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Results of The Excreta Bioassay Quality Control Program For April 1, 2010 Through March 31, 2011

Description: A total of 76 urine samples and 10 spiked fecal samples were submitted during the report period (April 1, 2010 through March 31, 2011) to GEL Laboratories, LLC in South Carolina by the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (IDP) to check the accuracy, precision, and detection levels of their analyses. Urine analyses for 14C, Sr, for 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 243Am, 235U, 238U, 238U-mass and fecal analyses for 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu were tested this year. The number of QC urine samples submitted during the report period represented 1.1% of the total samples submitted. In addition to the samples provided by IDP, GEL was also required to conduct their own QC program, and submit the results of analyses to IDP. About 31% of the analyses processed by GEL during the first year of contract 112512 were quality control samples. GEL tested the performance of 23 radioisotopes, all of which met or exceeded the specifications in the Statement of Work within statistical uncertainty except the slightly elevated relative bias for 243,244Cm (Table 4).
Date: July 19, 2012
Creator: Antonio, Cheryl L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of the Excreta Bioassay Quality Control Program for April 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010

Description: A total of 58 urine samples and 10 fecal samples were submitted during the report period (April 1, 2009 through March 31, 2010) to General Engineering Laboratories, South Carolina by the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (IDP) to check the accuracy, precision, and detection levels of their analyses. Urine analyses for Sr, 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 243Am 235U, 238U, elemental uranium and fecal analyses for 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu were tested this year as well as four tissue samples for 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am and 241Pu. The number of QC urine samples submitted during the report period represented 1.3% of the total samples submitted. In addition to the samples provided by IDP, GEL was also required to conduct their own QC program, and submit the results of analyses to IDP. About 33% of the analyses processed by GEL during the third year of this contract were quality control samples. GEL tested the performance of 21 radioisotopes, all of which met or exceeded the specifications in the Statement of Work within statistical uncertainty (Table 4).
Date: July 19, 2012
Creator: Antonio, Cheryl L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of The Excreta Bioassay Quality Control Program For April 1, 2008 through March 31, 2009

Description: A total of 62 urine samples and 6 spiked fecal samples were submitted during the report period (April 1, 2008 through March 31, 2009) to General Engineering Laboratories, South Carolina by the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (IDP) to check the accuracy, precision, and detection levels of their analyses. Urine analyses for Sr, 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 243Am 235U, 238U, elemental uranium and fecal analyses for 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu were tested this year. The number of QC urine samples submitted during the report period represented 1.3% of the total samples submitted. In addition to the samples provided by IDP, GEL was also required to conduct their own QC program, and submit the results of analyses to IDP. About 34% of the analyses processed by GEL during the third year of this contract were quality control samples. GEL tested the performance of 21 radioisotopes, all of which met or exceeded the specifications in the Statement of Work within statistical uncertainty. IDP concluded that GEL was performing well for all analyses tested, and concerns identified earlier were satisfactorily resolved (see section on Follow-up on Concerns During the Fourth Contract Year).
Date: June 1, 2010
Creator: Antonio, Cheryl L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR UO3 PLANT BIOASSAY

Description: Alternative urine bioassay programs are described for application with decontamination and decommissioning activities at the Hanford UO3 Plant. The alternatives are based on quarterly or monthly urine bioassay for recycled uranium, assuming multiple acute inhalation intakes of recycled uranium occurring over a year. The inhalations are assumed to be 5µm AMAD particles of 80% absorption type F and 20% absorption type M. Screening levels, expressed as daily uranium mass excretion rates in urine, and the actions associated with these levels are provided for both quarterly and monthly sampling frequencies.
Date: July 12, 2010
Creator: Carbaugh, Eugene H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In Vivo Monitoring Program Manual, PNL-MA-574, Rev 5.1

Description: The following sections provide an overview of the administration for the In Vivo Monitoring Program (IVMP) for Hanford. This includes the organizational structure and program responsibilities; coordination of in vivo measurements; scheduling measurements; performing measurements; reporting results; and quality assurance.
Date: September 12, 2011
Creator: Lynch, Timothy P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Methods and Models of the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, PNNL-MA-860

Description: The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (HIDP) provides internal dosimetry support services for operations at the Hanford Site. The HIDP is staffed and managed by the Radiation and Health Technology group, within the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Operations supported by the HIDP include research and development, the decontamination and decommissioning of facilities formerly used to produce and purify plutonium, and waste management activities. Radioelements of particular interest are plutonium, uranium, americium, tritium, and the fission and activation product radionuclides 137Cs, 90Sr, and 60Co. This manual describes the technical basis for the design of the routine bioassay monitoring program and for assessment of internal dose. The purposes of the manual are as follows: • Provide assurance that the HIDP derives from a sound technical base. • Promote the consistency and continuity of routine program activities. • Provide a historical record. • Serve as a technical reference for radiation protection personnel. • Aid in identifying and planning for future needs.
Date: September 30, 2009
Creator: Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Bihl, Donald E.; Maclellan, Jay A.; Antonio, Cheryl L. & Hill, Robin L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of the Excreta Bioassay Quality Control Program For April 1, 2006 Through March 31, 2007

Description: A total of 66 urine samples, 6 blank fecal and 6 spiked artificial fecal samples were submitted during the report period (April 1, 2006 through March 31, 2007) to General Engineering Laboratories, South Carolina by the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (IDP) to check the accuracy, precision, and detection levels of their analyses. Urine analyses for tritium, Sr, 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 243Am 235U, 238U, elemental uranium and fecal analyses for 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu were tested this year. The number of QC urine samples submitted during the report period represented 1.7% of the total samples submitted. In addition to the samples provided by IDP, GEL was also required to conduct their own QC program, and submit the results of analyses to IDP. About 36% of the analyses processed by GEL during the second year of this contract were quality control samples. GEL tested the performance of 16 radioisotopes, all of which met or exceeded the specifications in the Statement of Work. IDP concluded that GEL was performing well for all analyses tested, and concerns identified earlier were satisfactorily resolved.
Date: February 19, 2008
Creator: Antonio, Cheryl L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results Of The Excreta Bioassay Quality Control Program For April 1, 2007 Through March 31, 2008

Description: A total of 79 urine samples, 3 blank fecal and 5 spiked artificial fecal samples were submitted during the report period (April 1, 2007 through March 31, 2008) to General Engineering Laboratories, South Carolina by the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (IDP) to check the accuracy, precision, and detection levels of their analyses. Urine analyses for tritium, Sr, 238Pu, 239Pu, 241Am, 243Am 235U, 238U, elemental uranium and fecal analyses for 241Am, 238Pu and 239Pu were tested this year. The number of QC urine samples submitted during the report period represented 1.8% of the total samples submitted. In addition to the samples provided by IDP, GEL was also required to conduct their own QC program, and submit the results of analyses to IDP. About 35% of the analyses processed by GEL during the third year of this contract were quality control samples. GEL tested the performance of 24 radioisotopes, all of which met or exceeded the specifications in the Statement of Work within statistical uncertainty (Table 4). IDP concluded that GEL was performing well for all analyses tested, and concerns identified earlier were satisfactorily resolved.
Date: December 31, 2008
Creator: Antonio, Cheryl L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program Manual, PNL-MA-552

Description: This manual is a guide to the services provided by the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (IDP), which is operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.( ) for the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office, Office of River Protection and their Hanford Site contractors. The manual describes the roles of and relationships between the IDP and the radiation protection programs of the Hanford Site contractors. Recommendations and guidance are also provided for consideration in implementing bioassay monitoring and internal dosimetry elements of radiation protection programs.
Date: September 24, 2009
Creator: Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Bihl, Donald E. & Maclellan, Jay A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calibration of the Accuscan II In Vivo System for I-125 Thyroid Counting

Description: This report describes the March 2011 calibration of the Accuscan II HpGe In Vivo system for I-125 thyroid counting. The source used for the calibration was a DOE manufactured Am-241/Eu-152 source contained in a 22 ml vial BEA Am-241/Eu-152 RMC II-1 with energies from 26 keV to 344 keV. The center of the detector housing was positioned 64 inches from the vault floor. This position places the approximate center line of the detector housing at the center line of the source in the phantom thyroid tube. The energy and efficiency calibration were performed using an RMC II phantom (Appendix J). Performance testing was conducted using source BEA Am-241/Eu-152 RMC II-1 and Validation testing was performed using an I-125 source in a 30 ml vial (I-125 BEA Thyroid 002) and an ANSI N44.3 phantom (Appendix I). This report includes an overview introduction and records for the energy/FWHM and efficiency calibration including performance verification and validation counting. The Accuscan II system was successfully calibrated for counting the thyroid for I-125 and verified in accordance with ANSI/HPS N13.30-1996 criteria.
Date: July 1, 2011
Creator: Perry, Ovard R. & Georgeson, David L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calibration of the Accuscan II In Vivo System for I-131 Thyroid Counting

Description: This report describes the March 2011 calibration of the Accuscan II HpGe In Vivo system for I-131 thyroid counting. The source used for the calibration was an Analytics mixed gamma source 82834-121 distributed in an epoxy matrix in a Wheaton Liquid Scintillation Vial with energies from 88.0 keV to 1836.1 keV. The center of the detectors was position 64-feet from the vault floor. This position places the approximate center line of the detectors at the center line of the source in the thyroid tube. The calibration was performed using an RMC II phantom (Appendix J). Validation testing was performed using a Ba-133 source and an ANSI N44.3 Phantom (Appendix I). This report includes an overview introduction and records for the energy/FWHM and efficiency calibrations including verification counting. The Accuscan II system was successfully calibrated for counting the thyroid for I-131 and verified in accordance with ANSI/HPS N13.30-1996 criteria.
Date: July 1, 2011
Creator: Perry, Orval R. & Georgeson, David L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calibration of the Accuscan II In Vivo System for Whole Body Counting

Description: This report describes the April 2011 calibration of the Accuscan II HpGe In Vivo system for whole body counting. The source used for the calibration was a NIST traceable BOMAB manufactured by DOE as INL2006 BOMAB containing Eu-154, Eu-155, Eu-152, Sb-125 and Y-88 with energies from 27 keV to 1836 keV with a reference date of 11/29/2006. The actual usable energy range was 86.5 keV to 1597 keV on 4/21/2011. The BOMAB was constructed inside the Accuscan II counting 'tub' in the order of legs, thighs, abdomen, thorax/arms, neck, and head. Each piece was taped to the backwall of the counter. The arms were taped to the thorax. The phantom was constructed between the v-ridges on the backwall of the Accuscan II counter. The energy and efficiency calibrations were performed using the INL2006 BOMAB. The calibrations were performed with the detectors in the scanning mode. This report includes an overview introduction and records for the energy/FWHM and efficiency calibration including performance verification and validation counting. The Accuscan II system was successfully calibrated for whole body counting and verified in accordance with ANSI/HPS N13.30-1996 criteria.
Date: August 1, 2011
Creator: Perry, Orval R. & Georgeson, David L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

Description: Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.
Date: September 22, 2008
Creator: Vormelker, P
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tolerance of selected fish species to atmospheric gas supersaturation

Description: Several fish species were collected in SE Washington, acclimated to 2O deg C and 100 to 150% gas supersaturation, and exposed to high-gas-content waters (100 to 140% supersaturation) at 20 deg C under standard acute bioassay conditions. The flsh were monitored to determine death time and necropsied to determine the cause of death. The species exhibited a differential tolerance to high gas levels with smallmouth bass more tolerant and salmonids less tolerant. Nearly all fish that died during the test exhibited signs of gas bubble disease, ranging from massive heart embolism to mild subepidermal emphysema. These signs were related to exposure time and to gas supersaturation levels. Gas concentrations were monitored by molecular sieve gas chromatography. (auth)
Date: January 1, 1973
Creator: Fickeisen, D.H.; Montgomery, J.C. & Schneider, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and testing of biosensors that quantitatively and specifically detect organic contaminants

Description: This is the final report of a two-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project sought to develop a more sensitive and less expensive method of detecting organic contaminants. Assaying complex environmental samples for organic contaminant content is costly and labor intensive. This often limits extensive testing. Sensitive microbial biosensors that detect specific organic contaminants in complex waste mixtures without prior separation from other waste components have been developed. Some soil microbes degrade organic compounds that contaminate the environment. These bacteria sense minute quantities of particular organic compounds then respond by activating genes encoding enzymes that degrade these molecules. Genetic manipulation of these gene regulatory processes has been employed to develop unique biosensors that detect specific organic compounds using standard biochemical assays. Such biosensors allow rapid, sensitive testing of environmental samples for selected organic contaminants. The cost of biosensor assays is at least 100-fold less than present methods, allowing more rapid and extensive testing and site characterization.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Jackson, P.; Keim, P.; Kuske, C. & Willardson, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Simple, Inexpensive in Situ Method for Assessing Acute Toxicity of Effluents to Fish

Description: Test chambers for conducting in situ fish bioassays were constructed from 8L polyethylene bottles. Yearling fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and young-of-the-year bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) demonstrated greater than 50 percent survival in the chambers after 65 days of exposure in a reservoir, river, and creek. Fathead minnow survival was substantially greater than that of bluegills. The chambers provide a simple, inexpensive, sensitive technique to screen effluents for toxicity.
Date: May 29, 2001
Creator: Wilde, E.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aequorin as a bioluminescent indicator for use in the determination of biomolecules in single cells. Final technical report

Description: During this funding period, the laboratories of Drs. Anderson and Daunert have performed a considerable amount of work toward addressing the issues associated with small volume analysis necessary for single cell studies. In that respect, their research has been focused on (1) developing new assays that can be miniaturized and are suitable for small volume and single cell analysis; (2) fabricating pL-vials that simulate the volume of single cells and setting up instrumentation capable of low-volume detection; (3) developing reproducible and reliable microinjection techniques; (4) developing methods of analysis for biomolecules in the pL-vials and employing these assays in the detection of biomolecules in single cells. The accomplishments attained in all these areas are described below. A total of 24 publications and 35 presentations have resulted from this work.
Date: February 17, 2000
Creator: Daunert, Sylvia
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Y-12 Uranium Exposure Study

Description: Following the recent restart of operations at the Y-12 Plant, the Radiological Control Organization (RCO) observed that the enriched uranium exposures appeared to involve insoluble rather than soluble uranium that presumably characterized most earlier Y-12 operations. These observations necessitated changes in the bioassay program, particularly the need for routine fecal sampling. In addition, it was not reasonable to interpret the bioassay data using metabolic parameter values established during earlier Y-12 operations. Thus, the recent urinary and fecal bioassay data were interpreted using the default guidance in Publication 54 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP); that is, inhalation of Class Y uranium with an activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 1 {micro}m. Faced with apparently new workplace conditions, these actions were appropriate and ensured a cautionary approach to worker protection. As additional bioassay data were accumulated, it became apparent that the data were not consistent with Publication 54. Therefore, this study was undertaken to examine the situation.
Date: August 5, 1999
Creator: Eckerman, K.F. & Kerr, G.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development, Validation, and Evaluation of a Continuous, Real-time, Bivalve Biomonitoring System

Description: A biological monitoring tool to assess water quality using bivalve gape behavior was developed and demonstrated. The purpose of this work was to develop methodologies for screening water quality appropriate to the goals of the watershed paradigm. A model of bivalve gape behavior based on prediction of behavior using autoregressive techniques was the foundation of the bivalve biomonitoring system. Current technology was used in developing the system to provide bivalve gape state data in a continuous real-time manner. A laboratory version of the system, including data collection and analysis hardware and software, was developed for use as a toxicological assay for determination of effective concentrations of toxicant(s) or other types of stress on bivalve gape behavior. Corbicula fluminea was monitored and challenged with copper, zinc, and chlorpyrifos using the system. Effective concentrations of 176±23µg/L copper, 768±412µg/L zinc, and 68µg/L chlorpyrifos were observed using a natural water with high dissolved organic carbon concentrations. A rugged field version of the bivalve biomonitoring system was developed and deployed in two locations. The field systems were fitted with a photovoltaic array, a single board computer, and a CDPD telemetry modem for robust remote operation. Data were telemetered at a time relevant rate of once every ten minutes. One unit was deployed in Lake Lewisville, Denton County, TX in February 2000. Data were telemetered and archived at a 92% success rate. Bivalve gape data demonstrated significant behavioral deviations on average 5 times per month. A second unit was deployed in Pecan Creek, Denton, TX in June 2001. Data from this site were telemetered and archived at a 96% success rate. Over the months of June-August 2001, 16 significant behavioral deviations were observed, 63% of which were correlated with changes in physical/chemical parameters. This work demonstrated the relative sensitivity of bivalve gape as a toxicological endpoint ...
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Date: December 2002
Creator: Allen, H. Joel
Partner: UNT Libraries

Status of solid-phase enzyme immunoassays

Description: Solid-phase enzyme immunoassays are becoming increasingly popular due to their sensitivity, simplicity, and versatility. The three most common types of these assays (indirect, double-antibody, and competitive binding) have been described and examples given of their use. Short discussions of various aspects of the ''art'' of performing solid-phase EIAs have been included. Finally, a brief overview of the Technicon automated EIA processor has been presented.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Saunders, G.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Issues in weighting bioassay data for use in regressions for internal dose assessments

Description: For use of bioassay data in internal dose assessment, research should be done to clarify the goal desired, the choice of method to achieve the goal, the selection of adjustable parameters, and on the ensemble of information that is available. Understanding of these issues should determine choices of weighting factors for bioassay data used in regression models. This paper provides an assessment of the relative importance of the various factors.
Date: November 1, 1992
Creator: Strom, D. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Toxicity Bioassays for Ecological Risk Assessment in Arid and Semiarid Ecosystems. Reviews Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 168:43-98.

Description: This paper discusses current limitations for performing ecological risk assessments in dry environments (i.e., ecosystems that are characteristic of many DOE Facilities) and presents novel approaches to addressing ecological risk in such systems.
Date: February 2001
Creator: Markwiese, J. T.; Ryti, R. T.; Hooten, M. M.; Michael, D. I. & Hlohowskyj, I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program Manual, PNL-MA-552

Description: This manual is a guide to the services provided by the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program (IDP). It describes the roles of and relationships between the IDP and site contractors, and provides recommendations and guidance for consideration in implementing bioassay monitoring and internal dosimetry elements of radiation protection programs. Guidance includes identifying conditions under which workers should be placed on bioassay programs, types, descritptions, and capabilities of measurements, suggested routine bioassay programs, limitations on services, and practices for recording and reporting results.
Date: October 10, 2003
Creator: Carbaugh, Eugene H.; Bihl, Donald E. & Maclellan, Jay A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department