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Hypoxemia Attenuates Coronary Autoregulation

Description: The effect of hypoxemia on coronary autoregulation was investigated in nine anesthetized, open-chest dogs. The anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was cannulated and perfused with normoxic arterial blood and with moderately hypoxic blood (0₂ content = 10 + 1 ml 0₂ /dl). LAD blood flow was measured as perfusion pressure was varied from 140 to 40 mmHg. At perfusion pressures at and above 40 mmHg, hypoxemia significantly increased LAD flow. During normoxia, the autoregulatory closed-loop gain (Gc) was significantly greater than zero at perfusion pressures from 60 to 120 mmHg. During hypoxemia, Gc was greater than zero only at perfusion pressures from 80 to 100 mmHg. During hypoxemia, LAD blood flow increased sufficiently to maintain oxygen delivery and consumption constant, but the range and potency of autoregulation was attenuated.
Date: August 1989
Creator: Kim, Song-Jung
Partner: UNT Libraries

Morphological and Hematological Responses to Hypoxia During Development in the Japanese quail, Coturnix coturnix

Description: Hypoxic responses in quail development differ depending upon stage, duration and level of oxygen partial pressure of embryo. Incubation was switched to/from 110mmHg partial pressure (hypoxia), to/from 150mmHg (normoxia) during different stages in development, and control was incubated in normoxia throughout. Hatchability and embryo survival resulted in no hatchlings in continuous hypoxia. Responses to various hypoxic exposures throughout development resulted in recovery/repair of hypoxic damage by hatch. Heart and body mass, beak and toe length, hemoglobin, and hematocrit were measured to determine embryo responses to hypoxia during development at days 10, 15, and hatch. Hypoxia seemed to have the most deleterious effects on eggs in continuous hypoxia. Collectively, data indicate critical developmental windows for hypoxia susceptibility, especially during mid-embryonic development.
Date: May 2003
Creator: Elmonoufy, Nourhan
Partner: UNT Libraries

Genetic and Cellular Analysis of Anoxia-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest in Caenorhabditis elegans

Description: The soil-nematode Caenorhabditis elegans survives oxygen deprivation (anoxia < 0.001 kPa of O2, 0% O2) by entering into a state of suspended animation during which cell cycle progression at interphase, prophase and metaphase stage of mitosis is arrested. I conducted cell biological characterization of embryos exposed to various anoxia exposure times, to demonstrate the requirement and functional role of spindle checkpoint gene san-1 during brief anoxia exposure. I conducted a synthetic lethal screen, which has identified genetic interactions between san-1, other spindle checkpoint genes, and the kinetochore gene hcp-1. Furthermore, I investigated the genetic and cellular mechanisms involved in anoxia-induced prophase arrest, a hallmark of which includes chromosomes docked at the nuclear membrane. First, I conducted in vivo analysis of embryos carried inside the uterus of an adult and exposed to anoxic conditions. These studies demonstrated that anoxia exposure prevents nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD) in prophase blastomeres. Second, I exposed C. elegans embryos to other conditions of mitotic stress such as microtubule depolymerizing agent nocodazole and mitochondrial inhibitor sodium azide. Results demonstrate that NEBD and chromosome docking are independent of microtubule function. Additionally, unlike anoxia, exposure to sodium azide causes chromosome docking in prophase blastomeres but severely affects embryonic viability. Finally, to identify the genetic mechanism(s) of anoxia-induced prophase arrest, I conducted extensive RNA interference (RNAi) screen of a subset of kinetochore and inner nuclear membrane genes. RNAi analysis has identified the novel role of 2 nucleoporins in anoxia-induced prophase arrest.
Date: December 2008
Creator: Hajeri, Vinita A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Existence of an Alpha One-Adrenoceptor-Mediated Coronary Vasoconstrictor Reflex During Acute Systemic Hypoxia, in Anesthetized, Open-Chest Dogs

Description: The presence of an alpha-adrenoceptor--mediated coronary vasoconstrictor reflex during acute systemic hypoxia was examined in thirteen chloralose-anesthetized dogs. Local vasodilator effects were avoided by perfusing the left common coronary artery (LCC) with normoxic blood, while the dogs were ventilated with 5% 02-95% N2 . Left ventricular afterload was held constant and positive cardiac inotropic responses and beta two-adrenoceptor-mediated coronary vasodilation were blocked by propranolol. Parasympatheticmediated bradycardia and coronary vasodilation were blocked with atropine. Systemic hypoxia decreased LCC flow to normoxic myocardium by 19.4+2.6 %. Although myocardial oxygen extraction increased 9.7+2.9 %, myocardial oxygen consumption decreased 16.5+2.6 %. Intracoronary prazosin prevented the reflex vasoconstriction during repeated hypoxia.
Date: December 1987
Creator: Grice, Derald Preston
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effect of Hypoxic Training Upon the Speed of Sprint Freestyle in High School Competitive Swimming

Description: This study investigated possible effects of hypoxic training upon speed of high school sprint freestyle. Thirty-eight subjects, grouped as their two schools, performed identical loads during the ten-week program. The Experimental group used hypoxic techniques for about one-half of each workout. Pretests and posttests conducted for the 50-yard and 100-yard distances yielded highly correlated mean scores, with marked differences between the two groups. Analysis of covariance was used, selecting the .05 level for rejection. The comparison of adjusted group means indicated neither group superior at 50 yards, while the 100-yard F-ratio was significant at the .0047 level favoring hypoxic training. It is recommended that hypoxic techniques be incorporated into existing programs, possibly benefitting other strokes.
Date: August 1976
Creator: Young, William Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries

Genetic Mechanisms for Anoxia Survival in C. Elegans

Description: Oxygen deprivation can be pathological for many organisms, including humans. Consequently, there are several biologically and economically relevant negative impacts associated with oxygen deprivation. Developing an understanding of which genes can influence survival of oxygen deprivation will enable the formulation of more effective policies and practices. In this dissertation, genes that influence adult anoxia survival in the model metazoan system, C. elegans, are identified and characterized. Insulin-like signaling, gonad function and gender have been shown to influence longevity and stress resistance in the soil nematode, C. elegans. Thus, either of these two processes or gender may influence anoxia survival. The hypothesis that insulin-like signaling alters anoxia survival in C. elegans is tested in Aim I. The hypotheses that gonad function or gender modulates anoxia survival are tested in Aim II. Insulin-like signaling affects anoxia survival in C. elegans. Reduction of insulin-like signaling through mutation of the insulin-like receptor, DAF-2, increases anoxia survival rates in a gpd-2/3 dependent manner. The glycolytic genes gpd-2/3 are necessary for wild-type response to anoxia, and sufficient for increasing anoxia survival through overexpression. Gonad function and gender both affect anoxia survival in C. elegans. A reduction of ovulation and oocyte maturation, as measured by oocyte flux, is associated with enhanced anoxia survival in all cases examined to date. Reduction of function of several genes involved in germline development and RTK/Ras/MAPK signaling reduce ovulation and oocyte maturation while concurrently increasing anoxia survival. The act of mating does not influence anoxia survival, but altering ovulation through breeding or chemical treatment does. The male phenotype also increases anoxia survival rates independent of genotype. These studies have identified and characterized over ten different genotypes that affect adult survival of anoxia in C. elegans. Before these studies were conducted, there were no genes known to influence adult anoxia survival in C. ...
Date: August 2008
Creator: Mendenhall, Alexander R.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Biological Applications of a Strongly Luminescent Platinum (II) Complex in Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging and Hypoxia Imaging in Caenorhabditis elegans

Description: Phosphorescent transition metal complexes make up an important group of compounds that continues to attract intense research owing to their intrinsic bioimaging applications that arise from bright emissions, relatively long excited state lifetimes, and large stokes shifts. Now for biomaging assay a model organism is required which must meet certain criteria for practical applications. The organism needs to be small, with a high turn-over of progeny (high fecundity), a short lifecycle, and low maintenance and assay costs. Our model organism C. elegans met all the criteria. The ideal phosphor has low toxicity in the model organism. In this work the strongly phosphorescent platinum (II) pyrophosphito-complex was tested for biological applications as a potential in vivo hypoxia sensor. The suitability of the phosphor was derived from its water solubility, bright phosphorescence at room temperature, and long excited state lifetime (~ 10 µs). The applications branched off to include testing of C. elegans survival when treated with the phosphor, which included lifespan and fecundity assays, toxicity assays including the determination of the LC50, and recovery after paraquat poisoning. Quenching experiments were performed using some well knows oxygen derivatives, and the quenching mechanisms were derived from Stern-Volmer plots. Reaction stoichiometries were derived from Job plots, while percent scavenging (or antioxidant) activities were determined graphically. The high photochemical reactivity of the complex was clearly manifested in these reactions.
Date: December 2015
Creator: Kinyanjui, Sophia Nduta
Partner: UNT Libraries