third and fourth objectives is complete, work on the first and second objectives is progressing nicely. Publication of this work has been admittedly slow, due primarily to a change n location of the research program from the University of Nebraska to The Ohio State University. However, it should be noted that much of the unpublished data outlined below represented completed studies, and are contained in graduate student theses which are being prepared for submission this summer. Since a full year remains in the current funding period, and the new laboratory is now up and running, we fully expect to make reasonable progress on the remaining objectives and to publish the results in a timely fashion.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Conway, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Defining interactions between DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4

Description: Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), ligase IV, and XRCC4 are all critical components of the NHEJ repair pathway. DNA-PK is composed of a heterodimeric DNA-binding component, Ku, and a large catalytic subunit, DNA-PKcs. Ligase IV and XRCC4 associate to form a multimeric complex that is also essential for NHEJ. DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4 interact at DNA termini which results in stimulated ligase activity. Here we define interactions between the components of these two essential complexes, DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4. We find that ligase IV/XRCC4 associates with DNA-PK in a DNA-independent manner. The specific protein-protein interactions that mediate the interaction between these two complexes are further identified. Direct physical interactions between ligase IV and Ku as well as between XRCC4 and DNA-PKcs are shown. No direct interactions are observed between ligase IV and DNA-PKcs or between XRCC4 and Ku. Our data defines the specific protein pairs involved in the association of DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4, and suggests a molecular mechanism for coordinating the assembly of the DNA repair complex at DNA breaks.
Date: April 10, 2001
Creator: Hsu, Hsin-Ling; Yannone, Steven M. & Chen, David J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Regulation of polyamine synthesis in plants. Annual progress report, July 1, 1992--June 30, 1993

Description: After isolation of a cDNA clone for the plant ARGdc, this research focused on unusual post-translational modifications occuring in a arginine decarboxylase cDNA clone in oats. A novel regulatory mechanism for polyamines was explored and an attempt was made to characterize it. A plant ornithine decarboxylase cDNA was identified in Arabidopsis. Further work remains on the mechanisms of polyamine regulation and function in plants.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Malmberg, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Regulation of polyamine synthesis in plants. Final progress report, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1994

Description: This research focused on unusual post-translational modifications occuring in a arginine decarboxylase cDNA clone in oats. A novel regulatory mechanism for polyamines was explored and an attempt was made to characterize it. A plant ornithine decarboxylase cDNA was identified in Arabidopsis. Further work remains on the mechanisms of polyamine regulation and function in plants.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Malmberg, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lethality in PARP-1/Ku80 double mutant mice reveals physiologicalsynergy during early embryogenesis

Description: Ku is an abundant heterodimeric nuclear protein, consisting of 70-kDa and 86-kDa tightly associated subunits that comprise the DNA binding component of DNA-dependent protein kinase. Poly(ADP)ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a 113-kDa protein that catalyzes the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) on target proteins. Both Ku and PARP-1 recognize and bind to DNA ends. Ku functions in the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway whereas PARP-1 functions in the single strand break repair and base excision repair (BER) pathways. Recent studies have revealed that PARP-1 and Ku80 interact in vitro. To determine whether the association of PARP-1 and Ku80 has any physiological significance or synergistic function in vivo, mice lacking both PARP-1 and Ku80 were generated. The resulting offspring died during embryonic development displaying abnormalities around the gastrulation stage. In addition, PARP-1-/-Ku80-/- cultured blastocysts had an increased level of apoptosis. These data suggest that the functions of both Ku80 and PARP-1 are essential for normal embryogenesis and that a loss of genomic integrity leading to cell death through apoptosis is likely the cause of the embryonic lethality observed in these mice.
Date: September 24, 2002
Creator: Henrie, Melinda S.; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Burma, Sandeep; Menissier-de Murcia, Josiane; de Murcia, Gilbert; Li, Gloria C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department