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Study of Reservoir Heterogencities and Structural Features Affecting Production in the Shallow Oil Zone, Eastern Elk Hills Area, California

Description: Late Neogene (Plio-Pleistocene) shallow marine strata of the western Bakersfield Arch and Elk Hills produce hydrocarbons from several different reservoirs. This project focuses on the shallow marine deposits of the Gusher and Calitroleum reservoirs in the Lower Shallow Oil Zone (LSOZ). In the eastern part of the study area on the Bakersfield Arch at North and South Coles Levee field and in two wells in easternmost Elk Hills, the LSOZ reservoirs produce dry (predominantly methane) gas. In structurally higher locations in western Elk Hills, the LSOZ produces oil and associated gas. Gas analyses show that gas from the eastern LSOZ is bacterial and formed in place in the reservoirs, whereas gas associated with oil in the western part of the study area is thermogenic and migrated into the sands from deeper in the basin. Regional mapping shows that the gas-bearing LSOZ sands in the Coles Levee and easternmost Elk Hills area are sourced from the Sierra Nevada to the east whereas the oil-bearing sands in western Elk Hills appear to be sourced from the west. The eastern Elk Hills area occupied the basin depocenter, farthest from either source area. As a result, it collected mainly low-permeability offshore shale deposits. This sand-poor depocenter provides an effective barrier to the updip migration of gases from east to west. The role of small, listric normal faults as migration barriers is more ambiguous. Because our gas analyses show that the gas in the eastern LSOZ reservoirs is bacterial, it likely formed in-place near the reservoirs and did not have to migrate far. Therefore, the gas could have been generated after faulting and accumulated within the fault blocks as localized pools. However, bacterial gas is present in both the eastern AND western parts of Elk Hills in the Dry Gas Zone (DGZ) near the top ...
Date: November 1, 2004
Creator: Gillespie, Janice
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dynamics of Crust Dissolution and Gas Release in Tank 241-SY-101

Description: Due primarily to an increase in floating crust thickness, the waste level in Tank 241-SY-101 has grown appreciably and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a potential hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from the nonconvective layer at the bottom of the tank, SY-101 will be diluted to dissolve a large fraction of the solids that allow the waste to retain gas. The plan is to transfer some waste out and back-dilute with water in several steps. In this work, mechanisms and rates of waste solids dissolution and gas releases are evaluated theoretically and experimentally. Particular emphasis is given to crust dissolution processes and associated gas releases, although dissolution and gas release from the mixed-slurry and nonconvective layers are also considered. The release of hydrogen gas to the tank domespace is modeled for a number of scenarios. Under the tank conditions expected at the time of back-dilution, no plausible continuous or sudden gas release scenarios resulting in flammable hydrogen concentrations were identified.
Date: January 24, 2000
Creator: Rassat, Scot D.; Stewart, Charles W.; Wells, Beric E.; Kuhn, William L.; Antoniak, Zenen I.; Cuta, Judith M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF GAS-LIQUID CYLINDRICAL CYCLONE COMPACT SEPARATORS FOR THREE-PHASE FLOW

Description: The objective of this five-year project (October, 1997-September, 2002) is to expand the current research activities of Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) to multiphase oil/water/gas separation. This project will be executed in two phases. Phase I (1997-2000) will focus on the investigations of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow behavior in a three-phase Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC{copyright}) Separator. The activities of this phase will include the development of a mechanistic model, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator, and detailed experimentation on the three-phase GLCC{copyright}. The experimental and CFD simulation results will be suitably integrated with the mechanistic model. In Phase II (2000-2002), the developed GLCC{copyright} separator will be tested under high pressure and real crudes conditions. This is crucial for validating the GLCC{copyright} design for field application and facilitating easy and rapid technology deployment. Design criteria for industrial applications will be developed based on these results and will be incorporated into the mechanistic model by TUSTP. This report presents a brief overview of the activities and tasks accomplished during the first half year (October 1, 1999-March 31, 2000) of the budget period (October 1, 1999-September 30, 2000). The total tasks of the budget period are given initially, followed by the technical and scientific results achieved till date. The report concludes with a detailed description of the plans for the conduct of the project for the second half year (April 1, 2000-September 30, 2000) of the current budget period.
Date: April 28, 2000
Creator: Mohan, Dr. Ram S. & Shoham, Dr. Ovadia
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preparation of Northern Mid-Continent Petroleum Atlas

Description: This report covers the fourth year of the Digital Petroleum Atlas (DPA) Project. The DPA is a longterm effort to develop a new methodology for efficient and timely access to the latest petroleum data and technology for the domestic oil and gas industry, research organizations and local governmental units. The DPA is a new and evolving approach to generating and publishing petroleum reservoir, field, play and basin studies.
Date: February 24, 2003
Creator: Gerhard, Lee C.; Carr, Timothy R. & Watney, W. Lynn
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF GAS-LIQUID CYLINDRICAL CYCLONE COMPACT SEPARATORS FOR THREE-PHASE FLOW

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded a five-year (1997-2002) grant (Mohan and Shoham, DE-FG26-97BC15024, 1997) to The University of Tulsa, to develop compact multiphase separation components for 3-phase flow. The research activities of this project have been conducted through cost sharing by the member companies of the Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) research consortium and the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology (OCAST). As part of this project, several individual compact separation components have been developed for onshore and offshore applications. These include gas-liquid cylindrical cyclones (GLCC{copyright}), liquid-liquid cylindrical cyclones (LLCC{copyright}), and the gas-liquid-liquid cylindrical cyclones (GLLCC{copyright}). A detailed study has also been completed for the liquid-liquid hydrocyclones (LLHC). Appropriate control strategies have been developed for proper operation of the GLCC{copyright} and LLCC{copyright}. Testing of GLCC{copyright} at high pressure and real crude conditions for field applications is also completed. Limited studies have been conducted on flow conditioning devices to be used upstream of the compact separators for performance improvement. This report presents a brief overview of the activities and tasks accomplished during the 5-year project period, October 1, 1997-March 31, 2003 (including the no-cost extended period of 6 months). An executive summary is presented initially followed by the tasks of the 5-year budget periods. Then, detailed description of the experimental and modeling investigations are presented. Subsequently, the technical and scientific results of the activities of this project period are presented with some discussions. The findings of this investigation are summarized in the ''Conclusions'' section, followed by relevant references. The publications resulting from this study in the form of MS Theses, Ph.D. Dissertation, Journal Papers and Conference Presentations are provided at the end of this report.
Date: June 25, 2003
Creator: Mohan, Dr. Ram S. & Shoham, Dr. Ovadia
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design and Development of Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone Compact Separators for Three-Phase Flow

Description: The objective of this five-year project (October 1997 - September 2002) was to expand the current research activities of Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) to multiphase oil/water/gas separation. This project was executed in two phases. Phase I (1997 - 2000) focused on the investigations of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow behavior in a three-phase Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) Separator. The activities of this phase included the development of a mechanistic model, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator, and detailed experimentation on the three-phase GLCC. The experimental and CFD simulation results will be suitably integrated with the mechanistic model. In Phase II (2000 - 2002), the developed GLCC separator will be tested under high pressure and real crude conditions. This is crucial for validating the GLCC design for field application and facilitating easy and rapid technology deployment. Design criteria for industrial applications will be developed based on these results and will be incorporated into the mechanistic model by TUSTP.
Date: January 18, 2001
Creator: Mohan, R.S. & Shoham, O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a Small-Scale Natural Gas Liquefier. Final Report

Description: This final report describes the progress during the contract period March 1, 1998 through April 30, 2003, on the design, development, and testing of a novel mixed-refrigerant-based 1000 gal/day natural gas liquefier, together with the associated gas cleanup equipment. Based on the work, it is concluded that a cost-effective 1000 gal/day liquefaction system is technically and economically feasible. A unit based on the same developed technology, with 5000 gal/day capacity, would have much improved economics.
Date: April 30, 2003
Creator: Kountz, K.; Kriha, K.; Liss, W.; Perry, M.; Richards, M. & Zuckerman, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

Description: West Carney Field produces from Hunton Formation. All the wells produce oil, water and gas. The main objective of this study is to understand the unique behavior observed in the field. We would also like to extend the analysis to other similar fields. This report specifically addresses two issues relevant to our understanding of the West Carney reservoir. In the first part, we discuss our efforts to develop the geological model which can help us understand how the depositional environment affects the producing behavior. In the previous Budget Period, we described fourteen cores. In this report, we present preliminary analysis of several additional cores and conodont work. Based on the additional data collected, it is clear that the earlier geological model is simplified and needs to be updated. The complexity in geological environment can explain some of the unusual behavior observed in the field production. The second issue deals with how to develop a model for gauging a potential success of a dewatering project. We have a developed hypothesis regarding what makes it successful, however, we need to test it against the available data. We have started collecting data from other fields producing from Hunton formation so that we can test this hypothesis. In this report, we provide the details of our effort to collect additional information.
Date: July 1, 2003
Creator: Kelkar, Mohan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

IMPROVED MISCIBLE NITROGEN FLOOD PERFORMANCE UTILIZING ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND HORIZONTAL LATERALS IN A CLASS I RESERVOIR - EAST BINGER (MARCHAND) UNIT

Description: The first horizontal well ever in the Marchand sandstone has been drilled. Although major difficulties arose with certain aspects of the drilling operation, a horizontal section of approximately 1300 was drilled. The section was left open hole as planned. The shales just above and between the Marchand sands appear to be very water-sensitive, requiring careful drilling practices. These shales were encountered in the middle part of the curve (45{sup o}-60{sup o}), which can be the most difficult part of a directional well to clean. Difficulties with these shales and cleaning this section led to a parted drill string, requiring a sidetrack. There were no major geologic ''surprises'', such as formation tops coming in much shallower or deeper than expected, or unexpected faults. Thin kaolinite beds were encountered in the horizontal section of the well. Previous descriptions of the mineralogy of this formation did not mention any kaolinite. The lateral extent of these beds is unknown. Completion of the well is under way. One additional injection profile was gathered during the quarter. Results are consistent with other recently profiles that show gas within the C Sand is overriding the oil and failing to sweep the deeper parts of the reservoir. International Reservoir Technologies, Inc. has completed the construction of the pilot area reservoir simulation model and the updating of historical production and injection data. They have begun fine-tuning the history match to better match production data and recently acquired pressure and profile data.
Date: August 10, 2001
Creator: Sinner, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Phase II Interim Report -- Assessment of Hydrocarbon Seepage Detection Methods on the Fort Peck Reservation, Northeast Montana

Description: The following work was performed: (1) collected reconnaissance micro-magnetic data and background field data for Area 1, (2) identified and collected soil sample data in three anomalous regions of Area 1, (3) sampled soils in Northwest Poplar Oil Field, (4) graphed, mapped, and interpreted all data areas listed above, (5) registered for the AAPG Penrose Conference on Hydrocarbon Seepage Mechanisms and Migration (postponed from 9/16/01 until 4/7/02 in Vancouver, B.C.). Results include the identification and confirmation of an oil and gas prospect in the northwest part of Area 1 and the verification of a potential shallow gas prospect in the West Poplar Area. Correlation of hydrocarbon micro-seepage to TM tonal anomalies needs further data analysis.
Date: April 24, 2002
Creator: Monson, Lawrence M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development

Description: A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.
Date: November 28, 2006
Creator: Turner, Bill
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Exploitation and Optimization of Reservoir Performance in Hunton Formation, Oklahoma

Description: West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we continue to describe the use of surfactant to alter the wettability of the rock. By altering the wettability, we may be able to recover additional oil through imbibition and gravity drainage process. In our Engineering and Geological Analysis section, we present a new technique to generate alternate permeability distributions at unsampled wells.
Date: January 1, 2006
Creator: Kelkar, Mohan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF GAS-LIQUID CYLINDRICAL CYCLONE COMPACT SEPARATORS FOR THREE-PHASE FLOW

Description: This report presents a brief overview of the activities and tasks accomplished during the second half year (April 1, 2001-September 30, 2001) of the fourth project year budget period (October 1, 2000-September 30, 2001). An executive summary is presented initially followed by the tasks of the current budget period. Then, detailed description of the experimental and modeling investigations are presented. Subsequently, the technical and scientific results of the activities of this project period are presented with some discussions. The findings of this investigation are summarized in the ''Conclusions'' section followed by relevant references. The fourth project year activities are divided into three main parts, which are carried out in parallel. The first part is continuation of the experimental program that includes a study of the oil/water two-phase behavior at high pressures and control system development for the three-phase GLCC{copyright}. This investigation will be eventually extended for three-phase flow. The second part consists of the development of a simplified mechanistic model incorporating the experimental results and behavior of dispersion of oil in water and water in oil. This will provide an insight into the hydrodynamic flow behavior and serve as the design tool for the industry. Although useful for sizing GLCC{copyright} for proven applications, the mechanistic model will not provide detailed hydrodynamic flow behavior information needed to screen new geometric variations or to study the effect of fluid property variations. Therefore, in the third part, the more rigorous approach of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) will be utilized. Multidimensional multiphase flow simulation at high pressures and for real crude conditions will provide much greater depth into the understanding of the physical phenomena and the mathematical analysis of three-phase GLCC{copyright} design and performance.
Date: October 30, 2001
Creator: Mohan, Dr. Ram S. & Shoham, Dr. Ovadia
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of Strategic Petroleum Reserve bubble point pressure data

Description: Mathematical models are presented to predict the bubble pressure for 481 cavern oil samples withdrawn from the Bryan Mound, West Hackberry, Big Hill, and Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites. The predicted bubble point pressure is compared to experimentally measured bubble point pressure to resolve potential sources of error introduced to the experimental analysis. In order to gain a higher level of confidence in the measurement of the bubble point pressure, a stochastic analysis of the data is recommended in the future.
Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: Lott, S.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The utilization of the microflora indigenous to and present in oil-bearing formations to selectively plug the more porous zones thereby increasing oil recovery during waterflooding. Sixteenth quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997

Description: There are ten injection wells receiving nutrients and twenty producing wells in test patterns are being monitoring for responses. Petrophysical studies of recovered core sample from the 3 newly drilled wells are still in progress. Monthly collection of produced fluids from the test and control wells in all patterns continued with the following tasks being performed: aliphatic profile (gas chromatographic analysis); API gravity and absolute viscosity under reservoir temperature; pH of produced water; surface tension (ST) of produced water (water-air); interfacial tension (IFT) for produced oil-water system; microbiological population; and inorganic analyses (nitrate, phosphate, sulfate, sulfide, chloride, potassium, and hardness). Production data on all wells in all patterns continues to be evaluated. Increased gas production that has been noted in some wells could be the result of microbial activity or from previous unswept areas of the reservoir. Samples of gas were collected from selected production wells and analyzed by gas chromatography using a Fisher Model No. 12 Gas Partitioner. The results of analyses from four sets of samples are given.
Date: January 20, 1998
Creator: Brown, L. R. & Vadie, A. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design and Development of Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone Compact Separators for Three-Phase Flow

Description: The objective of this five-year project (October 1997--September 2002) was to expand the current research activities of Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) to multiphase oil/water/gas separation. This project was executed in two phases. Phase I (1997--2000) focused on the investigations of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow behavior in a three-phase Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) Separator. The activities of this phase included the development of a mechanistic model, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator, and detailed experimentation on the three-phase GLCC. The experimental and CFD simulation results will be suitably integrated with the mechanistic model. In Phase II (2000--2002), the developed GLCC separator will be tested under high pressure and real crude conditions. This is crucial for validating the GLCC design for field application and facilitating easy and rapid technology deployment. Design criteria for industrial applications will be developed based on these results and will be incorporated into the mechanistic model by TUSTP.
Date: January 10, 2001
Creator: Mohan, R.S. & Shoham, O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Study of the Potential Impact of Gamma-Induced Radiolytic Gases on Loading of Cesium Onto Crystalline Silicotitanate Sorbent at ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor

Description: The use of an engineered form of crystalline silicotitanate as a potential sorbent for the removal and concentration of cesium from the high-level waste at the Savannah River Site was investigated. Results conclusively showed this sorbent to be unaffected by gamma-induced radiolytic gas formation during column loading. Closely controlled column-loading experiments were performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in a gamma field with a conservative dose rate expected to exceed that in a full-scale column by a factor of nearly 16. Operation of column loading under expected nominal full-scale field conditions in the HFIR pool showed that radiolytic gases were formed at a previously calculated generation rate of 0.4 mL per liter of feed solution. When the resulting cesium-loading curve in the gamma field was compared with that of a control experiment in the absence of a gamma field, no discernable difference in the curves (within analytical error) was detected. Both curves were in good agreement with the VERSE computer-generated curve. Results conclusively indicate that the production of radiolytic gases within a full-scale column is not expected to result in reduced capacity or associated gas generation problems during operation at the Savannah River Site.
Date: February 12, 2001
Creator: Mattus, A.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Volume 4: Characterization of representative reservoirs -- Gulf of Mexico field, U-8 reservoir

Description: A reservoir study was performed using a publicly available black oil simulator to history match and predict the performance of a Gulf of Mexico reservoir. The first objective of this simulation study was to validate the Black Oil Applied Simulation Tool version three for personal computers (BOAST3-PC) model to ensure the integrity of the simulation runs. Once validation was completed, a field history match for the Gulf of Mexico U-8 oil reservoir was attempted. A verbal agreement was reached with the operator of this reservoir to blindcode the name and location of the reservoir. In return, the operator supplied data and assistance in regards to the technical aspects of the research. On the basis of the best history match, different secondary recovery techniques were simulated as a predictive study for enhancing the reservoir productivity.
Date: July 1, 1998
Creator: Koperna, G.J. Jr.; Johnson, H.R.; Salamy, S.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Sawyer, W.K.; Kimbrell, W.C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Downhole oil/water separators offer lower costs and greater environmental protection

Description: Produced water management can be a significant expense for oil and gas operators. This paper summarizes a study of the technical, economic, and regulatory feasibility of a relatively new technology, downhole oil/water separators (DOWS), to reduce the volume of water pumped to the surface. The study was funded by the US Department of Energy and conducted by Argonne National Laboratory, CH2M Hill, and the Nebraska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. DOWS are devices that separate oil and gas from produced water at the bottom of the well and reinject some of the produced water into another formation or another horizon within the same formation, while the oil and gas are pumped to the surface. Since much of the produced water is not pumped to the surface, treated, and pumped from the surface back into a deep formation, the cost of handling produced water is greatly reduced. The oil production rate has increased for more than half of the DOWS installations to date.
Date: November 2, 1999
Creator: Veil, J. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design and Development of Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone Compact Separators for Three-Phase Flow

Description: The objective of this five-year project (October, 1997--September, 2002) is to expand the current research activities of Tulsa University Separation Technology Projects (TUSTP) to multiphase oil/water/gas separation. This project will be executed in two phases. Phase I (1997--2000) will focus on the investigations of the complex multiphase hydrodynamic flow behavior in a three-phase Gas-Liquid Cylindrical Cyclone (GLCC) Separator. The activities of this phase will include the development of a mechanistic model, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulator, and detailed experimentation on the three-phase GLCC. The experimental and CFD simulation results will be suitably integrated with the mechanistic model. In Phase II (2000--2002), the developed GLCC separator will be tested under high pressure and real crudes conditions. This is crucial for validating the GLCC design for field application and facilitating easy and rapid technology deployment. Design criteria for industrial applications will be developed based on these results and will be incorporated into the mechanistic model by TUSTP.
Date: October 28, 1999
Creator: Mohan, Ram S. & Shoham, Ovadia
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

Description: One of the main objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, several field demonstrations were undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The important observations from each of these field demonstrations are briefly reviewed in this annual report. These demonstrations have been successful in identifying the presence or lack of hydrocarbons in the subsurface and can be summarized as follows: (1) The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path of the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 horizontal demonstration well in Manistee County, Michigan. The well was put on production in December 2003. To date, the well is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. Two successful follow-up horizontal wells have also been drilled in the Springdale area. Additional geochemistry data will be collected in the Springdale area in 2004. (2) The surface geochemistry sampling in the Bear Lake demonstration site in Manistee County, Michigan was updated after the prospect was confirmed and production begun; the original subsurface and seismic interpretation used to guide the location of the geochemical survey for the Charlich Fauble re-entry was different than the interpretation used by the operator who ultimately drilled the well. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) microbial anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. (3) The geochemical sampling program over the Vernon Field, Isabella County, Michigan ...
Date: April 1, 2004
Creator: Wood, James R.; Wylie, A. & Quinlan, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

APPLICATION OF CYCLIC CO2 METHODS IN AN OVER-MATURE MISICBLE CO2 PILOT PROJECT-WEST MALLALIEU FIELD, LINCOLN COUNTY, MS

Description: This progress report summarizes the results of a miscible cyclic CO{sub 2} project conducted at West Mallalieu Field Unit (WMU) Lincoln County, MS by J.P. Oil Company, Inc. Lafayette, LA. Information is presented regarding the verification of the mechanical integrity of the present candidate well, WMU 17-2B, to the exclusion of nearby more desirable wells from a reservoir standpoint. Engineering summaries of both the injection and flow back phases of the cyclic process are presented. The results indicate that the target volume of 63 MMCF of CO{sub 2} was injected into the candidate well during the month of August 2000 and a combined 73 MMCF of CO{sub 2} and formation gas were recovered during September, October, and November 2000. The fact that all of the injected CO{sub 2} was recovered is encouraging; however, only negligible volumes of liquid were produced with the gas. A number of different factors are explored in this report to explain the lack of economic success. These are divided into several groupings and include: Reservoir Factors, Process Factors, Mechanical Factors, and Special Circumstances Factors. It is impossible to understand precisely the one or combination of interrelated factors responsible for the failure of the experiment but I feel that the original reservoir quality concerns for the subject well WMU 17-2B were not surmountable. Based on the inferences made as to possible failure mechanisms, two future test candidates were selected, WMU 17-10 and 17-14. These lie a significant distance south of the WMU Pilot area and each have a much thicker and higher quality reservoir section than does WMU 17-2B. Both of these wells were productive on pumping units in the not too distant past. This was primary production not influenced by the distant CO{sub 2} injection. These wells are currently completed within somewhat isolated reservoir channels in ...
Date: September 1, 2001
Creator: Getz, Boyd Stevens
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

Description: The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, a new field demonstration, Springdale Prospect in Manistee County, Michigan was begun to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path. The surface geochemistry sampling at the original Bear Lake demonstration site was updated several months after the prospect was confirmed and production begun. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir.
Date: October 1, 2003
Creator: Wood, James R. & Quinlan, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

Description: West Carney Field produces from Hunton Formation. All the wells produce oil, water and gas. The main objective of this study is to understand the unique behavior observed in the field. This behavior includes: (1) Decrease in WOR over time; (2) Decrease in GOR at initial stages; (3) High decline rates of oil and gas; and (4) strong hydrodynamic connectivity between wells. This report specifically addresses two issues relevant to our understanding of the West Carney reservoir. By using core and log data as well as fluorescence information, we demonstrate that our hypothesis of how the reservoir is formed is consistent with these observations. Namely, oil migrated in water wet reservoir, over time, oil changed the wettability of some part of the reservoir, oil eventually leaked to upper formations prompting re-introduction of water into reservoir. Because of change in wettability, different pore size distributions responded differently to water influx. This hypothesis is consistent with fluorescence and porosity data, as we explain it in this quarterly report. The second issue deals with how to best calculate connected oil volume in the reservoir. The log data does not necessarily provide us with relevant information regarding oil in place. However, we have developed a new material balance technique to calculate the connected oil volume based on observed pressure and production data. By using the technique to four different fields producing from Hunton formation, we demonstrate that the technique can be successfully applied to calculate the connected oil in place.
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: Kelkar, Mohan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department