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Report on follow-up inspection of the double funding of security for special nuclear material at the Richland Operations Office

Description: In a June 3, 1993, Office of Inspections Letter Report, the Office of Inspector General notified the Department`s Acting Chief Financial Officer that the Department had requested and received $60 million, double the funds needed, for the safeguard and security of special nuclear material at the Department`s Richland Operations Office in Fiscal Year 1993. In response to the Letter Report, in a June 28, 1993, memorandum, the Acting Chief Financial Officer advised the Office of Inspector General that the extra $30 million received by the Office of Environmental Management would either be: (1) applied to unanticipated requirements in Fiscal Year 1993; (2) applied to the anticipated Congressional reduction to the Department`s Fiscal Year 1994 budget request; or (3) used as an offset to the Fiscal Year 1995 budget request. The purpose of this follow-up inspection was to review the circumstances surrounding the Fiscal Year 1993 double funding for the security of special nuclear material at Richland. The principal objectives of this inspection were to: (1) identify contributing factors to the double funding and corrective actions needed to prevent the double funding from reoccurring; and (2) review Departmental Managers` response to the double funding issue.
Date: August 28, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Communication patterns and allocation strategies.

Description: Motivated by observations about job runtimes on the CPlant system, we use a trace-driven microsimulator to begin characterizing the performance of different classes of allocation algorithms on jobs with different communication patterns in space-shared parallel systems with mesh topology. We show that relative performance varies considerably with communication pattern. The Paging strategy using the Hilbert space-filling curve and the Best Fit heuristic performed best across several communication patterns.
Date: January 1, 2004
Creator: Leung, Vitus Joseph; Mache, Jens Wolfgang & Bunde, David P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Habitat availability vs. flow rate for the Pecos River, Part 1 : Depth and velocity availability.

Description: The waters of the Pecos River in New Mexico must be delivered to three primary users: (1) The Pecos River Compact: each year a percentage of water from natural river flow must be delivered to Texas; (2) Agriculture: Carlsbad Irrigation District has a storage and diversion right and Fort Sumner Irrigation District has a direct flow diversion right; and, (3) Endangered Species Act: an as yet unspecified amount of water is to support Pecos Bluntnose Shiner Minnow habitat within and along the Pecos River. Currently, the United States Department of Interior Bureau of Reclamation, the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, and the United States Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service are studying the Pecos Bluntnose Shiner Minnow habitat preference. Preliminary work by Fish and Wildlife personnel in the critical habitat suggest that water depth and water velocity are key parameters defining minnow habitat preference. However, river flows that provide adequate preferred habitat to support this species have yet to be determined. Because there is a limited amount of water in the Pecos River and its reservoirs, it is critical to allocate water efficiently such that habitat is maintained, while honoring commitments to agriculture and to the Pecos River Compact. This study identifies the relationship between Pecos River flow rates in cubic feet per second (cfs) and water depth and water velocity.
Date: February 1, 2004
Creator: James, Scott Carlton; Schaub, Edward F.; Jepsen, Richard Alan & Roberts, Jesse Daniel
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Algorithmic support for commodity-based parallel computing systems.

Description: The Computational Plant or Cplant is a commodity-based distributed-memory supercomputer under development at Sandia National Laboratories. Distributed-memory supercomputers run many parallel programs simultaneously. Users submit their programs to a job queue. When a job is scheduled to run, it is assigned to a set of available processors. Job runtime depends not only on the number of processors but also on the particular set of processors assigned to it. Jobs should be allocated to localized clusters of processors to minimize communication costs and to avoid bandwidth contention caused by overlapping jobs. This report introduces new allocation strategies and performance metrics based on space-filling curves and one dimensional allocation strategies. These algorithms are general and simple. Preliminary simulations and Cplant experiments indicate that both space-filling curves and one-dimensional packing improve processor locality compared to the sorted free list strategy previously used on Cplant. These new allocation strategies are implemented in Release 2.0 of the Cplant System Software that was phased into the Cplant systems at Sandia by May 2002. Experimental results then demonstrated that the average number of communication hops between the processors allocated to a job strongly correlates with the job's completion time. This report also gives processor-allocation algorithms for minimizing the average number of communication hops between the assigned processors for grid architectures. The associated clustering problem is as follows: Given n points in {Re}d, find k points that minimize their average pairwise L{sub 1} distance. Exact and approximate algorithms are given for these optimization problems. One of these algorithms has been implemented on Cplant and will be included in Cplant System Software, Version 2.1, to be released. In more preliminary work, we suggest improvements to the scheduler separate from the allocator.
Date: October 1, 2003
Creator: Leung, Vitus Joseph; Bender, Michael A. (State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY); Bunde, David P. (University of Illinois, Urbna, IL) & Phillips, Cynthia Ann
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Management 1995: Progress and plans of the Environmental Management Program

Description: Environmental Management 1995 is the second report prepared in response to the requirements of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year l994. The first report, Environmental Management 1994, was published in February 1994. This report is intended to provide a broad overview of the Environmental Management program`s activities in 1994, 1995, and 1996. The first section of this report describes the Department of Energy`s Environmental Management program. This is followed by a closer look at what the program is doing across the country, organized by region to help the reader identify and locate sites of interest. Within each region, details of the largest sites are followed by site summaries reported by State and a summary of activities under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). For the purposes of this report, a ``site`` is a Department of Energy installation; a ``facility`` is a building located on a Department of Energy site; and an ``area`` is a geographical area, operable unit, or waste area group of unspecified dimension within a site. Throughout this report, ``year`` refers to the Federal Government`s Fiscal Year, which begins on October 1. For example, Fiscal Year 1995 began on October 1, 1994 and will end on September 30, 1995. Budget totals for Hanford include the Hanford Site and Richland Operations Office. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory includes the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant and the Idaho Operations Office. The Oak Ridge Reservation budget includes Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Y-12 Plant, the K-25 Site, Oak Ridge Associated Laboratories, the Oak Ridge Operations Office, and funding for the FUSRAP program.
Date: February 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Allocations for HANDI 2000 business management system

Description: The Data Integration 2000 Project will result in an integrated and comprehensive set of functional applications containing core information necessary to support the Project Hanford Management Contract. It is based on the Commercial-Off-The-Shelf product solution with commercially proven business processes. The COTS product solution set, of PassPort and People Soft software, supports finance, supply and chemical management/Material Safety Data Sheet, human resources. Allocations at Fluor Daniel Hanford are burdens added to base costs using a predetermined rate.
Date: August 24, 1998
Creator: Wilson, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strategic plan for the restructured US fusion energy sciences program

Description: This plan reflects a transition to a restructured fusion program, with a change in focus from an energy technology development program to a fusion energy sciences program. Since the energy crisis of the early 1970`s, the U.S. fusion program has presented itself as a goal- oriented fusion energy development program, with milestones that required rapidly increasing budgets. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 also called for a goal-oriented development program consistent with the Department`s planning. Actual funding levels, however, have forced a premature narrowing of the program to the tokamak approach. By 1995, with no clear, immediate need driving the schedule for developing fusion energy and with enormous pressure to reduce discretionary spending, Congress cut fusion program funding for FY 1996 by one-third and called for a major restructuring of the program. Based on the recommendations of the Fusion Energy Advisory Committee (FEAC), the Department has decided to pursue a program that concentrates on world-class plasma, science, and on maintaining an involvement in fusion energy science through international collaboration. At the same time, the Japanese and Europeans, with energy situations different from ours, are continuing with their goal- oriented fusion programs. Collaboration with them provides a highly leveraged means of continued involvement in fusion energy science and technology, especially through participation in the engineering and design activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor program, ITER. This restructured fusion energy sciences program, with its focus on fundamental fusion science and technology, may well provide insights that lead to more attractive fusion power plants, and will make use of the scientific infrastructure that will allow the United States to launch a fusion energy development program at some future date.
Date: August 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Optimization of stability index versus first strike cost

Description: This note studies the impact of maximizing the stability index rather than minimizing the first strike cost in choosing offensive missile allocations. It does so in the context of a model in which exchanges between vulnerable missile forces are modeled probabilistically, converted into first and second strike costs through approximations to the value target sets at risk, and the stability index is taken to be their ratio. The value of the allocation that minimizes the first strike cost for both attack preferences are derived analytically. The former recovers results derived earlier. The latter leads to an optimum at unity allocation for which the stability index is determined analytically. For values of the attack preference greater than about unity, maximizing the stability index increases the cost of striking first 10--15%. For smaller values of the attack preference, maximizing the index increases the second strike cost a similar amount. Both are stabilizing, so if both sides could be trusted to target on missiles in order to minimize damage to value and maximize stability, the stability index for vulnerable missiles could be increased by about 15%. However, that would increase the cost to the first striker by about 15%. It is unclear why--having decided to strike--he would do so in a way that would increase damage to himself.
Date: May 1, 1997
Creator: Canavan, G. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

USING MULTITAIL NETWORKS IN HIGH PERFORMANCE CLUSTERS

Description: Using multiple independent networks (also known as rails) is an emerging technique to overcome bandwidth limitations and enhance fault-tolerance of current high-performance clusters. We present and analyze various venues for exploiting multiple rails. Different rail access policies are presented and compared, including static and dynamic allocation schemes. An analytical lower bound on the number of networks required for static rail allocation is shown. We also present an extensive experimental comparison of the behavior of various allocation schemes in terms of bandwidth and latency. Striping messages over multiple rails can substantially reduce network latency, depending on average message size, network load and allocation scheme. The methods compared include a static rail allocation, a round-robin rail allocation, a dynamic allocation based on local knowledge, and a rail allocation that reserves both end-points of a message before sending it. The latter is shown to perform better than other methods at higher loads: up to 49% better than local-knowledge allocation and 37% better than the round-robin allocation. This allocation scheme also shows lower latency and it saturates on higher loads (for messages large enough). Most importantly, this proposed allocation scheme scales well with the number of rails and message sizes.
Date: March 1, 2001
Creator: COLL, S.; FRACHTEMBERG, E.; PETRINI, F.; HOISIE, A. & GURVITS, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Establishing Availability Requirements Using Characteristics Factors and Expert Opinion

Description: System design engineers must translate permitted overall facility downtime into detailed design and operating specifications for numerous systems and subsystems that make up the facility. The process of assigning reliability and maintainability requirements to individual equipment systems to attain a desired overall availability is known as availability apportionment. Apportionment is normally required early in conceptual design when little or no hardware information is available. Apportionment, when coupled with availability prediction, enables the selection of viable alternative configurations, identifies problem areas, and provides redirection of the program into more productive areas as necessary. A method for apportioning, or budgeting, overall facility availability requirements among systems and subsystems is presented. An example of applying this methodology to the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility is given.
Date: June 18, 2000
Creator: Haire, M.J. & Schryver, J.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy research strategic plan

Description: Research and development is an essential element of economic prosperity and a traditional source of strength for the U.S. economy. During the past two decades, the way of introducing technological developments into the national economy has changed steadily. Previously, industry did most long-term technology development and some basic research with private funding. Today, the Nation`s industry relies mostly on federally-funded research to provide the knowledge base that leads to new technologies and economic growth. In the 1980s, U.S. firms lost major technology markets to foreign competition. In response, many firms increased emphasis on technology development for near term payoff while decreasing long term research for new technology. The purpose of the Office of Energy Research of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to provide basic research and technology development that triggers and drives economic development and helps maintain U.S. world leadership in science. We do so through programs of basic and applied research that support the Department`s energy, environmental and national defense missions and that provide the foundation for technical advancement. We do so by emphasizing research that maintains our world leadership in science, mathematics, and engineering and through partnerships with universities, National Laboratories, and industries across the Nation.
Date: August 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nomenclature and name assignment rules for the APS storage ring

Description: Because the APS accelerators are moving into the fabrication/assembly/installation stage, it is important for consistent naming conventions to be used throughout the project. The intent of this note is to dictate the rules to be adhered to when naming devices in the storage ring. These rules are generic in nature, and shall be applied in principle to the other machines as well. It is essential that every component have a unique and, hopefully, easily recognizable name. Every ASD and XFD group, except for magnets, must interface with the control system. For this reason all device names were developed keeping in mind their actual function, such as controlling or monitoring some device in the ring. Even though magnets are not directly interfaced to the control system, their power supplies are; therefore, a magnet will have the same name as its associated power supply.
Date: March 16, 1992
Creator: Decker, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Requirements Allocation Analysis for Test Alcoves Excavation and Layout CII: BABEAF000

Description: The purpose and objective of this analysis are to allocate all Exploratory Studies Facility Design Requirements (ESFDR) (Reference 8.1) applicable to Configuration Item (CI) Test Alcoves Excavation and Layout, Configuration Item Identifier (CII) BABEAF000, for Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Design Package 2C.
Date: February 2, 1995
Creator: Fitch, E.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The price of commitment in online stochastic vehicle routing

Description: This paper considers online stochastic multiple vehicle routing with time windows in which requests arrive dynamically and the goal is to maximize the number of serviced customers. Early work has focused on very flexible routing settings where the decision to assign a vehicle to a customer is delayed until a vehicle is actually deployed to the customer. Motivated by real applications that require stability in the decision making, this paper considers a setting where the decision to assign a customer request to a vehicle must be taken when that request is accepted. Experimental results suggest that this constraint severely degrades the performance of existing algorithms. However, the paper shows how the use of stochastic information for vehicle assignment and request acceptance improves decision quality considerably. Moreover, the use of resource augmentation quantifies precisely the cost of commitment in online vehicle routing.
Date: January 1, 2009
Creator: Bent, Russell W & Van Hentenryck, Pascal
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Statistical language analysis for automatic exfiltration event detection.

Description: This paper discusses the recent development a statistical approach for the automatic identification of anomalous network activity that is characteristic of exfiltration events. This approach is based on the language processing method eferred to as latent dirichlet allocation (LDA). Cyber security experts currently depend heavily on a rule-based framework for initial detection of suspect network events. The application of the rule set typically results in an extensive list of uspect network events that are then further explored manually for suspicious activity. The ability to identify anomalous network events is heavily dependent on the experience of the security personnel wading through the network log. Limitations f this approach are clear: rule-based systems only apply to exfiltration behavior that has previously been observed, and experienced cyber security personnel are rare commodities. Since the new methodology is not a discrete rule-based pproach, it is more difficult for an insider to disguise the exfiltration events. A further benefit is that the methodology provides a risk-based approach that can be implemented in a continuous, dynamic or evolutionary fashion. This permits uspect network activity to be identified early with a quantifiable risk associated with decision making when responding to suspicious activity.
Date: April 1, 2010
Creator: Robinson, David Gerald
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOE Grant No. DE-FG07-90ER12990. Final report

Description: Funds were provided under the DOE University Reactor Instrumentation Program for the University of Arizona Research Reactor to update and enhance its instrumentation. During the first year of the Grant, 1990-1991, the equipment procured was to enhance the radiation protection program. Two items of equipment were purchased: a hand and foot exit monitor and a portable neutron survey meter.
Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: Williams, J.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Budget estimates. Fiscal year 1998

Description: The U.S. Congress has determined that the safe use of nuclear materials for peaceful purposes is a legitimate and important national goal. It has entrusted the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with the primary Federal responsibility for achieving that goal. The NRC`s mission, therefore, is to regulate the Nation`s civilian use of byproduct, source, and special nuclear materials to ensure adequate protection of public health and safety, to promote the common defense and security, and to protect the environment. The NRC`s FY 1998 budget requests new budget authority of $481,300,000 to be funded by two appropriations - one is the NRC`s Salaraies and Expenses appropriation for $476,500,000, and the other is NRC`s Office of Inspector General appropriation for $4,800,000. Of the funds appropriated to the NRC`s Salaries and Expenses, $17,000,000, shall be derived from the Nuclear Waste Fund and $2,000,000 shall be derived from general funds. The proposed FY 1998 appropriation legislation would also exempt the $2,000,000 for regulatory reviews and other assistance provided to the Department of Energy from the requirement that the NRC collect 100 percent of its budget from fees. The sums appropriated to the NRC`s Salaries and Expenses and NRC`s Office of Inspector General shall be reduced by the amount of revenues received during FY 1998 from licensing fees, inspection services, and other services and collections, so as to result in a final FY 1998 appropriation for the NRC of an estimated $19,000,000 - the amount appropriated from the Nuclear Waste Fund and from general funds. Revenues derived from enforcement actions shall be deposited to miscellaneous receipts of the Treasury.
Date: February 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Limits on linearity of missile allocation optimization

Description: Optimizations of missile allocation based on linearized exchange equations produce accurate allocations, but the limits of validity of the linearization are not known. These limits are explored in the context of the upload of weapons by one side to initially small, equal forces of vulnerable and survivable weapons. The analysis compares analytic and numerical optimizations and stability induces based on aggregated interactions of the two missile forces, the first and second strikes they could deliver, and they resulting costs. This note discusses the costs and stability indices induced by unilateral uploading of weapons to an initially symmetrical low force configuration. These limits are quantified for forces with a few hundred missiles by comparing analytic and numerical optimizations of first strike costs. For forces of 100 vulnerable and 100 survivable missiles on each side, the analytic optimization agrees closely with the numerical solution. For 200 vulnerable and 200 survivable missiles on each side, the analytic optimization agrees with the induces to within about 10%, but disagrees with the allocation of the side with more weapons by about 50%. The disagreement comes from the interaction of the possession of more weapons with the shift of allocation from missiles to value that they induce.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Canavan, G. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Risk-based prioritization of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Programs

Description: This paper describes an application of a formal prioritization system to help the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) allocate funds for environmental projects. The system, known as the Laboratory Integration and Prioritization System (LIPS), was jointly developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the US Department of Energy (DOE). LIPS is based on a formal approach for multi-criteria decision-making known as multiattribute utility analysis. The system is designed to provide a logical, practical, and equitable means for estimating and comparing the benefits to be obtained from funding project work.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Anderson, R.G.; Merkhofer, M.W.; Voth, M. & Sire, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Safety culture management: The importance of organizational factors

Description: The concept of safety culture has been used extensively to explain the underlying causes of performance based events, both positive and negative, across the nuclear industry. The work described in this paper represents several years of effort to identify, define and assess the organizational factors important to safe performance in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The research discussed in this paper is primarily conducted in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) efforts in understanding the impact of organizational performance on safety. As a result of a series of research activities undertaken by numerous NRC contractors, a collection of organizational dimensions has been identified and defined. These dimensions represent what is believed to be a comprehensive taxonomy of organizational elements that relate to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Techniques were also developed by which to measure these organizational dimensions, and include structured interview protocols, behavioral checklists, and behavioral anchored rating scales (BARS). Recent efforts have focused on devising a methodology for the extraction of information related to the identified organizational dimensions from existing NRC documentation. This type of effort would assess the applicability of the organizational dimensions to existing NRC inspection and evaluation reports, refine the organizational dimensions previously developed so they are more relevant to the task of retrospective analysis, and attempt to rate plants based on the review of existing NRC documentation using the techniques previously developed for the assessment of organizational dimensions.
Date: May 1, 1995
Creator: Haber, S.B.; Shurberg, D.A.; Jacobs, R. & Hofmann, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The implications of deregulation for biomass and renewable energy in California

Description: California has been leading the nation down the path of electric utility deregulation, beginning with the April 1994, California Public Utilities Commission`s (CPUC) Blue Book restructuring proposal. The road for renewable energy producers has been particularly rocky, leaving the future of renewable energy production very much in doubt. The original CPUC proposal provided for competition among generating sources on the basis of price alone, without regard for environmental considerations. The California legislature took up electric utility deregulation legislation during 1996, culminating in AB 1890, California`s landmark restructuring legislation, which was passed unanimously by the Senate and Assembly, and signed into law by the governor on September 28, 1996. AB 1890 assigned to the California Energy Commission (CEC) the task of determining how to allocate the renewables transition funds between existing and new renewable generating sources, and among the various renewable energy technologies that are available for deployment in California. The California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal/EPA) was assigned the task of reporting to the legislature about the specific benefits provided by biomass energy production in California, and about policies that could shift some of the cost of biomass energy production away from the electric ratepayer, on to beneficiaries of the environmental benefits of biomass energy production. This study describes the development of the CEC and Cal/EPA reports to the California legislature, and provides an analysis of the major issues that were encountered during the course of their development. The study concludes with a consideration of the future prospects for biomass and renewable energy production in the state.
Date: July 1, 1998
Creator: Morris, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The implications of deregulation for biomass and renewable energy in California. Revision

Description: The California legislature took up electric utility deregulation legislation during 1996, culminating in AB 1890, California`s landmark restructuring legislation. The legislation created a transition funding program for renewables. No permanent program for the support of renewable energy production extending beyond the end of the transition period (2002) is included in AB 1890. AB 1890 assigned to the California Energy Commission (CEC) the task of determining how to allocate the renewables transition funds between existing and new renewable generating sources, and among the various renewable energy technologies that are available for deployment in California. The California Environmental Protection Agency (Cal/EPA) was assigned the task of reporting to the legislature about the specific benefits provided by biomass energy production in California, and about policies that could shift some of the cost of biomass energy production away from the electric ratepayer, on to beneficiaries of the environmental benefits of biomass energy production. This study describes the development of the CEC and Cal/EPA reports to the California legislature, and provides an analysis of the major issues that were encountered during the course of their development. The study concludes with a consideration of the future prospects for biomass and renewable energy production in the state.
Date: August 1, 1998
Creator: Morris, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Douglas United Nuclear, Inc., sponsored research and development programs, FY-1967

Description: Douglas United Nuclear, Inc., has allocated to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory $542,000 of 02 Research and Development funds and $455,000 of Process Technology funds for FY-1967. Of these, $392,000 of 02 Research and Development funds and $420,000 of Process Technology funds are the responsibility of the Research and Engineering Section. The balance in each case is the responsibility of the Production Fuels Section. Representatives of these Sections have met with Pacific Northwest Laboratory personnel to develop programs to be undertaken in FY-1967. This document briefly summarizes the results of the discussions and delineates the work to be accomplished.
Date: July 12, 1966
Creator: Reid, R.W. & Stringer, J.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department