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Effects of Long-Term Moderate Ethanol Intake on the Stress Response in Rats

Description: The effect of ethanol on the stress response in rats was examined. Experimental animals were given 0.25 ml of 28 percent ethanol or 0.25 ml of water orally once a day, five days a week, for a period of twelve months and were then subjected to fifteen minute cold stress. Corticosterone levels in ethanol-treated males following stress were significantly lower (22 percent) than in the sham group. Adrenal weights in sham-treated females were significantly higher (15 percent) than in the ethanol group at the end of twelve months. Mortality in sham-treated males was significantly higher (60 percent) than in ethanol-treated males. The effects observed may be due to the sedative action of ethanol on cortical centers controlling the hypothalmus.
Date: December 1984
Creator: Williams, Judy L. (Judy Lee)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effects of Long Term Modernate Ethanol Intake on Plasma Levels of ACTH, Beta Endorphin, and Corticosterone in Rats

Description: The effects of single injections and daily oral administration of ethanol on plasma levels of ACTH, beta endorphin, and corticosterone in response to cold stress were examined. The long-term experimental animals were given 0.25 ml of 28% ethanol or water orally once a day, five days a week, for fourteen months. Plasma levels of ACTH, beta endorphin, and corticosterone were lower in alcohol-treated rats as compared with water-treated rats when exposed to cold stress. The effects of a single injection of ethanol significantly elevated plasma levels of all three hormones. Mortality in sham-treated males was higher than ethanol-treated.
Date: December 1990
Creator: Breedlove, Kenneth
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effects of Long Term Moderate Ethanol Intake on the Immune Response in Rats

Description: Using a rat model, the effects of a single dose or six to twelve months of daily oral administration of ethanol on the immune system were determined. The rats were challenged with sheep red blood cells after the various dosing periods to elicit an immune response. Immune system responsiveness was determined by means of white blood cell counts and differentials, antibody titers, and T-cell numbers. No deleterious effects of the ethanol on the immune response were seen, while the female alcohol-fed rats showed a significant increase in T-Cell numbers, white blood cell counts, and lymphocytes over the sham group.
Date: August 1991
Creator: Follin, Cynthia A. (Cynthia Ann)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effect of Long-Term Moderate Amounts of Ethanol on Paraventricular Nuclei Activity on Cold Stressed Adult Rats

Description: The effects of moderate, long-term intake of ethanol on the hypothalamic response to cold stress were examined. The long-term experimental animals were given .25 ml of 28% ethanol or .25 ml of water orally once a day, five days a week for fourteen months. A stainless steel electrode was then surgically implanted into the paraventricular nucleus, after which the animal was subjected to cold stress (-150 C, 10 min.). Recordings were taken in the forms of frequency and activity. The data clearly indicate that: (1) alcohol fed rats exhibited a suppressed response to cold stress compared to sham-fed rats; (2) this suppression of activity occurred at the level of the hypothalamus, and (3) mortality was significantly lower in alcohol-fed males than it was in sham fed males. This study clearly points out the need for further work in the area of the beneficial effects of moderate doses of alcohol.
Date: December 1990
Creator: McKinnon, Mark S. (Mark Steven)
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effects of Chronic Ethanol Intake on the Allosteric Interaction Between GABA and Benzodiazepine at the GABAA Receptor

Description: This study examined the effects of chronic ethanol intake on the density, affinity, and allosteric modulation of rat brain GABAA receptor subtypes. In the presence of GABA, the apparent affinity for the benzodiazepine agonist flunitrazepam was increased and for the inverse agonist R015-4513 was decreased. No alteration in the capacity of GABA to modulate flunitrazepam and R015-4513 binding was observed in membranes prepared from cortex, hippocampus or cerebellum following chronic ethanol intake or withdrawal. The results also demonstrate two different binding sites for [3H]RO 15-4513 in rat cerebellum that differ in their affinities for diazepam. Chronic ethanol treatment and withdrawal did not significantly change the apparent affinity or density of these two receptor subtypes.
Date: May 1992
Creator: Chen, Jianping
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effect of Post-resistance Exercise Alcohol Ingestion on LPS-stimulated Cytokines

Description: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of post-resistance exercise alcohol ingestion on LPS-stimulated production of IFNγ, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10. Recreationally resistance-trained men (n = 10, 25 ± 3 yr, 177 ± 7 cm, 83.8 ± 15.7 kg, 14.8 ± 8.5% body fat) and women (n = 8, 23 ± 2 yr, 161 ± 3 cm, 59.5 ± 6.0 kg, 26.5 ± 3.0% body fat) completed the study. Participants visited the laboratory for an initial visit at which time they were screened, familiarized with procedures, and had their 1-repetition maximum (1RM) back squat tested. Subsequently, participants visited the laboratory 2 more times and completed 2 identical heavy resistance exercise bouts (6 sets of 10 repetitions of 80% 1RM back squat) after which a beverage, either containing alcohol (alcohol condition, ALC; 1.09 g EtOH per kg fat free mass) or water (placebo condition, PLA), was administered. Blood samples were collected before exercise (PRE), and at 3 hours (3h) and 5 hours (5h) after exercise. Samples were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and cultured overnight. Supernatant was collected and analyzed for IFNγ, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10. A significant (p < 0.05) main effect for time was found for IFNγ, TNF-α, and IL-1β (5h greater than PRE) and for IL-10 (5h less than PRE and 3h, 3h less than PRE). An interaction effect was found for IL-8 (ALC less than PLA at 5h) and for IL-6 (ALC greater than PLA at PRE and ALC less than PLA at 3h). For IL-6, ALC was less at 3h than at PRE, and PLA was greater at 3h than at PRE. Overall, the LPS-stimulated cytokine response was pro-inflammatory by 5h. Alcohol consumed after heavy resistance exercise reduced LPS-stimulated production of IL-6 and IL-8 but not of IFNγ, TNF-α, IL-1β, ...
Date: August 2015
Creator: Levitt, Danielle E.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effect of Acute Alcohol Ingestion on Resistance Exercise Induced mTORC1 Signaling in Human Muscle

Description: The purpose of this project was to further elucidate the effects post-exercise alcohol ingestion. This project had many novel aspects including using a resistance exercise (RE) only exercise design and the inclusion of women. To our knowledge, we are the first to investigate the effect of post-RE alcohol ingestion in women. In the first chapter of this project, information on the prevalence of alcohol use and the importance of skeletal muscle as a dynamic and metabolic tissue was provided. In chapter two, the effects of post-RE alcohol ingestion in men and women are detailed. The major findings of this study was that although RE elicited similar mTORC1 signaling both in men and in women, alcohol ingestion appeared to only attenuate RE-induced phosphorylation of the mTORC1 signaling pathway in men. The third chapter focused on examining the effects of post-RE alcohol ingestion on acute testosterone bioavailability. The primary findings of this study was that alcohol substantially elevated serum total and free testosterone concentrations during recovery from a bout of resistance exercise. The fourth chapter detailed factors that contribute to bone density in men. The major findings of this study was that young adult male long-distance runners who participated in resistance training at least once per week had greater bone mineral density than their non-resistance trained and non-exercise trained peers.
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Date: August 2015
Creator: Duplanty, Anthony A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Neuronal Network Analyses in vitro of Acute Individual and Combined Responses to Fluoxetine and Ethanol

Description: Embryonic murine neuronal networks cultured on microelectrode arrays were used to quantify acute electrophysiological effects of fluoxetine and ethanol. Spontaneously active frontal cortex cultures showed highly repeatable, dose-dependent sensitivities to both compounds. Cultures began to respond to fluoxetine at 3 µM and were shut off at 10-16 µM. EC50s mean ± S.D. for spike and burst rates were 4.1 ± 1.5 µM and 4.5 ± 1.1 µM (n=14). The fluoxetine inhibition was reversible and without effect on action potential wave shapes. Ethanol showed initial inhibition at 20 mM, with spike and burst rate EC50s at 52.0 ± 17.4 mM and 56.0 ± 17.0 mM (n=15). Ethanol concentrations above 100 -140 mM led to cessation of activity. Although ethanol did not change the shape and amplitude of action potentials, unit specific effects were found. The combined application of ethanol and fluoxetine was additive. Ethanol did not potentiate the effect of fluoxetine.
Date: August 2002
Creator: Xia,Yun
Partner: UNT Libraries

Evaluation of Ethanol’s Effects on the Biophysical Characteristics of Licking

Description: Alcohol use disorders are a public health issue related to adverse effects for individuals and society. A low level of response, or decreased sensitivity, to alcohol has been identified as a heritable risk factor for development of alcohol use disorders. One method for researching level of response to alcohol is through the use of rodent models, which are developed to mimic human conditions while eliminating barriers to conducting research with people. Current rodent models used to evaluate effects of ethanol on motor performance have been criticized for not being well matched to human tasks that measure level of change in body sway after alcohol consumption. This study looks at oromotor behavior as a potential alternative to gross motor performance in hopes of increasing correspondence between human and rodent measures of intoxication. To evaluate rodent oromotor performance a force transducer lickometer is used to measure several dimensions of licking behavior after administration of different concentrations of ethanol solution via gavage. Results show that force of licking is not sensitive to dose of ethanol. The total number of licks per session show dose related decreases and licking rhythm, evaluated by the length and distribution of interlick intervals, either increased or decreased for three of the four subjects. Recommendations are made for procedural modifications in order to reduce variability in data and further investigate oromotor performance and level of response to alcohol.
Date: December 2014
Creator: Stewart, Daryl Ellen
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effect of Ethanol on Cardiac Activity and Brain Respiration in Chick Embryos

Description: This study concerned the effect of ethanol on cardiac activity and brain respiration in chick embryos. Ethanol dosages tested ranged from 1.0 mg to 4.0 mg/g weight. Each experiment lasted at least 150 minutes. Cardiac activity in terms of total waveform energies was integrated and printed out for plotting and analysis. The embryonic heart rates were simultaneously determined from physical graph tracings. The embryonic brain respiration was measured using a differential microrespirometer. The effect of ethanol on cardiac activity was one of slight (10 to 13), but statistically significant (p<.05) rate depression. The brain slices exhibited a marked, immediate, and irreversible decrease (39 to 89%) in oxygen consumption at both ethanol dosages. The data indicated that chick embryonic brain tissues were more susceptible to alcohol effects than cardiac tissue. Therefore, the mental abnormalities seen in the offspring of alcoholic mothers may be more cerebral in nature than cardiovascular.
Date: August 1976
Creator: Newman, James J.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effect of Chronic Alcohol Abuse and Resistance Training on the Skeletal Muscle Androgen Receptor Concentration of Rats

Description: The purpose was to examine the effect of chronic alcohol abuse on the androgen receptor content (AR) in skeletal muscle, and to determine if this effect was influenced by resistance training. Thirty-four male rats (456 ± 1 g; mean ± SE) were divided into 4 groups: Sham exercise-Ethanol, Sham exercise-Normal diet, Exercise-Ethanol, and Exercise-Normal diet. Both Exercise groups underwent a 6-week "squat" resistance training protocol and both Ethanol groups received an alcohol-rich diet throughout the 6-week period. Western blot analysis showed no effect of alcohol or resistance training on the AR of the extensor digitorum longus. For the rectus femoris, alcohol caused a decline in the AR (p=0.01). This reduction was not attenuated by resistance training. The AR of the soleus was not affected by chronic alcohol abuse alone; however, the resistance training induced increase in the AR was prevented by chronic alcohol abuse (p=0.03).
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Date: August 2004
Creator: Vingren, Jakob L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Enkephalin Hydrolysing Activity in Alcoholism and Related Changes in Mood and Ability to Perform a Biofeedback/Relaxation Task

Description: Evidence linking the development of chronic alcoholism with endogenous opioid peptides is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on enkephalin metabolism with respect to its involvement in the development of addiction and stress-related psychophysiological changes. The study was concerned with enkephalin hydrolysing activity (EHA) in chronic alcoholism as well as the mood changes that reportedly accompany alcoholism. Also of interest was the relationship of enkephalin degradation to voluntary relaxation.
Date: August 1984
Creator: Benoit, Larry J.
Partner: UNT Libraries