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[Memorandum of Meeting: Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, August 6, 2006]

Description: Attachment to August 6, 2005 Memorandum of Meeting regarding Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi. Includes: Responses to Requests for Additional Data Regarding Keesler Medical Center; Rep. Gene Taylor Analysis of Cost and Savings Estimates for Recommendation to Disestablish Inpatient Services at Keesler; Minutes of the Medica.1 Joint Cross-Service Group Meetings of July 2,2004 and January 4,2005; Site Visit Reports, Minutes, and Recommendations from the CARES Commission Regarding Veterans Affairs Medical Facilities in Biloxi and Gulfport and Arrangements with Keesler Medical Center; Articles from the New England Journal of Medicine and from MSNBC Regarding Medical Personnel and Training Needs for Wartime; Rep. Gene Taylor Analysis of Cost and Savings Estimates for Recommendation to Close Naval Station Pascagoula; Department of Defense Report: Strategy for Homeland Defense and Civil Support, June 2005; March 9,2005 Testimony of Gen. Bantz J. Craddock, Commander of U.S. Southern Command.
Date: August 6, 2005
Creator: United States. Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Acceptance test report, 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System, Phase 3 testing

Description: This document summarizes the results of the phase 3 acceptance test of the 241-SY-101 Flexible Receiver System (FRS). The purpose of this acceptance test is to verify the sealing integrity of the FRS to ensure that the release of waste and aerosols will be minimized during the removal of the test mixer pump from Tank 241-SY-101. The FRS is one of six major components of the Equipment Removal System, which has been designed to retrieve, transport, and store the mixer pump. This acceptance test was performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 area from January 10, 1995 to January 17, 1995. The Phase 3 test consisted of two parts. Part one was a water leak test of the seal between the blast shield and mock load distribution frame (LDF) to ensure that significant contamination of the pump pit and waste interaction with the aluminum impact-limiting material under the LDF are prevented during the pump removal operation. The second part of this acceptance test was an air leak test of the assembled flexible receiver system. The purpose of this test was to verify that the release of hazardous aerosols will be minimized if the tank dome pressure becomes slightly positive during the decontamination of the mixer pump.
Date: February 6, 1995
Creator: Ritter, G.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ADVANCED EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

Description: The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs, or air toxics) from coal-fired boilers. The project goal is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouses), and wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) systems. Development work initially concentrated on the capture of trace metals, fine particulate, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen fluoride. Recent work has focused almost exclusively on the control of mercury emissions.
Date: February 6, 2001
Creator: Farthing, G.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Overflow of Radioactive Water from K Basins

Description: This report documents the dose calculations for the postulated K Basin overflow accident using current methods to model the environmental doses for radioactive releases into the Columbia River and the air.
Date: October 6, 1999
Creator: RITTMANN, P.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of ultraviolet radiation, ozone and aerosol interactions in the troposphere using automatic differentiation. Final report

Description: A major goal of this research was to quantify the interactions between UVR, ozone and aerosols. One method of quantification was to calculate sensitivity coefficients. A novel aspect of this work was the use of Automatic Differentiation software to calculate the sensitivities. The authors demonstrated the use of ADIFOR for the first time in a dimensional framework. Automatic Differentiation was used to calculate such quantities as: sensitivities of UV-B fluxes to changes in ozone and aerosols in the stratosphere and the troposphere; changes in ozone production/destruction rates to changes in UV-B flux; aerosol properties including loading, scattering properties (including relative humidity effects), and composition (mineral dust, soot, and sulfate aerosol, etc.). The combined radiation/chemistry model offers an important test of the utility of Automatic Differentiation as a tool in atmospheric modeling.
Date: October 6, 1998
Creator: Carmichael, G.R. & Potra, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report on sampling and analysis of air at trenches 218-W-4C and218-W-5 {number_sign}31 of the low level burial grounds

Description: This report presents analytical results of air samples collected from trenches at the Low Level Burial Grounds. The samples were collected with SUMMA canisters and were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using a modified EPA TO-14 procedure. The data suggest that the vent pipes of the 218-W-4C trenches had elevated concentrations of volatile organic compounds. The ambient air samples collected at the 218-W-5 {number_sign}31 facility, an open trench that does not contain any waste at this time, did not show any target compounds above the method detection limit.
Date: October 6, 1997
Creator: Stauffer, M, Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation and demonstration of dry carbon-based sorbent injection for mercury control. Quarterly technical report, July 1, 1996--September 31, 1996

Description: The overall objective of this two phase program is to investigate the use of dry carbon-based sorbents for mercury control. This information is important to the utility industry in anticipation of pending regulations. During Phase I, a bench-scale field test device that can be configured as an electrostatic precipitator, a pulse-jet baghouse, or a reverse-gas baghouse has been designed, built and integrated with an existing pilot-scale facility at PSCo`s Comanche Station. Up to three candidate sorbents will be injected into the flue gas stream upstream of the test device to and mercury concentration measurements will be made to determine the mercury removal efficiency for each sorbent. During the Phase II effort, component integration for the most promising dry sorbent technology shall be tested at the 5000 acfm pilot-scale.
Date: November 6, 1996
Creator: Hunt, T.; Sjostrom, S. & Smith, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LLNL NESHAPs 1996 Annual Report

Description: This annual report is prepared pursuant to the National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart H; Subpart H governs radionuclide emissions to air from Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. NESHAPs limits the emission of radionuclides to the ambient air from DOE facilities to levels resulting in an annual effective dose equivalent (EDE) of 10 mrem (10 microsieverts) to any member of the public. The EDEs for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) site-wide maximally exposed members of the public from 1996 operations were (1) Livermore site: 0. 093 mrem (0.93 microsievert) (52% from point-source emissions, 48% from diffuse-source emissions); (2) Site 300: 0.033 mrem (0.33 microsievert) (99% from point-source, 1% from diffuse-source emissions). The EDEs were generally calculated using the EPA-approved CAP88-PC air-dispersion/dose-assessment model. Site-specific meteorological data, stack flow data, and emissions estimates based on radionuclide inventory data or continuous-monitoring systems data were the specific input to CAP88-PC for each modeled source. 5 figs., 8 tabs.
Date: January 6, 1997
Creator: Gallegos, G.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense Facilities. Semiannual technical progress report, March 28, 1997--September 27, 1997

Description: The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), through an Interagency Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated a three-phase program with the Consortium for Coal-Water Slurry Fuel Technology, with the aim of developing technologies which can potentially decrease DOD`s reliance on imported oil by increasing its use of coal. The program is being conducted as a cooperative agreement between the Consortium and DOE. Phase I was completed on November 1, 1995. Work in Phase II focused on emissions reductions, coal beneficiation/preparation studies, and economic analyses of coal use. Emissions reductions investigations included performing pilot-scale air toxics (i.e., trace elements and volatile organic compounds) testing and evaluating a ceramic filtering device on the demonstration boiler. Also, a sodium bicarbonate duct injection system was installed on the demonstration boiler. An economic analysis was conducted which investigated the benefits of decreased dependence on imported oil by using new coal combustion technologies. Work related to coal preparation and utilization was primarily focused on preparing the final report. Work in Phase III focused on coal preparation studies, pilot-scale NO{sub x} reduction studies, economic analyses of coal use, and evaluation of deeply-cleaned coal as boiler fuel. Coal preparation studies were focused on continuing activities on particle size control, physical separations, and surface-based separation processes. The evaluation of deeply-cleaned coal as boiler fuel included receiving three cleaned coals from Cyprus-Amax.
Date: January 6, 1998
Creator: Miller, B.G.; Miller, S.F. & Morrison, J.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

REDUCTION OF INHERENT MERCURY EMISSIONS IN PC COMBUSTION

Description: Mercury emission compliance presents one of the major potential challenges raised by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Simple ways of controlling emissions have not been identified. The variability in the field data suggest that inherent mercury emissions may be reduced if the source of this inherent capture can be identified and controlled. The key mechanisms appear to involve the oxidation of mercury to Hg{sup 2}, generally producing the more reactive HgCl{sub 2}, followed by its capture by certain components of the fly ash or char, or in the air pollution control equipment. This research focuses on identifying the rate-limiting steps associated with the oxidation step. Work in this reporting period focused on the refinement of the rate constants used in the kinetic mechanism for mercury oxidation. The possible reactions leading to mercury oxidation are reviewed. Rate constants for these reactions are discussed, using both literature sources and detailed estimates. The resulting mechanism represents the best present picture of the overall chlorine homogeneous oxidation chemistry. Application of this mechanism to the data will be explored in the subsequent reporting period. Work conducted under the present grant has been the subject of two meeting papers presented during the reporting period (Sliger et al., 1998a,b).
Date: August 6, 1999
Creator: Kramlich, John C.; Sliger, Rebecca N. & Going, David J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of natural radionuclides for determination of tropospheric ozone and aerosol transport.

Description: Natural radionuclides have been proposed for use in assessing the transport of ozone and aerosols in the troposphere. For example, {sup 7}Be is known to be produced in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere by interactions with cosmogenic particles. Beryllium-7 has a 53.28-day half-life and is a gamma emitter that attaches itself to fine particles in the atmosphere once it is formed. Indeed, in tropospheric aerosol samples TBe is typically found in association with aerosol particles that are 0.3 {micro}m in diameter. Some investigators have asserted that ozone from aloft can be transported into rural and urban regions during stratospheric/tropospheric folding events, leading to increased background levels of ozone. During the Texas 2000 Air Quality study, aerosol samples with a 2.5-{micro}m cutoff were collected during 12-hour cycles (day/night) for a 30-day period at the Deer Park, Texas, field site in August-September 2000. To monitor {sup 7}Be levels, high-volume samples were collected on glass fiber filters on Julian dates 225-259. Sample collection was at a field site near a city park, away from any nearby traffic. This site is under routine operation by the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission. Instruments operated at this same site during the study period included an ozone monitor (Dasibi), a nitrogen oxides instrument (API), a CO instrument (API), a nephelometer, a UV-B meter (Richardson-Berger), and a multifilter rotating shadow band radiometer (MFRSR, Yankee Environmental Systems). In addition, we made modified fast-response NO{sub 2} and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) measurements by using a fast gas chromatography with luminol detection, to be described at this meeting (3). The results for {sup 7}Be (mBq m{sup {minus}3})are compared in Figure 1 with the maximum and average ozone values (ppb) observed at the site to identify potential correlations. In Figure 2, all of the {sup 7}Be data are plotted against the maximum ...
Date: December 6, 2000
Creator: Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Drayton, P. J. & Orlandini, K. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy-Smart Building Choices: How Parents and Teachers Are Helping to Create Better Environments for Learning

Description: Most K-12 schools could save 25% of their energy costs by being smart about energy. Nationwide, the savings potential is $6 billion. While improving energy use in buildings and busses, schools are likely to create better places for teaching and learning, with better lighting, temperature control, acoustics, and air quality. This brochure, targeted to parents and teachers, describes how schools can become more energy efficient.
Date: August 6, 2001
Creator: Team, Energy Smart Schools
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Biological Kraft Chemical Recycle for Augmentation of Recovery Furnace Capacity

Description: The chemicals used in pulping of wood by the kraft process are recycled in the mill in the recovery furnace, which oxidizes organics while simultaneously reducing sulfate to sulfide. The recovery furnace is central to the economical operation of kraft pulp mills, but it also causes problems. The total pulp production of many mills is limited by the recovery furnace capacity, which cannot easily be increased. The furnace is one of the largest sources of air pollution (as reduced sulfur compounds) in the kraft pulp mill.
Date: December 6, 2001
Creator: Strand, Stuart E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of an Absorption Heat Pump to Mitigate Plant Capacity Reduction Due to Ambient Temperature Rise for an Air-Cooled Ammonia and Water Cycle: Preprint

Description: Air-cooled geothermal plants suffer substantial decreases in generating capacity at increased ambient temperatures. As the ambient temperature rises by 50 F above a design value of 50 F, at low brine-resource temperatures, the decrease in generating capacity can be more than 50%. This decrease is caused primarily by increased condenser pressure. Using mixed-working fluids has recently drawn considerable attention for use in power cycles. Such cycles are more readily amenable to use of absorption ''heat pumps.'' For a system that uses ammonia and water as the mixed-working fluid, this paper evaluates using an absorption heat pump to reduce condenser backpressure. At high ambient temperatures, part of the turbine exhaust vapor is absorbed into a circulating mixed stream in an absorber in series with the main condenser. This steam is pumped up to a higher pressure and heated to strip the excess vapor, which is recondensed using an additional air-cooled condenser. The operating conditions are chosen to reconstitute this condensate back to the same concentration as drawn from the original system. We analyzed two power plants of nominal 1-megawatt capacity. The design resource temperatures were 250 F and 300 F. Ambient temperature was allowed to rise from a design value of 50 F to 100 F. The analyses indicate that using an absorption heat pump is feasible. For the 300 F resource, an increased brine flow of 30% resulted in a net power increase of 21%. For the 250 F resource, the increase was smaller. However, these results are highly plant- and equipment-specific because evaluations must be carried out at off-design conditions for the condenser. Such studies should be carried out for specific power plants that suffer most from increased ambient temperatures.
Date: August 6, 2001
Creator: Bharathan, D. & Nix, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy-Smart Building Choices: How School Facilities Managers and Business Officials Are Reducing Operating Costs and Saving Money

Description: Most K-12 schools could save 25% of their energy costs by being smart about energy. Nationwide, the savings potential is $6 billion. While improving energy use in buildings and busses, schools are likely to create better places for teaching and learning, with better lighting, temperature control, acoustics, and air quality. This brochure, targeted to school facilities managers and business officials, describes how schools can become more energy efficient.
Date: August 6, 2001
Creator: Team, Energy Smart Schools
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

REDUCTION OF INHERENT MERCURY EMISSIONS IN PC COMBUSTION

Description: Mercury emission compliance presents one of the major potential challenges raised by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Simple ways of controlling emissions have not been identified. The variability in the field data suggest that inherent mercury emissions may be reduced if the source of this inherent capture can be identified and controlled. The key mechanisms appear to involve the oxidation of mercury to Hg{sup 2}, generally producing the more reactive HgCl{sub 2}, followed by its capture by certain components of the fly ash or char, or in the air pollution control equipment. This research focuses on identifying the rate-limiting steps associated with the oxidation step. Work in this reporting period focused on testing of the kinetic mechanism reported in the previous semiannual report, and the interpretation of data (both ours and literature). This model yields good qualitative agreement with the data and indicates that mercury oxidation occurs during the thermal quench of the combustion gases. The model also suggests that atomic chlorine is the key oxidizing species. The oxidation is limited to a temperature window between 700-400 C that is defined by the overlap of (1) a region of significant superequilibrium Cl concentration, and (2) a region where oxidized mercury is favored by equilibrium. Above 700 C reverse reactions effectively limit oxidized mercury concentrations. Below 400 C, atomic chlorine concentrations are too low to support further oxidation. The implication of these results are that homogeneous oxidation is governed primarily by (1) HCl concentration, (2) quench rate, and (3) background gas composition. Work conducted under the present grant has been the subject of one journal paper that was accepted for publication during the reporting period (Sliger et al., 1999).
Date: August 6, 1999
Creator: Kramlich, John C.; Sliger, Rebecca N. & Going, David J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High Amplitude Secondary Mass Drive

Description: In this paper we describe a high amplitude electrostatic drive for surface micromachined mechanical oscillators that may be suitable for vibratory gyroscopes. It is an advanced design of a previously reported dual mass oscillator (Dyck, et. al., 1999). The structure is a 2 degree-of-freedom, parallel-plate driven motion amplifier, termed the secondary mass drive oscillator (SMD oscillator). During each cycle the device contacts the drive plates, generating large electrostatic forces. Peak-to-peak amplitudes of 54 {micro}m have been obtained by operating the structure in air with an applied voltage of 11 V. We describe the structure, present the analysis and design equations, and show recent results that have been obtained, including frequency response data, power dissipation, and out-of- plane motion.
Date: July 6, 2000
Creator: DYCK,CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM; ALLEN,JAMES J.; HUBER,ROBERT JOHN & SNIEGOWSKI,JEFFRY J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

REDUCTION OF INHERENT MERCURY EMISSIONS IN PC COMBUSTION

Description: Mercury emission compliance is one of the major potential challenges raised by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Simple ways of controlling emissions have not been identified. The variability in the field data suggests that inherent mercury emissions may be reduced if the source of this inherent capture can be identified and controlled. The key mechanisms appear to involve the oxidation of the mercury to Hg{sup 2}, generally producing the more reactive HgCl{sub 2} , followed by its capture by certain components of the fly ash or char. This research focuses on identifying the rate-limiting steps associated with the oxidation step. Work in this reporting period focused on the development and application of a kinetics model to the oxidation data developed in the present program and literature data under MSW conditions. The results indicate that the pathway Hg + Cl = HgCl followed by HgCl + HCl = HgCl{sub 2} + H predominates over Hg + Cl{sub 2} under high-temperature conditions. This primarily occurs because Cl{sub 2} concentrations are too low under the present conditions to contribute significantly.
Date: August 6, 1999
Creator: Kramlich, John C.; Sliger, Rebecca N. & Going, David J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Accelerated test methods for life prediction of hermetic motor insulation systems exposed to alternative refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. Phase 3: Reproducibility and discrimination testing. Final report

Description: In 1992, the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc. (ARTI) contracted Radian Corporation to ascertain whether an improved accelerated test method or procedure could be developed that would allow prediction of the life of motor insulation materials used in hermetic motors for air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment operated with alternative refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. This report presents the results of phase three concerning the reproducibility and discrimination testing.
Date: May 6, 1996
Creator: Ellis, P.F. II; Ferguson, A.F. & Fuentes, K.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Meteorological monitoring at the Savannah River Site in 1995

Description: The meteorological monitoring program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has traditionally provided weather information for a variety of needs such as input for calculating the transport and diffusion of an accidental release of an atmospheric contaminant or applications which require a longer term data base representative of the local climatology. These applications include dosimetric and air quality calculations, engineering analyses, environmental characterizations, and risk assessments. In today`s shrinking budgetary climate, new initiatives for the SRS meteorological monitoring program are developing. These new initiatives and an overview of the meteorological monitoring program at the SRS are presented.
Date: March 6, 1996
Creator: Parker, M.J. & Addis, R.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbon Sequestration in Forests

Description: This report examines basic questions concerning carbon sequestration in forests. The first section provides a brief background on congressional interest in forest carbon sequestration. The second describes the basic carbon cycle in forests, with an overview of how carbon cycling and storage vary among different types of forests. The third section then addresses how forest carbon is considered in the global climate change debate.
Date: August 6, 2009
Creator: Gorte, Ross W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department