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The Association Between Testing Strategies and Performance in College Algebra, Attitude Towards Mathematics, and Attrition Rate

Description: The purposes of the study were: (1) to determine the effects of four testing strategies upon performance in college algebra, attitude towards mathematics, and attrition rate; (2) to determine the effects of two types of frequent testing upon performance, attitude, and attrition rate, (3) to determine the effects of different frequencies of in-class testing upon performance, attitude, and attrition rate; and (4) to draw conclusions which might help in selecting testing methods for college algebra classes.
Date: May 1987
Creator: Johnson, Charles W. (Charles Windle)
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effects of Instructional Methods on Student Performance in Postsecondary Developmental Mathematics

Description: This study examined success rates and end-of-semester grades for three instructional methods used in developmental algebra and college algebra. The methods investigated were traditional lecture, laboratory, and computer mediated learning. The population included the 10,095 students who had enrolled in developmental algebra and college algebra at Richland College in Dallas, Texas, for five semesters. Success was defined as earning a grade of A, B, C, or D in a course.
Date: May 1999
Creator: Hernandez, Celeste Peyton
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Influence of an Interdisciplinary Course on Critical Thinking Skills

Description: The effect of an interdisciplinary algebra/science course on students' critical thinking skills was examined. A traditional college algebra course was used as a comparison group. The students in the sample enrolled in college algebra and then half were randomly placed into the interdisciplinary course. A quasi-experimental pretest-posttest comparison group design was used. The Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal was used to measure the students' critical thinking skills. This instrument consists of an overall critical thinking score as well as five subscores in the areas of Inference, Recognition of Assumptions, Deduction, Interpretation and Evaluation of Arguments. It was found that the students in the interdisciplinary course made greater gains in the overall critical thinking score as well as in four of the five subscores. However, the differences in the gains made in the two courses were not statistically significant. Disregarding course, other factors that were found to be closely related to critical thinking were Composite ACT, grade received in the course, Math ACT and grade point average. It was also found that students whose majors were in the Schools of Arts and Letters or Science and Technology scored higher on critical thinking than students whose majors were in the Schools of Business or Education. Factors found to have no relationship to critical thinking were ethnicity, gender and classification.
Date: August 1999
Creator: Elliott, Brett M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Design, Development, and Implementation of a Computer-Based Graphics Presentation for the Undergraduate Teaching of Functions and Graphing

Description: The problems with which this study was concerned were threefold: (a) to design a computer-based graphics presentation on the topics of functions and graphing, (b) to develop the presentation, and (c) to determine the instructional effectiveness of this computer-based graphics instruction. The computerized presentation was written in Authorware for the Macintosh computer. The population of this study consisted of three intermediate algebra classes at Collin County Community College (n = 51). A standardized examination, the Descriptive Tests of Mathematics Skills for Functions and Graphs, was used for pretest and posttest purposes. Means were calculated on these scores and compared using a t-test for correlated means. The level of significance was set at .01. The results of the data analysis indicated: 1. There was a significant difference between the pretest and posttest performance after exposure to the computer-based graphics presentation. 2. There was no significant gender difference between the pretest and posttest performance after exposure to the computer-based graphics presentation. 3. There was no significant difference between the pretest and posttest performance of the traditional and nontraditional age students after exposure to the computer-based graphics presentation. Females had a lower posttest score than the mean male posttest score, but an analysis of the differences showed no significance. Traditional age students had a higher posttest performance score than the mean traditional age student posttest score, but their pretest performance scores were higher as well. An analysis of the differences showed no significance. In summary, this computer-based graphics presentation was an effective teaching technique for increasing mathematics performance.
Date: December 1996
Creator: Karr, Rosemary McCroskey
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effects of Web-Based Learning Versus Traditional Instructor-Based Learning on Student Knowledge and Satisfaction Based on Student Learning Styles

Description: The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of Web-based learning (WBL) versus those of traditional instructor-based learning (IBL) on student knowledge and satisfaction based on student learning styles. Other goals were to determine if WBL is more effective for those with a particular learning style. The study examined a sample of undergraduate students who were enrolled in the college algebra offered as both oncampus instructor-based (traditional) and Web-based at the university of North Texas (UNT). A total of 36 Web-based students and 58 instructor-based students participated in this study. This study utilized a posttest-only intact group. The Kolb Learning Style Inventory (LSI) measured the learning styles of students. This study used learning methods (Web-based learning (WBL), instructor-based learning (IBL)), and learning styles (Diverger, Converger, Assimilator, and Accommodator) as independent variables. Student knowledge and student satisfaction was measured at the end of the course as independent variables. Based upon the results of the LSI, post-learning exam, and satisfaction a series of two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA 4x2) techniques and independent variable tests was used for each of the dependent variables, knowledge and satisfaction, based on a student's learning styles. The results revealed that students' learning styles were statistically significant for knowledge when learning on the Web versus instructor-led. In addition, the learning style was important factor for Web-based learning. The results indicated students with Assimilator and Converger as learning styles received better result with the Web-based learning method. Furthermore, this study found there is significant difference in student satisfaction based on learning on the Web versus instructor-led. The outcome of the study could be of particular interest in educational institutions; especially those that want to transfer some of their traditional courses onto the Web. The finding also has implications for training organizations as they seek efficient and effective ...
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Date: December 2001
Creator: Manochehri, Naser
Partner: UNT Libraries

Comparing and contrasting college algebra success rates in traditional versus eight-week courses at a specific community college: A single institution case study.

Description: There is a need to understand the relationship between, the traditional 16-week versus an 8-week, and college-level mathematics success rates. This study applied chi-square (χ2) and analysis of variance to compare and contrast which course length of time, 8-weeks or 16-weeks, for college algebra resulted in a higher proportion of students successfully completing the course. In addition, success rates among ethnicities, gender, and age groups were also examined. The population sample for this study was 231 students enrolled in college algebra from fall 2004 through fall 2007. Data was analyzed on four sections of the traditional 16-week courses and four sections of 8-week courses. Success was defined as earning a grade of A, B, or C in the course. The study found that overall there was no significant difference in success rates for the 8-week and 16-week college algebra courses. However, significant differences were found in success rates among Asian, Pacific Islander students enrolled in the 8-week and 16-week courses. No significant differences in success rates were found for White, Non-Hispanic; African-American, and Hispanic, Mexican American students. There was a significant difference in the number of A's, B's, C's, D's and F's among White, Non-Hispanic students, but there was no difference in A's, B's, C's, D's or F's for African-American; Hispanic, Mexican American and Asian, Pacific Islander. When considering success rates among genders, no difference was found in success rates for males or females who were enrolled in the 8-week and 16-week college algebra courses. There were a significant greater number of students in the age group (23-30) who were successful in the 16-week college algebra course than in the 8-week college algebra course. However, no differences in success rates were found in the age groups (18-22) and (31-40).
Date: August 2008
Creator: Reyes, Czarina S.
Partner: UNT Libraries