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Transcribing Orchestral Accompaniments of Large Choral Works for the Organ

Description: The art of transcribing orchestral accompaniments for organ is one of the most difficult problems which organists must face. Although a few will become professional recitalists, most organists will at one time or other have a church position and be required to play oratorios and other large choral compositions which were originally scored for orchestra. Several of the most popular of these works (Handel's Messiah, Saint-Saëns's Christmas Oratorio, Fauŕe's Requiem) have already been arranged for organ, but the majority are available only in piano reductions. The main body of the paper deals with this latter group of works, for it is here that the most urgent problems exist. However, some of the organ arrangements now available need considerable revision because they try to imitate the whole orchestra and are virtually impossible to play. Therefore, some preliminary comments on already existing transcriptions seem necessary.
Date: August 1966
Creator: Anderson, David Zane
Partner: UNT Libraries

Musical Arrangements and Questions of Genre: A Study of Liszt's Interpretive Approaches

Description: Through his exceptional creative and performing abilities, Franz Liszt was able to transform compositions of many kinds into unified, intelligible, and pleasing arrangements for piano. Nineteenth-century definitions of "arrangement" and "Klavierauszug," which focus on the process of reworking a composition for a different medium, do not adequately describe Liszt's work in this area. His piano transcriptions of Schubert's songs, Berlioz's Symphonie fantastique and the symphonies of Beethoven are not note-for-note transcriptions; rather, they reinterpret the originals in recasting them as compositions for solo piano. Writing about Liszt's versions of Schubert's songs, a Viennese critic identified as "Carlo" heralded Liszt as the creator of a new genre and declared him to have made Schubert's songs the property of cultured pianists. Moreover, Liszt himself designated his work with Berlioz's Symphonie fantastique and the symphonies of Beethoven "Partitions de piano": literally, piano scores. As is well known, concepts of genre in general create problems for musicologists; musical arrangements add a new dimension of difficulty to the problem. Whereas Carl Dahlhaus identifies genre as a tool for interpreting composers' responses to the social dimension of music in the fabric of individual compositions, Jeffrey Kallberg perceives it as a "social phenomenon shared by composers and listeners alike." The latter concept provides a more suitable framework for discussing the genre of transcriptions, for their importance derives in large part from relationships between the original and the derivative works, both as constructed by Liszt and perceived by critics and audiences. During the nineteenth and early twentieth century's, Liszt's transcriptions of songs and symphonies were construed as both compositions for pianists and subsets of the originals. Consequently, these compositions should be studied for their own musical value as well as for the light that they shed on the original works. Liszt's transcriptions are derivative and at the same ...
Date: May 2010
Creator: Van Dine, Kara Lynn
Partner: UNT Libraries

Adaptation of Handel's Castrato Airs for Bass: A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Selected Works of J.S. Bach, W. Mozart, M. Ravel, G. Finzi, R. Schumann, A. Caldara, G. Handel, H. Wolf, H. Duparc, C. Ives and S. Barber and an Operatic Role by Verdi

Description: The lecture recital was given on April 18, 1977. The subject was Adaptation of Handel's Castrato Airs for Bass, and it included a discussion of conventions peculiar to Handelian opera seria, concerns regarding adaptation of Handel's castrato airs and a comparison of adaptation practices in eighteenth- and twentieth-century presentations of Handel's operas. Three coloratura castrato airs and two virtuoso bass airs were performed at the conclusion of the lecture. In addition to the lecture recital, one operatic role and three recitals of solo literature for voice, piano and chamber ensemble were publicly performed. These included the role of "Samuele" in A Masked Ball, by Verdi, performed in English on March 19, 1975 with the Opera Theatre of North Texas State University, a program presented on November 24, 1975,of solo literature for voice, piano, and chamber ensemble, including works by J. S. Bach, W. Mozart, M. Ravel and G. Finzi, a program consisting of a set of works by R. Schumann presented on June 27, 1985, and a program presented on October 28, 1985,of solo literature for voice, piano, and chamber ensemble,including works by A. Caldara, G. Handel, H. Wolf, H. Duparc, C. Ives and S. Barber.
Date: May 1986
Creator: Fern, Terry L. (Terry Lee)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Liszt's Schubert Lieder Transcriptions: A Study of Liszt Pianistic Idoms in the Transcriptive Procedure. A Lecture Recital, Together with Three Recitals of Works by Mozart, Debussy, Schumann, Griffes, and Other Composers

Description: Franz Liszt, who was the greatest virtuoso pianist in the nineteenth-century, was also a productive composer. But his tremendous technique brought the misunderstanding that his compositions were just flashy and superficial, thus creating an obstacle for appreciating his music. The purpose of this study is to encourage an understanding of the value of Liszt's music, especially his Schubert Lieder transcriptions. The study starts with an introduction, which states the revival of the art of transcription, gives the muscial background of Liszt and describes the instruments that were available to him. Then follows a discussion about his experimentation with the conventional piano techniques and how he applied them to the song transcriptions. Two transcriptions "Hark, Hark, the Lark" and "Der Lindenbaum" are analyzed in detail to show the transcriptive procedure and the relation between the poetry and the musical expression. A conclusion summarizes the study.
Date: August 1983
Creator: Ku, Hsiao-hung
Partner: UNT Libraries

Developing a Guide to the Techniques of Imitating Selected Commercial Music Styles

Description: The purpose of this study was to develop a guide to help teach commercial music style imitation, Styles selected were ragtime, dixieland, Whiteman, Goodman, Miller, bop, Berry, Presley, Motown, hard rock, horn band, soft rock, straight ahead big band, Ellington, Basie, country rock, bluegrass, Country-Western, Mantovani, Boston Pops, and Love Unlimited Orchestra. Melody, harmony, rhythm, voicing, instrumentation, form, special effects, performance techniques, electronic alteration, and articulation were discussed for each style. A table summarizing each discussion, and an arrangement and recording of the same melody in each style were included, The guide appears successful, judging from commercial writers' estimations, The work will probably aid writers, performers, researchers, and publishers. Similar works could be done on other commercial and ethnic styles.
Date: August 1975
Creator: King, Jeffrey M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Rebecca Clarke: A Viola Duo Transcription of the Prelude, Allegro, and Pastorale

Description: Throughout centuries of great classical music, many viola compositions have been crafted from a wealth of literature for instruments of similar range. Clarinet, violin, and cello concerti and ensemble literature often adapt into challenging literature for the viola. In November 2009, Oxford Music Publishing gave me permission to transcribe and perform the Prelude, Allegro, and Pastorale by Rebecca Clarke in New York's famed Carnegie Hall - Weill Recital Hall. This dissertation explains the process by which I transcribed the Prelude, Allegro, and Pastorale from an original Bb-clarinet/viola duo, to a new arrangement for two violas (approved by Oxford Music Press arrangement license #7007940), and discusses challenges faced throughout the transcription process.
Date: August 2010
Creator: Stevens, Daniel Brent
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Rapsodie for Orchestra and Saxophone by Claude Debussy: a Comparison of Two Performance Editions

Description: This paper discusses the historical background of the Rapsodie for Orchestra and Saxophone by Claude Debussy and includes a comparison of two piano performance editions. Chapter I includes information on Elise Hall, her work with the Boston Orchestra Club and the circumstances of her commission of Claude Debussy which yielded the Rapsodie. Chapter II discusses the Editions Durand piano reduction and the reasons for its neglect by saxophone performers. This chapter includes a study of the techniques used by Eugene Rousseau to create his arrangement of the Rapsodie for saxophone and piano. The study concludes that the arrangement by Rousseau is more attractive to saxophonists and will be performed more frequently than the Durand reduction.
Date: December 1988
Creator: Seligson, Robert Jan
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Comparison of the Transcription Techniques of Godowsky and Liszt as Exemplified in Their Transcriptions of Three Schubert Lieder

Description: This investigation sought to compare the transcription techniques of two pianist-composers, Godowsky and Liszt, using three Schubert lieder as examples. The lieder were "Das Wandern" from Die Schöne Müllerin, "Gute Nacht" from Winterreise, and "Liebesbotschaft" from Schwanengesang. They were compared using four criteria: tonality, counterpoint, timbral effects, and harmony. Liszt, following a practice common in the nineteenth century, was primarily concerned with bringing new music into the home of the domestic pianist. The piano transcription was the most widely used and successful medium for accomplishing this. Liszt also frequently transcribed pieces of a particular composer in order to promulgate them by featuring them in his recitals. The Schubert lieder fall into this category. Liszt did not drastically alter the original in these compositions. Indeed, in the cases of "Liebesbotschaft" and "Das Wandern," very little alteration beyond the incorporation of the melody into the piano accompaniment, occurs.Godowsky, in contrast, viewed the transcription as a vehicle for composing a new piece. He intended to improve upon the original by adding his own inspiration to it. Godowsky was particularly ingenious in adding counterpoint, often chromatic, to the original. Examples of Godowsky's use of counterpoint can be found in "Das Wandern" and "Gute Nacht." While Liszt strove to remain faithful to Schubert's intentions, Godowsky exercised his ingenuity at will, being only loosely concerned with the texture and atmosphere of the lieder. "Gute Nacht" and "Liebesbotschaft" are two examples that show how far afield Godowsky could stray from the original by the addition of chromatic voicing and counterpoint. Godowsky*s compositions can be viewed as perhaps the final statement on the possibilities of piano writing in the traditional sense. As such these works deserve to be investigated and performed.
Date: December 1987
Creator: Cloutier, David, 1948-
Partner: UNT Libraries