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Hello out there. Are you reading me. [Audience identification]

Description: Audience identification is the first step in purposeful writing. Yet we find little written information that helps us in determining the makeup of an audience, what it needs to know, and how we can use that information to produce a meaningful publication. A large national laboratory reaches diverse audiences with different types of publications. Representative communicators who produce manuals, press releases, public relations publications, in-house publications, journal articles, and technical reports share their methods of identifying and writing for audiences and pose some thought-provoking questions about audiences and the lack thereof.
Date: January 1, 1982
Creator: Lindberg, H.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Los Alamos National Laboratory Associate Directorate for Physics and Life Sciences Quality Program

Description: This report discusses the following on Los Alamos National Laboratory: laboratory mission with physics and life sciences goals; physics and life sciences quality requirements and guidance documents basis; process flow-down of documentation; line-organization internal and external assessments; laboratory management issues under development; and the quality assurance management plan.
Date: March 1, 1993
Creator: Mignardot, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ensuring cost effectiveness in the TAP process

Description: The Training Accredition Program (TAP) at the Waste Isolation Division (WID) is discussed by the general manager. Cost effectiveness in the TAP process is made possible by saving through sharing which refers to the exchange and co-development of information and technology among Westinghouse Government owned-contractor operators and with other organizations. In 1990 a comprehensive management and supervisor training (MAST) program plan was devised and a MAST certification program of 31 self-paced written moduler was developed. This program has proven to be inexpensive to develop and implement when compared to classroom training. In addition, total quality is used as a tool to continuously improve work process. Continuous improvement requires continued evaluation of work process, such as TAP analysis and development in summary to make training at DOE facilities the most cost-effective training anywhere, we need to share, challenge conventional wisdom, and seek to continuously improve.
Date: June 16, 1992
Creator: Trego, A. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Re-engineering facilities management at Los Alamos: Managing the behavioral change

Description: The Los Alamos National Laboratory is a multi-program research and development laboratory operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy. The laboratory was founded in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project. The laboratory has major programs in nuclear weapons technology, non-nuclear defense, environmental preservation and restoration, health and biotechnology, and other areas of national importance. Today the laboratory`s vision is to be a world class laboratory solving complex problems of national importance where science makes a difference. The laboratory will continue its special role in defense, particularly in nuclear weapons technology, and will increasingly use its multi-disciplinary capabilities to solve problems in the civilian sector. Recognizing the changing environment, major strides are being made in collaborations with US industry. Over 70 Cooperative R&D Agreements (CRADA`s) are in progress and more than 15 separate spin-off companies have been created. The nuclear weapons program is responding to new priorities with increased emphasis on weapons dismantlement, control of proliferation, emphasis on development of technologies that can have dual use (both defense and commercial) as well as continuing stewardship of the existing stockpile. The laboratory has a strong tradition of ownership of its products from ``cradle to grave,`` and this tradition bodes well for the future as it becomes more externally market driven.
Date: October 1, 1994
Creator: Crider, S. A. & van der Hoeven, B. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Department of Energy standards index. Revision 1

Description: This document was prepared for personnel involved in selection and use of DOE technical standards and other standardization documents. The document provides listings of DOE technical standards, non-Government standards adopted by DOE, other Government documents in which DOE has a recorded interest, and DOE site standards. Cancelled DOE technical standards are also listed.
Date: September 1, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The audit checklist: Your key to audit success

Description: As the old saying goes, ``If you have no objective, any road will take your there.`` So it is with the audit checklist. The checklist is the primary tool for providing order to Quality Assurance audit activities. With a well-planned and well-defined checklist, success is achievable. Without a checklist, the auditor has a disjointed, disorganized activity and no place to document his or her failed efforts. A number of formal quality programs which include audits as one of their program elements require the audit to be performed using a checklist or procedures to document what the auditor reviewed and what he or she found. It is the intent of this paper to provide the reader with the some insight as to the value of the checklist; the varieties of checklists that can be constructed; the pitfalls of improper application; and the success that can be achieved when the checklist has been properly researched, developed, and deployed.
Date: February 1, 1992
Creator: Maday, J. H. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recommendations for improvements to program and project management

Description: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has operated with a balanced matrix organization for over sixteen years. Much of the work at the Laboratory is accomplished with good customer satisfaction through programs, projects, and matrix management. During the past several years concerns about program and project management at ORNL have been expressed by both the Department of Energy and ORNL staff. In May 1993 the ORNL Division/Program/Office Directors Caucus chartered a ``fox team`` to identity and to recommend improvements to matrix management that would lead to resolution of these concerns. Nine experienced ORNL staff members served on this Matrix Management Upgrade Solutions Team (MMUST). The MMUST adopted a four-phase approach in which they first gathered information and then developed and proposed recommended actions. In the fourth phase the team was available to support implementation of the recommendations. They began work in June 1993, gathering and evaluating information in biweekly meetings for six months. Recommendations developed in October and November 1993 were presented to ORNL management in December. The MMUST issued three principal recommendations based on their evaluation of the information gathered. They are: Renew and enhance the ORNL management commitment to matrix management, program managers, and project managers; Implement actions to ensure career path parity between the program/project manager family of positions and the technical line manager family of positions across all directorates and divisions; and Clarify and document program/project manager roles, responsibilities, and authorities.
Date: January 1, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Equal employment opportunity plan development guidance

Description: The purpose of this publication is to provide instructions for the development of EEO Plans for Fiscal Year 1979. It supplements the National EEO Plan for the Department of Energy issued in August 1978 (DOE/S-0002). The material included should be used immediately as guidance to develop, document, and implement subordinate echelon commitments to EEO. A schedule for the development and submission of EEO Plans is included. Most of the continuing requirements will be published at a later date as part of the directives system. Any comments or helpful suggestions concerned with the program outlined would be appreciated by the Office of Equal Opportunity.
Date: September 1, 1978
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrating quality assurance and research and development

Description: Quality assurance programs cannot be transferred from one organization to another without attention to existing cultures and traditions. Introduction of quality assurance programs constitutes a significant change and represents a significant impact on the organizational structure and operational mode. Quality assurance professionals are change agents, but do not know how to be effective ones. Quality assurance as a body of knowledge and experience can only become accepted when its practitioners become familiar with their role as change agents. 8 references.
Date: February 15, 1985
Creator: Dronkers, J.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The audit checklist: Your key to audit success

Description: As the old saying goes, If you have no objective, any road will take your there.'' So it is with the audit checklist. The checklist is the primary tool for providing order to Quality Assurance audit activities. With a well-planned and well-defined checklist, success is achievable. Without a checklist, the auditor has a disjointed, disorganized activity and no place to document his or her failed efforts. A number of formal quality programs which include audits as one of their program elements require the audit to be performed using a checklist or procedures to document what the auditor reviewed and what he or she found. It is the intent of this paper to provide the reader with the some insight as to the value of the checklist; the varieties of checklists that can be constructed; the pitfalls of improper application; and the success that can be achieved when the checklist has been properly researched, developed, and deployed.
Date: February 1, 1992
Creator: Maday, J.H. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Learner characteristics involved in distance learning

Description: Distance learning represents a strategy for leveraging resources to solve educational and training needs. Although many distance learning programs have been developed, lessons learned regarding differences between distance learning and traditional education with respect to learner characteristics have not been well documented. Therefore, we conducted a survey of 20 distance learning professionals. The questionnaire was distributed to experts attending the second Distance Learning Conference sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This survey not only acquired demographic information from each of the respondents but also identified important distance learning student characteristics. Significant distance learner characteristics, which were revealed statistically and which influence the effectiveness of distance learning, include the following: reading level, student autonomy, and self-motivation. Distance learning cannot become a more useful and effective method of instruction without identifying and recognizing learner characteristics. It will be important to consider these characteristics when designing all distance learning courses. This paper will report specific survey findings and their implications for developing distance learning courses. 9 refs., 6 tabs.
Date: January 1, 1991
Creator: Cernicek, A.T. & Hahn, H.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance relationship diagrams

Description: By describing a business function's cost drivers and graphically depicting the interrelated cost drivers serving as controls and resources to them, a visual performance model can be provided. A graphical technique, called performance relationship diagraming, has been devised that logically describes these cost drivers and their interrelationships. 2 figs.
Date: November 1, 1991
Creator: Cary, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Writing audit findings: Be reasonable!

Description: A customary approach to auditing and reporting deficiencies is to keep a running list of those that are found, evaluate the severity of each, and based on the evidence, document findings or observations or concerns in an audit report. The report is issued and the auditee is normally requested to address ``root cause`` as part of their corrective action. This paper describes a ``root problems`` approach to documenting audit findings that is designed not only to put the QA auditor in a more favorable light, but to more effectively enable the auditee to identify root cause and meaningful corrective action. The positive results of this approach are considerable. You will have fewer findings but those you do have will be substantial. You will cite requirements that sound reasonable and make arguments difficult. If some of the supporting deficiencies (examples) prove to be incorrect, you will still have ample support for the original finding. You will be seen as reasonable individual who can help lead the auditee towards identification of root cause without taking away part of the responsibility. You even have a fair chance of fostering a sense of commitment to quality improvement on the auditee`s part. This in itself, is its own reward.
Date: May 1, 1992
Creator: Girvin, N. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Providing quality customer services in a research and development project management organization

Description: Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is one of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) largest multiprogram laboratories and is managed by Martin Marietta Corporation. The Defense Programs Division is a 700-person organization that manages weapons-related R&D projects. A Management Services (MS) organization was established for the division in April 1992. This organization`s primary functions are to serve as the Vice President`s Deputy for Operations and to assist managers and staff with services such as corporate-required training, environmental safety and health (ES&H) functions, space planning, and to challenge administrative barriers and non-programmatic requirements. MS relies totally on customer funding. The customers` bottom line for measuring MS performance is the number of hours saved. Quarterly customer satisfaction surveys are conducted. Customers rate the quality of services provided, review the hours saved, and identify services that can be improved. This paper discusses a total quality management approach for managing customer relationships and shares lessons learned.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Yarnall, C. A. & Page, L. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interview or inquisition: Successful communication techniques (Or what does ethics have to do with it, anyway?)

Description: Auditing and being audited can be a very stressful event. The auditor has to be sensitive to the anxiety of all auditees and should do everything possible to put the auditee at ease and help the audit process to proceed smoothly. In this paper, the human factors associated with auditing are discussed and methods of communication and other interfacing techniques are discussed which, hopefully, can act as stress reducers. The ``bottom-line`` of any audit should be to provide feedback to the auditees that will help validate or improve their process and management system. Reducing the stress and enhancing communication will help to better achieve this goal. Although some evidence during an audit is gathered from records and documents, a significant portion of audit time is spent interviewing the audited organization`s personnel. Therefore, much of this paper deals with interview techniques. It is up to the auditor to establish an initial atmosphere of trust and open communication. The goal is to obtain as much valid information as possible in the shortest time possible. Auditors should emphasize that they are there to audit the systems or program, not the person. Auditors should help the auditees` line management view the audit not as a ``search for the guilty,`` but an audit that will identify problems and assist in correction of existing or potential system problems. It should be the clearly defined policy of any audit program that there be no surprises involved with the evaluation. An ethical audit is not the place for cloak-and-dagger tactics, for witch hunting, or for the identification of situations that are then sprung at a critical and embarrassing time (a ``gotcha``).
Date: February 1, 1993
Creator: Pratt, R. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Directory of awardee names

Description: Standardization of grant and contract awardee names has been an area of concern since the development of the Department`s Procurement and Assistance Data System (PADS). A joint effort was begun in 1983 by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and the Office of Procurement and Assistance Management/Information Systems and Analysis Division to develop a means for providing uniformity of awardee names. As a result of this effort, a method of assigning vendor identification codes to each unique awardee name, division, city, and state combination was developed and is maintained by OSTI. Changes to vendor identification codes or awardee names contained in PADS can be made only by OSTI. Awardee names in the Directory indicate that the awardee has had a prime contract (excluding purchase orders of $10,000 or less) with, or a financial assistance award from, the Department. Award status--active, inactive, or retired--is not shown. The Directory is in alphabetic sequence based on awardee name and reflects the OSTI-assigned vendor identification code to the right of the name. A vendor identification code is assigned to each unique awardee name, division, city, and state (for place of performance). The same vendor identification code is used for awards throughout the Department.
Date: July 1, 1999
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The pre-audit assessment: A homework assignment for auditors

Description: The role of the quality assurance audit is evolving from compliance verification to a much broader assessment of programmatic and management performance. In the past, audits were poorly understood and caused fear and trepidation. Auditees turned an audit into a cat-and-mouse game using coverup strategies and decoy discrepancies. These games were meant to ``give the auditors what they want, namely a few findings that could later be easily corrected. At Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), I observed auditing become a spectator sport. Matching a compliance-oriented auditor against a crafty group of scientists provided hours of entertainment. As a program manager, it was clear these games were neither productive useful nor cost effective. Fortunately, over the past few years several concepts embraced by ``total quality management` have begun to emerge at PNL. These concepts are being adopted by most successful organizations, and based on these concepts new tools and ideas are emerging to help organizations improve productivity and quality. Successful organizations have been and are continuing to develop management strategies that rely on participative approaches to their operations. These approaches encourage the empowerment of organization staff at all levels, with the goal of instilling ownership of quality in every staff member. As management philosophies are changing, so are the responsibilities and expectations of managers. Managers everywhere are experimenting with new tools to help them improve their operations and competitiveness. As the quality audit evolves, managers and other customers of the audit process have developed expectations for the auditing process that never existed in years past. These expectations have added complexity to the audit process. It is no longer adequate to prepare a checklist, perform the audit, and document the results. When viewed as a tool for verifying performance, a quality audit becomes more than a compliance checklist.
Date: February 1, 1993
Creator: Marschman, S. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Maintenance and operations contractor plan for transition to the project Hanford management contract (PHMC)

Description: This plan has been developed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), and its subcontractors ICF Kaiser Hanford (ICF KH) and BCS Richland, Inc. (BCSR), at the direction of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL). WHC and its subcontractors are hereafter referred to as the Maintenance and Operations (M and O) Contractor. The plan identifies actions involving the M and O Contractor that are critical to (1) prepare for a smooth transition to the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC), and (2) support and assist the PHMC and RL in achieving transition as planned, with no or minimal impact to ongoing baseline activities. The plan is structured around two primary phases. The first is the pre-award phase, which started in mid-February 1996 and is currently scheduled to be completed on June 1, 1996, at which time the contract is currently planned to be awarded. The second is the follow-on four-month post-award phase from June 1, 1996, until October 1, 1996. Considering the magnitude and complexity of the scope of work being transitioned, completion in four months will require significant effort by all parties. To better ensure success, the M and O Contractor has developed a pre-award phase that is intended to maximize readiness for transition. Priority is given to preparation for facility assessments and processing of personnel, as these areas are determined to be on the critical path for transition. In addition, the M and O Contractor will put emphasis during the pre-award phase to close out open items prior to contract award, to include grievances, employee concerns, audit findings, compliance issues, etc.
Date: April 12, 1996
Creator: Waite, J. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Listing of awardee names: Active awards

Description: This catalog/directory presents DOE`s procurement and assistance data system, arranged according to awardee name, bin, completion date, description of work, division, vendor ID, city, state, congressional district, contract value, obligations to date, P/S.
Date: July 1, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Standard for developing and issuing DOE safety guides and implementation guides

Description: This standard establishes the style, format, content, and process for preparing and issuing DOE guides. It is intended for use by all DOE components, including contractors. The DOE guides provide information on DOE`s expectations on meeting the provisions of rules, orders, notices, manuals, immediate action directives, and regulatory standards (requirements documents) or policies.
Date: July 1, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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