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Proof-of-concept development of PXAMS (projectile x-ray accelerator mass spectrometry)

Description: Prior to the current work, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was limited to a set of {approximately}8--10 isotopes. This limitation is caused primarily by the inability to discriminate against stable atomic isobars. An analysis scheme that combines the isotopic sensitivity of AMS with similar isobar selectivity would open a large new class of isotope applications. This project was undertaken to explore the use of characteristic x rays as a method for the detection and identification of ions,and to allow the post-spectrometer rejection of isobaric interferences for isotopes previously inaccessible to AMS. During the second half of FY94 (with Advanced Concepts funding from the Office of Non-Proliferation and National Security), we examined the feasability of this technique, which we are referring to as PXAMS (Projectile X ray AMS), to the detection of several isotopes at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In our first exploratory work, we measured the x ray yield vs energy for {sup 80}Se ions stopped in a thick Y target. These results, demonstrated that useful detection efficiencies could be obtained for Se ions at energies accessible with our accelerator, and that the count rate from target x rays is small compared to the Se K{alpha} rate. We followed these measurements with a survey of x ray yields for Z = 14-46.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Proctor, I.D.; Roberts, M.L.; McAninch, J.E. & Bench, G.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Understanding and controlling melt crlystallization of glassy phosphate polymers

Description: Crystallization rates of GPP (glassy phosphate polymer) were increased by the am shear deformation/mixing. Evolution of structure during shear flow of the GPP melt can be explained by re-ordering of polyphosphate molecular chains or liquid crystalline structures in the melt state. Semi-quantitative melt processing parameters such as onset time for crystallization, shear strain, and rate can be used to control the GPP crystallization. The analytical techniques used (DSC/XRD, etc.) in this study are novel and efficient in characterizing effects of crystallization during flow of phosphate glass melts in a rheometer, extruder, etc.
Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: Otaigbe, , I.U.; Sales, B.C. & Beall, G.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simulations of laser-initiated stress waves

Description: We present a study of the short-time scale (< 250 ns) fluid dynamic response of water to a fiber-delivered laser pulse of variable energy and spatial profile. The laser pulse was deposited on a stress confinement time scale. The spatial profile was determined by the fiber core radius r (110 and 500 microns) and the water absorption coefficient {mu}{sub 2} (200 and 50 l/cm). Considering 2D cylindrical symmetry, the combination of fiber radius and absorption coefficient parameters can be characterized as near planar (1{mu}{sub 2} greater than r), symmetric (1/{mu}{sub 2}=r), and side-directed (1/{mu}{sub 2} less than r). The spatial profile study shows how the stress wave various as a function of geometry. For example, relatively small absorption coefficients can result in side-propagating shear and tensile fields.
Date: March 7, 1997
Creator: Maitland, D.J.; Celliers, P.; Amendt, P.; Da Silva, L.; London, R.A.; Matthews, D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Particle separations by electrophoretic techniques

Description: A new method for particle separations based on capillary electrophoresis has been developed and characterized. It uniquely separates particles according to their chemical nature. Separations have been demonstrated with chemically modified latex particles and with inorganic oxide and silicate particles. Separations have been shown both experimentally and theoretically to be essentially independent of particle size in the range of about 0.2 {mu}m to 10 {mu}m. The method has been applied to separations of U0{sub 2} particles from environmental particulate material. For this, an integrated method was developed for capillary electrophoretic separation, collection of separated fractions, and determinations of U0{sub 2} and environmental particles in each fraction. Experimental runs with the integrated method on mixtures of UO{sub 2} particles and environmental particulate material demonstrated enrichment factors of 20 for UO{sub 2} particles in respect to environmental particles in the U0{sub 2}containing fractions. This enrichment factor reduces the costs and time for processing particulate samples by the lexan process by a factor of about 20.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Ballou, N.E.; Petersen, S.L.; Ducatte, G.R. & Remcho, V.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technetium-99 and strontium-90: Abundance determination at ultratrace sensitivity by AMS as signatures of undeclared nuclear reprocessing activity

Description: The purpose of this White Paper is to examine the use of the ultratrace technique Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) to lower detection limits for {sup 99}Tc and {sup 90}Sr, and to examine the utility of these isotopes as signatures of a convert reprocessing facility. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has committed to improving the effectiveness of the IAEA Safeguards System. This is in some degree a result of the discovery in 1991 of an undeclared Iraqi EMIS program. Recommendations from the March 1993 Consultants Group Meeting have resulted in several studies and follow on field trials to identify environmental signatures from covert nuclear fuel reprocessing activity. In particular, the April, 1993 reports of the Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation (SAGSI) identified the long-lived radioisotopes Technetium-99 and strontium-90 as two reliable signatures of fuel reprocessing activity. This report also suggested pathways in the chemical processing of irradiated fuel where these elements would be volatilized and potentially released in amounts detectable with ultratrace sensitivity techniques. Based on measured {sup 99}Tc background levels compiled from a variety of sources, it is estimated that AMS can provide 10% measurements of environmental levels of {sup 99}Tc in a few minutes using modestly sized samples: a few grams for soils, plants, or animal tissues; one to several liters for rain or seawater samples; and tens to hundreds of cubic meters for air sampling. Small sample sizes and high sample throughput result in significant increases in feasibility, cost effectiveness, and quality of data for a regional monitoring program. Similar results are expected for {sup 90}Sr.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: McAninch, J.E. & Proctor, I.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A phenomenological finite element model of stereolithography processing

Description: In the stereolithography process, three dimensional parts are built layer by layer using a laser to selectively cure slices of a photocurable resin, one on top of another. As the laser spot passes over the surface of the resin, the ensuing chemical reaction causes the resin to shrink and stiffen during solidification. When laser paths cross or when new layers are cured on top of existing layers, residual stresses are generated as the cure shrinkage of the freshly gelled resin is constrained by the adjoining previously-cured material. These internal stresses can cause curling in the compliant material. A capability for performing finite element analyses of the stereolithography process has been developed. Although no attempt has been made to incorporate all the physics of the process, a numerical platform suitable for such development has been established. A methodology and code architecture have been structured to allow finite elements to be birthed (activated) according to a prescribed order mimicking the procedure by which a laser is used to cure and build-up surface layers of resin to construct a three dimensional geometry. In its present form, the finite element code incorporates a simple phenomenological viscoelastic material model of solidification that is based on the shrinkage and relaxation observed following isolated, uncoupled laser exposures. The phenomenological material model has been used to analyze the curl in a simple cantilever beam and to make qualitative distinctions between two contrived build styles.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Chambers, R.S.; Guess, T.R. & Hinnerichs, T.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In-tank pretreatment of high-level tank wastes: The SIPS system

Description: A new approach, termed SIPS (Small In-Tank Processing System), that enables the in-tank processing and separation of high-level tank wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) streams that are suitable for vitrification, is described. Presently proposed pretreatment systems, such as enhanced sludge washing (ESW) and TRUEX, require that the high-level tank wastes be retrieved and pumped to a large, centralized processing facility, where the various waste components are separated into a relatively small, radioactively concentrated stream (HLW), and a relatively large, predominantly non-radioactive stream (LLW). In SIPS, a small process module, typically on the order of 1 meter in diameter and 4 meters in length, is inserted into a tank. During a period of approximately six months, it processes the solid/liquid materials in the tank, separating them into liquid HLW and liquid LLW output streams that are pumped away in two small diameter (typically 3 cm o.d.) pipes. The SIPS concept appears attractive for pretreating high level wastes, since it would: (1) process waste in-situ in the tanks, (2) be cheaper and more reliable than a larger centralized facility, (3) be quickly demonstrable at full scale, (4) have less technical risk, (5) avoid having to transfer unstable slurries for long distances, and (6) be simple to decommission and dispose of. Further investigation of the SIPS concept appears desirable, including experimental testing and development of subscale demonstration units.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Reich, M.; Powell, J. & Barletta, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of Phase II glass formulations for vitrification of Hanford Site low-level waste

Description: A vendor glass formulation study was carried out at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), supporting the Phase I and Phase II melter vendor testing activities for Westinghouse Hanford Company. This study is built upon the LLW glass optimization effort that will be described in a separate report. For Phase I vendor melter testing, six glass formulations were developed at PNL and additional were developed by Phase I vendors. All the doses were characterized in terms of viscosity and chemical durability by the 7-day Product Consistency Test. Twelve Phase II glass formulations (see Tables 3.5 and 3.6) were developed to accommodate 2.5 wt% P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and 1.0 wt% S0{sub 3} without significant processing problems. These levels of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and SO{sub 3} are expected to be the highest possible concentrations from Hanford Site LLW streams at 25 wt% waste loading in glass. The Phase H compositions formulated were 6 to 23 times more durable than the environmental assessment (EA) glass. They melt within the temperature range of 1160{degrees} to 1410{degrees}C to suit different melting technologies. The composition types include boron-free for volatilization sensitive melters; boron-containing glasses for coId-cap melters; Zr-containing, glasses for enhanced Iong-term durability; and Fe-containing glasses for reducing melting temperature and melt volatility while maintaining chemical durability.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Feng, X.; Hrma, P.R. & Schweiger, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sampling and Analysis Plan for PUREX canyon vessel flushing

Description: A sampling and analysis plan is necessary to provide direction for the sampling and analytical activities determined by the data quality objectives. This document defines the sampling and analysis necessary to support the deactivation of the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) facility vessels that are regulated pursuant to Washington Administrative Code 173-303.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Villalobos, C.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a field-portable air monitor for Lewisite

Description: The focus of this research is the development of a prototype field-portable ambient-air monitor for measuring trace levels of volatile organoarsenicals. Lewisite (dichloro[2-chlorovinyl]arsine) is a chemical warfare agent developed during World War I and stockpiled on a large scale by the former Soviet Union. A continuous air monitor for Lewisite at the eight-hour time-weighted-average concentration (3 {mu}g/m{sup 3}) is necessary to protect the safety and health of arms control treaty inspectors. Flow injection is used to integrate an air sampling device based on liquid-phase extraction with a flow-through detector based on potentiometric stripping analysis. We describe a method for the sampling and preconcentration of organoarsenicals from ambient air by using a gas permeation membrane sampler. The sampler is designed to selectively preconcentrate analyte that permeates a silicone rubber membrane into a caustic carrier stream. Instrument design is described for the sampling and detection methodologies.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Aldstadt, J.H.; Martin, A.F. & Olson, D.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proton and hydride transfers in solution: hybrid QMmm/MM free energy perturbation study

Description: A hybrid quantum and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy perturbation (FEP) method is implemented in the context of molecular dynamics (MD). The semiempirical quantum mechanical (QM) Hamiltonian (Austin Model 1) represents solute molecules, and the molecular mechanical (MM) CHARMM force field describes the water solvent. The QM/MM FEP method is used to calculate the free energy changes in aqueous solution for (1) a proton transfer from methanol to imidazole and (2) a hydride transfer from methoxide to nicotinamide. The QM/MM interaction energies between the solute and solvent arc calibrated to emulate the solute-solvent interaction energies determined at the Hartee-Fock 6-31G(d) level of ab initio theory. The free energy changes for the proton and hydride transfers are calculated to be 15.1 and {minus}6.3 kcal/mol, respectively, which compare favorably with the corresponding experimental values of 12.9 and {minus}7.4 kcal/mol. An estimate of the reliability of the calculations is obtained through the computation of the forward (15.1 and {minus}6.3 kcal/mol) and backward ({minus}14.1 and 9.1 kcal/mol)free energy changes. The reasonable correspondence between these two independent calculations suggests that adequate phase space sampling is obtained along the reaction pathways chosen to transform the proton and hydride systems between their respective reactant and product states.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Ho, L. Lawrence; Bash, P.A. & Kerell, A.D., Jr
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and evaluation of on-line detection techniques for polar organics in ultrapure water

Description: An on-line monitor that can perform rapid, trace detection of polar organics such as acetone and isopropanol in ultrapure water (UPW) is necessary to efficiently recycle water in semiconductor manufacturing facilities. The detection of these analytes is problematic due to their high solubility in water, resulting in low partitioning into sensor coatings for direct water analysis or into the vapor phase for detection by vapor phase analyzers. After considering various options, we have evaluated two conventional laboratory techniques: gas chromatography and ion mobility spectroscopy. In addition, optimizations of sensor coating materials and sample preconditioning systems were performed with the goal of a low cost, chemical sensor system for this application. Results from these evaluations, including recommendations for meeting the needs of this application, are reported.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Frye, G.C.; Blair, D.S.; Schneider, T.W.; Mowry, C.D.; Colburn, C.W. & Donovan, R.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Photocatalytic oxidation of gas-phase BTEX-contaminated waste streams

Description: Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have been exploring heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) as a remediation technology for air streams contaminated with benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylenes (BTEX). This research is a continuation of work performed on chlorinated organics. The photocatalytic oxidation of BTEX has been studied in the aqueous phase, however, a study by Turchi et al. showed a more economical system would involve stripping organic contaminants from the aqueous phase and treating the resulting gas stream. Another recent study by Turchi et al. indicated that PCO is cost competitive with such remediation technologies as activated carbon adsorption and catalytic incineration for some types of contaminated air streams. In this work we have examined the photocatalytic oxidation of benzene using ozone (0{sub 3}) as an additional oxidant. We varied the residence time in the PCO reactor, the initial concentration of the organic pollutant, and the initial ozone concentration in a single-pass reactor. Because aromatic hydrocarbons represent only a small fraction of the total hydrocarbons present in gasoline and other fuels, we also added octane to the reaction mixture to simulate the composition of air streams produced from soil-vapor-extraction or groundwater-stripping of sites contaminated with gasoline.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Gratson, D A; Nimlos, M R & Wolfrum, E J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conversion of holes into reducing species on surface modified small-particle TiO{sub 2}

Description: Complexation of colloidal titanium dioxide nanoparticles (40 {angstrom}) by cysteine as a surface derivative was investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and infra-red (diffusion reflectance infra-red Fourier Transform DRIFT) spectroscopies. It was found that cysteine strongly binds to the colloid surface. The authors have demonstrated with EPR spectroscopy that cysteine modifies the TiO{sub 2} surface with formation of new trapping sites where photogenerated electrons and holes are localized. Illumination of cysteine modified TiO{sub 2} at 77K resulted in formation of a sulfur centered radical observed by EPR spectroscopy at 200 K. Upon addition of lead ions, a new complex of cysteine that bridges surface titanium atoms and lead ions was detected by IR spectroscopy. Illumination of lead/cysteine modified TiO{sub 2} did not result in the formation of sulfur centered radical, but symmetrical, lattice defect type EPR signal for trapped holes was observed. However, addition of methanol to this system resulted in the formation of {center_dot}CH{sub 2}OH radical following illumination at 8.2 K. After the temperature was raised to 120 K, doubling of the signal associated with electrons trapped at particle surface (Ti(3){sub surf}) was observed. On further increase of the temperature to 200 K the EPR signal for trapped electrons disappeared as a result of the reduction of Pb{sup 2+} ions, and metallic lead was observed to precipitate. Conversion of photogenerated holes into trapped electrons due to the presence of methanol doubles the yield of trapped electrons that can reduce Pb{sup 2+}. Direct reduction of Pb{sup 2+} ions by {center_dot}CH{sub 2}OH radical on TiO{sub 2} was not detected.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Micic, O.I.; Ostafin, A.E.; Rajh, T.; Sabelko, J.J.; Thurnauer, M.C.; Tiede, D.M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Biological and chemical technologies research. FY 1995 annual summary report

Description: The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1995 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program. This BCTR program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1995 (ASR 95) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1995; detailed descriptions of individual projects; a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work; patents; and awards arising from work supported by the BCTR.
Date: March 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Optical properties of fluids in microfabricated channels

Description: Microfabricated channels are widely thought to be the key to realizing chemical analysis on a microscopic scale. Chemical and biological information in the microchannels is often probed with optical techniques such as fluorescence, Raman and absorption spectroscopy. However, the optical effects of a microchannel are not well characterized. For example, it is important to understand the optics of the channel in order to optimize optical coupling efficiency. The authors consider various designs for enhancing the sensitivity of fluorescence detection in a microchannel.
Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: French, T.; Gourley, P.L. & McDonald, A.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transient Heat Transfer in TCAP Coils

Description: The Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) is used to separate isotopes of hydrogen. TCAP involves passing a stream of mixed hydrogen isotopes through palladium deposited on kieselguhr (Pd/k) while cycling the temperature of the Pd/k. Kieselguhr is a silica mineral also called diatomite. To aid in the design of a full scale facility, the Thermal Fluids Laboratory was used by the Chemical and Hydrogen Technology Section to compare the heat transfer properties of three different configurations of stainless steel coils containing kieselguhr and helium. Testing of coils containing Pd/k and hydrogen isotopes would have been more prototypical but would have been too expensive. Three stainless steel coils filled with kieselguhr were tested; one made from 2.0 inch diameter tubing, one made from 2.0 inch diameter tubing with foam copper embedded in the kieselguhr and one made from 1.25 inch diameter tubing. It was known prior to testing that increasing the tubing diameter from 1.25 inch to 2.0 inch would slow the rate of temperature change. The primary purpose of the testing was to measure to what extent the presence of copper foam in a 2.0" tubing coil would compensate for the effect of larger diameter. Each coil was connected to a pressure gage and the coil was evacuated and backfilled with helium gas. Helium was used instead of a mixture of hydrogen isotopes for reasons of safety. Each coil was quickly immersed in a stirred bath of ethylene glycol at a temperature of approximately 100 degrees Celsius. The coil pressure increased, reflecting the increase in average temperature of its contents. The pressure transient was recored as a function of time after immersion. Because of the actual process will use Pd/k instead of kieselguhr, additional tests were run to determine the differences in thermal properties between the two materials. The method ...
Date: March 9, 1999
Creator: Steimke, J.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Metal-metal multiply bonded complexes of technetium. Final report

Description: The primary objective of this project was to explore and develop the area of technetium metal-metal multiple bond chemistry. At the outset of the project, examples of metal-metal multiply bonded complexes of technetium were primarily limited to those supported by halide and carboxylate ligands. As a result, we intended to significantly expand the number of complexes containing Tc-Tc multiple bonds using ligands other than carboxylates or halides. In order to achieve this goal, the results obtained from years of dirhenium research was used as a guide for the development of new technetium compounds. Our emphasis, however, was on pursuing unanticipated results and exploiting the inherent differences between technetium and rhenium in order to develop chemistry beyond that which exists for rhenium. We have focused our attention on the preparation of dinuclear complexes with ligand sets that are known to support dinuclear metal-metal bonded cores in a variety of different metal oxidation states. Investigation of the consequences of electron addition and removal from metal-metal bonding manifold on the structural and physical properties of such dinuclear species will provide vital information regarding the electronic structure of Tc-Tc multiply bonded compounds.
Date: March 30, 1995
Creator: Cotton, F. A. & Haefner, S. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spray combustion modeling. Final report

Description: Concern over the future availability of high quality liquid fuels or use in furnaces and boilers prompted the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to consider alternate fuels as replacements for the high grade liquid fuels used in the 1970`s and 1980`s. Alternate fuels were defined to be combinations of a large percentage of viscous, low volatility fuels resulting from the low end of distillation mixed with a small percentage of relatively low viscosity, high volatility fuels yielded by the high end of distillation. The addition of high volatility fuels was meant to promote desirable characteristics to a fuel that would otherwise be difficult to atomize and burn and whose combustion would yield a high amount of pollutants. Several questions thus needed to be answered before alternate fuels became commercially viable. These questions were related to fuel atomization, evaporation, ignition, combustion and pollutant formation. This final report describes the results of the most significant studies on ignition and combustion of alternative fuels.
Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: Bellan, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report on the evaluation of the tritium producing burnable absorber rod lead test assembly. Revision 1

Description: This report describes the design and fabrication requirements for a tritium-producing burnable absorber rod lead test assembly and evaluates the safety issues associated with tritium-producing burnable absorber rod irradiation on the operation of a commercial light water reactor. The report provides an evaluation of the tritium-producing burnable absorber rod design and concludes that irradiation can be performed within U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations applicable to a commercial pressurized light water reactor.
Date: March 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hydrothermal oxidation of Navy shipboard excess hazardous materials

Description: This study demonstrated effective destruction, using a novel supercritical water oxidation reactor, of oil, jet fuel, and hydraulic fluid, common excess hazardous materials found on-board Navy vessels. This reactor uses an advanced injector design to mix the hazardous compounds with water, oxidizer, and a supplementary fuel and it uses a transpiring wall to protect the surface of the reactor from corrosion and salt deposition. Our program was divided into four parts. First, basic chemical kinetic data were generated in a simple, tubular-configured reactor for short reaction times (<1 second) and long reaction times (>5 seconds) as a function of temperature. Second, using the data, an engineering model was developed for the more complicated industrial reactor mentioned above. Third, the three hazardous materials were destroyed in a quarter-scale version of the industrial reactor. Finally, the test data were compared with the model. The model and the experimental results for the quarter-scale reactor are described and compared in this report. A companion report discusses the first part of the program to generate basic chemical kinetic data. The injector and reactor worked as expected. The oxidation reaction with the supplementary fuel was initiated between 400 {degrees}C and 450 {degrees}C. The released energy raised the reactor temperature to greater than 600 {degrees}C. At that temperature, the hazardous materials were efficiently destroyed in less than five seconds. The model shows good agreement with the test data and has proven to be a useful tool in designing the system and understanding the test results. 16 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.
Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: LaJeunesse, C.A.; Haroldsen, B.L.; Rice, S.F. & Brown, B.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

General Chemistry Technical Note No. 71: Hydrogen compounds of low atomic weight

Description: This report provides a compilation of Hydrogen compounds of low atomic weight. Compounds known and reported in literature are given. Cations and anions of high Hydrogen content and/or low Z are provided as are molecules which form Lewis salts. Finally, unknown compounds for which synthesis seems probable are given.
Date: March 30, 1962
Creator: Pearson, R. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The development of a chemical kinetic measurement apparatus and the determination of the reaction rate constants for lithium-lead/steam interaction. Final report 9-21-90--3-31-95

Description: The objective of this research to experimentally determine the hydrogen generation rate during the beginning and subsequent stages of liquid metal (Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83}) and water reaction. The experimental set-up has been built. It includes a metal sample preparation apparatus, a reaction system, a measurement system and a PC based data acquisition and control system. The most important feature of the reaction system is a pneumatic actuated quick opening and closing high temperature, all stainless steel valve used the system for reaction time control. The PC system provides remote process sequencing, acquisition and control of all the systems except the metal preparation apparatus. Due to the reactivity of the lithium, all the metal sampling, preparation and loading procedures are executed in a glove box under argon protection. The metal temperature was varied between 350{degrees}C-650{degrees}C and water temperature fixed at 60{degrees}C during the experiments. A set of experimental procedures and two analyses methods: (1) thermodynamics method and (2) heat transfer method are discussed. All the measurements and data collections are executed under the PC system control. A data analysis program is used to calculate both the partial pressure of hydrogen and the hydrogen generation rate. The experiment results indicate that the amount of hydrogen generated is relate to the initial liquid metal temperature when the reaction surface is fixed. The mass of hydrogen generated as a function of initial liquid metal temperature and time of reaction is presented, The hydrogen generation over a time period of 240 seconds and the calculated errors are summarized in Table 1.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Biney, P.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Anion solvation in alcohols

Description: Anion solvation is measured in alcohols using pump-probe pulse radiolysis and the activation energy of solvation is determined. Solvation of an anion appears to be different than excited state solvation. The continuum dielectric model does not appear to explain the results.
Date: March 1996
Creator: Jonah, C. D.; Xujia, Zhang & Lin, Yi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department