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Asbestos: A Materials Survey

Description: Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing asbestos mining. As stated in the introduction, "this report gives primary consideration to the types and grades of asbestos that are of greatest importance in the program of military preparedness-namely, the spinning grades of chrysotile, both foreign and domestic, and the amosite and crocidolite obtained only from foreign sources" (p. 1). This report includes tables, maps, illustrations, and photographs.
Date: 1959
Creator: Bowles, Oliver
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Asbestos Industry

Description: Report issued by the Bureau of Mines over the production and use of asbestos. Descriptions of the different types of asbestos are discussed. Its applications are also discussed. This report includes tables, illustrations, and photographs.
Date: 1955
Creator: Bowles, Oliver
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Asbestos

Description: From Introduction: "This report covers the essential features of the asbestos industry, including occurrence, production, mining, milling, utilization, international trade, and marketing."
Date: 1937
Creator: Bowles, Oliver
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chrysotile-Asbestos Deposits of Arizona: Supplement to Information Circular 7706

Description: Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing asbestos mining and production in Arizona. As a supplement to a previous report, 18 additional Arizona mining districts are presented and described. This report includes tables, maps, illustrations, and photographs.
Date: May 1956
Creator: Stewart, Lincoln A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Development of Predictive Models for the Acid Degradation of Chrysotile Asbestos

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine the factors affecting the acid degradation of chrysotile asbestos (Mg_3Si_2O_5(OH_4)) . Millions of tons of asbestos have found use in this country as insulative or ablative material. More than 95 percent of the asbestos in use is of the chrysotile variety. The remaining 5 percent is composed of various types of fibrous amphiboles. The inhalation of asbestos can lead to several diseases in humans. Asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma are the most common afflictions associated with asbestos inhalation, and they may occur up to 40 years after the initial exposure. It has previously been reported that if more than 50 percent of the magnesium is removed from a chrysotile sample its carcinogenicity is reduced to nil. Several inorganic acids were studied to determine their ability to leach magnesium from chrysotile. It was found that the ability to leach magnesium was dependent upon the acidic anion in addition to the concentration of the acid. The ordering of the efficiency of the acids in their ability to remove magnesium from chrysotile was found to be HCl > H_2SO_4 > H_3PO_4 > HNO_3. Predictive equations were developed to allow the calculation of the amount of magnesium removed under various acid concentrations as a function of time and acid species. The effects of temperature and dissolved spectator cations upon the degradation process were also examined. There was no major effect on the amount of magnesium removed as a function of spectator cation concentration. An infrared method was also developed to allow the determination of the percent degradation of a chrysotile sample directly. The shifts in the positions of three silicate stretching peaks (1068 cm^-1, 948 cm^-1 and 715 cm^-1) and one magnesium oxygen stretching peak (415 cm"1) as a function of the percent magnesium removed were ...
Date: May 1993
Creator: Ingram, Kevin D. (Kevin Dean)
Partner: UNT Libraries

S. 852: The Fairness in Asbestos Injury Resolution Act of 2005

Description: From Summary: "This report provides an overview of S. 852, the Fairness in Asbestos Injury Resolution (FAIR) Act of 2005. The bill would largely remove asbestos claims from the courts in favor of the administrative process set out in the bill. The bill would establish the Office of Asbestos Disease Compensation to award damages to asbestos claimants on a no-fault basis from the Asbestos Injury Claims Resolution Fund."
Date: April 26, 2005
Creator: Brooks, Nathan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mining and Milling Methods and Costs, Vermont Asbestos Mines, The Ruberoid Company, Hyde Park, Vermont

Description: Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing mining and milling conducted in Hyde Park, Vermont. As stated in the introduction, "the report describes all phases of the mining methods for the open-pit operation and milling practices employed at the Vermont Asbestos mines in Lamoille and Orleans counties, Vermont" (p. 1). This report includes maps, tables, illustrations, and photographs.
Date: 1962
Creator: Burmeister, Harry Louis & Matthews, I. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chrysotile-Asbestos Deposits of Arizona

Description: Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing asbestos mining and production in Arizona. As stated in the summary, "this paper describes most of the chrysotile-asbestos deposits of Arizona. Mining methods are discussed briefly and asbestos-mill flowsheets are incorporated" (p. 1). This report includes tables, maps, illustrations, and photographs.
Date: January 1955
Creator: Stewart, L. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fairness in Asbestos Injury Resolution Act of 2004 (S. 2290, 108th Congress)

Description: This report provides an overview of S. 2290, 108th Congress, the Fairness in Asbestos Injury Resolution Act of 2004 (or FAIR Act of 2004). The bill is a revised version of S. 1125, 108th Congress, and would create the Office of Asbestos Disease Compensation to award damages to asbestos claimants on a no-fault basis. Asbestos claims could no longer be filed or pursued under state law, except for the enforcement of judgments no longer subject to any appeal or judicial review before the date of enactment of the bill.
Date: April 14, 2004
Creator: Cohen, Henry
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Asbestos Litigation: Prospects for Legislative Resolution

Description: This report summarizes H.R. 1283, 106th Congress, the Asbestos Compensation Act of 2000, as ordered to be reported with amendments by the House Committee on the Judiciary on March 16, 2000. The bill would create an administrative procedure for asbestos liability claims. Also, This report discusses such issues thematically, and will be updated to reflect major legislative actions. A section-by-section analysis of S. 852 may be found in CRS Report RS22081, S. 852: The Fairness in Asbestos Injury Resolution Act of 2005.
Date: May 20, 2005
Creator: Rappaport, Edward B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Asbestos Litigation: Prospects for Legislative Resolution

Description: This report summarizes H.R. 1283, 106th Congress, the Asbestos Compensation Act of 2000, as ordered to be reported with amendments by the House Committee on the Judiciary on March 16, 2000. The bill would create an administrative procedure for asbestos liability claims. Also, This report discusses such issues thematically, and will be updated to reflect major legislative actions. A section-by-section analysis of S. 852 may be found in CRS Report RS22081, S. 852: The Fairness in Asbestos Injury Resolution Act of 2005.
Date: April 20, 2004
Creator: Rappaport, Edward B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geochemical Signatures as a Tool for Vermiculite Provenance Determination

Description: Thirty-eight samples of known origin (China, Libby MT, South Africa, South Carolina) and 6 vermiculite product samples of unknown origin were analyzed for major and trace elements, including rare earth elements to determine the feasibility of distinguishing the provenance of the samples based upon a geochemical signature. Probability plots suggest that two of the four groups (Libby, South Carolina) were comprised of two subgroups. Results of hierarchical cluster analysis are highly sensitive to the linkage method chosen. Ward’s method is the most useful for this data and suggests that there are five groups within the data set (South African samples, two subsets of the Libby samples, a subset of the South Carolina samples, and a second subset of the South Carolina samples combined with the China samples). Similar results were obtained using k-cluster analysis. Neither clustering method was able to distinguish samples from China from the South Carolina samples. Discriminant analysis was used on a four-category model comprised of the original four groups and on a six-category model comprised of the five categories identified from the cluster analysis but with the China samples grouped into a sixth category. The discriminant/classification model was able to distinguish all of the groups including the China samples from one another for both the four- and six-category models with 100% of the samples properly classified. The 6 unknown product samples were classified with a probability of consistency of 99%. Both discriminant models were also run with a subset of our analyte set to be consistent with the smaller Gunter et al., (2005) analyte set. Twenty vermiculite samples (nine of known origin and eleven of unknown origin) from their study were classified based on our discriminant models with the reduced set of analytes. Of the twenty samples, Gunter et al. (2005) was able to classify 16 ...
Date: September 1, 2008
Creator: Wright, Karen E. & Palmer, Carl D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Site Cleanup Report for Sites PBF-33 and PBF-34

Description: This document summaries the actions taken to remove asbestos-reinforced-concrete (transite) pipe and miscellaneous debris from Power Purst Facility (PBF)-33 and PBF-34 sites. Removal of pipe and debris were performed in November 2006 in accordance with the requirements discussed in notice of soil disturbance NSD-PBF-07-01. Debris at these two sites were classified as industrial waste that could be disposed at the Central Facilities Area (CFA) landfill at the Idaho National Laboratory. Asbestos removal was performed as Class IV asbestos cleanup work. All transite pipe was double bagged and dispositioned in the INL Landfill Complex at CFA. The remaining miscellaneous debris was loaded into dump trucks and taken to the INL Landfill Complex at CFA for final disposition. Cleanup actions are complete for both sites, and no debris or hazardous constituents remain. Therefore, both sites will be classified as No action sites.
Date: January 16, 2007
Creator: Jolley, W. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Uranium Occurrences in Wilson Creek Area, Gila County, Arizona

Description: Abstract: The Wilson Creek Area, in northern Gila Cointy, is about 10 miles southeast of Young, Arizona, along the east side of Cherry Creek. Four claims covering concentrations of uranium mineralization in the Dripping Spring Formation are owned by the American Asbestos Cement Company. The claims are located in typical plateau-type topography, with flat mesa* and nearly vertical canyon walls. The bedded zones of uranium mineralization are exposed in the Dripping Spring Quartzite near the bottom of the canyons. It is suggested that the mineralized beds may have spatial relationship to the bottom of the Mescal limestone and to the bottom of a thick zone in the upper member of the quart site. Two of the four bedded deposits occur in *crackled" beds. One mineralized fracture was noted. The uranium mineral, meta-torbernite, has formed in tiny vugs in the quart site and is also intergrown with the iron oxide coating on the quart site surfaces. Associated minerals are minor and consist of chalcopyrite magnetite and chalcocite.
Date: December 1953
Creator: Wells, R. L. & Rambosek, A. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Asbestos Compensation Act of 2000

Description: This report summarizes H.R. 1283, 106th Congress, the Asbestos Compensation Act of 2000, as ordered to be reported with amendments by the House Committee on the Judiciary on March 16, 2000. The bill would create an administrative procedure for asbestos liability claims.
Date: April 13, 2000
Creator: Cohen, Henry
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fluidized Bed Asbestos Sampler Design and Testing

Description: A large number of samples are required to characterize a site contaminated with asbestos from previous mine or other industrial operations. Current methods, such as EPA Region 10’s glovebox method, or the Berman Elutriator method are time consuming and costly primarily because the equipment is difficult to decontaminate between samples. EPA desires a shorter and less costly method for characterizing soil samples for asbestos. The objective of this was to design and test a qualitative asbestos sampler that operates as a fluidized bed. The proposed sampler employs a conical spouted bed to vigorously mix the soil and separate fine particulate including asbestos fibers on filters. The filters are then analyzed using transmission electron microscopy for presence of asbestos. During initial testing of a glass prototype using ASTM 20/30 sand and clay fines as asbestos surrogates, fine particulate adhered to the sides of the glass vessel and the tubing to the collection filter – presumably due to static charge on the fine particulate. This limited the fines recovery to ~5% of the amount added to the sand surrogate. A second prototype was constructed of stainless steel, which improved fines recovery to about 10%. Fines recovery was increased to 15% by either humidifying the inlet air or introducing a voltage probe in the air space above the sample. Since this was not a substantial improvement, testing using the steel prototype proceeded without using these techniques. Final testing of the second prototype using asbestos suggests that the fluidized bed is considerably more sensitive than the Berman elutriator method. Using a sand/tremolite mixture with 0.005% tremolite, the Berman elutriator did not segregate any asbestos structures while the fluidized bed segregated an average of 11.7. The fluidized bed was also able to segregate structures in samples containing asbestos at a 0.0001% concentration, while the Berman ...
Date: December 1, 2007
Creator: Wright, Karen E. & O'Brien, Barry H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Medical Surveillance for Former Workers

Description: The Former Hanford Worker Medical Monitoring Program, directed by the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program at the University of Washington, served former production and other non-construction workers who were potentially exposed to workplace hazards while working for the USDOE or its contractors at Hanford. The USDOE Former Workers Program arose from Congressional action in the Defense Authorization of 1993 (Public Law 102). Section 3162 stated that, “The Secretary shall establish and carry out a program for the identification and ongoing medical evaluation of current and former Department of Energy employees who are subject to significant health risks as a result of exposure of such employees to hazardous or radioactive substances during such employment.” (This also covers former employees of USDOE contractors and subcontractors.) The key objective has been to provide these former workers with medical evaluations in order to determine whether workers have experienced significant risk due to workplace exposure to hazards. Exposures to asbestos, beryllium, and noise can produce specific medical conditions: asbestosis, berylliosis, and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Each of these conditions can be identified by specific, non-invasive screening tests, which are widely available. Treatments are also available for individuals affected by these conditions. This project involved two phases. Phase I involved a needs and risk assessment, characterizing the nature and extent of workplace health hazards which may have increased the risk for long-term health effects. We categorized jobs and tasks by likelihood of exposures to specific workplace health hazards; and located and established contact with former Hanford workers. Phase II involved implementation of medical monitoring programs for former workers whose individual work history indicated significant risk for adverse health effects. We identified 118,000 former workers, employed from 1943 to 1997. After excluding current workers, construction workers, and deceased workers, the total estimated number of former workers eligible ...
Date: May 29, 2009
Creator: Firestone, Tim Takaro Jordan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Real-Time Identification and Characterization of Asbestos and Concrete Materials with Radioactive Contamination

Description: Concrete and asbestos-containing materials were widely used in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) building construction in the 1940s and 1950s. Over the years, many of these porous building materials have been contaminated with radioactive sources, on and below the surface. This intractable radioactive-and-hazardous-asbestos mixed-waste stream has created a tremendous challenge to DOE decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) project managers. The current practice to identify asbestos and to characterize radioactive contamination depth profiles in based solely on bore sampling, which is inefficient, costly, and unsafe. A three-year research project was started 1998 at Rensselaer with the following ultimate goals: (1) development of novel non-destructive methods for identifying the hazardous asbestos in real-time and in-situ, and (2) development of new algorithms and apparatus for characterizing the radioactive contamination depth profile in real-time and in-situ.
Date: June 1, 2000
Creator: Xu, George & Zhang, Xi-Cheng
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Real-Time Identification and Characterization of Asbestos and Concrete Materials with Radioactive Contamination

Description: Concrete and asbestos-containing materials were widely used in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) building construction in the 1940s and 1950s. Over the years, many of these porous building materials have been contaminated with radioactive sources, on and below the surface. This intractable radioactive-and-hazardous- asbestos mixed-waste-stream has created a tremendous challenge to DOE decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) project managers. The current practice to identify asbestos and to characterize radioactive contamination depth profiles involve bore sampling, and is inefficient, costly, and unsafe. A three-year research project was started on 10/1/98 at Rensselaer with the following ultimate goals: (1) development of novel non-destructive methods for identifying the hazardous asbestos in real-time and in-situ, and (2) development of new algorithms and apparatus for characterizing the radioactive contamination depth profile in real-time and in-situ.
Date: June 1, 1999
Creator: Xu, George & Zhang, Xi-Cheng
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Three Dimensional, Integrated Characterization and Archival System for Remote Facility Contaminant Characterization

Description: The largest problem facing the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM) is the cleanup of the Cold War legacy nuclear production plants that were built and operated from the mid-forties through the late eighties. EM is now responsible for the remediation of no less than 353 projects at 53 sites across the country at, an estimated cost of $147 billion over the next 72 years. One of the keys to accomplishing a thorough cleanup of any site is a rigorous but quick contaminant characterization capability. If the contaminants present in a facility can be mapped accurately, the cleanup can proceed with surgical precision, using appropriate techniques for each contaminant type and location. The three dimensional, integrated characterization and archival system (3D-ICAS) was developed for the purpose of rapid, field level identification, mapping, and archiving of contaminant data. The system consists of three subsystems, an integrated work and operating station, a 3-D coherent laser radar, and a contaminant analysis unit. Target contaminants that can be identified include chemical (currently organic only), radiological, and base materials (asbestos). In operation, two steps are required. First, the remotely operable 3-D laser radar maps an area of interest in the spatial domain. Second, the remotely operable contaminant analysis unit maps the area of interest in the chemical, radiological, and base material domains. The resultant information is formatted for display and archived using an integrated workstation. A 3-D model of the merged spatial and contaminant domains cart be displayed along with a color-coded contaminant tag at each analysis point. In addition, all of the supporting detailed data are archived for subsequent QC checks. The 3D-ICAS system is capable of performing all contaminant characterization in a dwell time of 6 seconds. The radiological and chemical sensors operate at US Environmental Protection Agency regulatory levels. Base ...
Date: April 25, 1999
Creator: Barry, R.E.; Gallman, P.; Jarvis, G. & Griffiths, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Biosciences Program Fourth Quarter Report

Description: In May 2002, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) signed Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC09-02CH11109 with the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) to support the Environmental Biosciences Program (EBP). This funding instrument replaces DOE Assistance Instrument Number DE-FC02-98CH10902. EBP is an integrated, multidisciplinary scientific program, employing a range of research initiatives to identify, study and resolve environmental health risk issues. These initiatives are consistent with the Medical University's role as a comprehensive state-supported health sciences institution and the nation's need for new and better approaches to the solution of a complex and expansive array of environment-related health problems. The intrinsic capabilities of a comprehensive health sciences institution enable the Medical University to be a national resource for the scientific investigation of environmental health issues. EBP's success in convening worldwide scientific expertise is due in part to the inherent credibility the Medical University brings to the process of addressing these complex issues.
Date: April 30, 2003
Creator: Lawrence C. Mohr, M.d.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department