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Synergistic Failure of BWR Internals

Description: Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) core shrouds and other reactor internals important to safety are experiencing intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has followed the problem, and as part of its investigations, contracted with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to conduct a risk assessment. The overall project objective is to assess the potential consequences and risks associated with the failure of IGSCC-susceptible BWR vessel internals, with specific consideration given to potential cascading and common mode effects. An initial phase has been completed in which background material was gathered and evaluated, and potential accident sequences were identified. A second phase is underway to perform a simplified, quantitative probabilistic risk assessment on a representative high-power BWR/4. Results of the initial study conducted on the jet pumps show that any cascading failures would not result in a significant increase in the core damage frequency. The methodology is currently being extended to other major reactor internals components.
Date: October 1, 1999
Creator: Ware, Arthur Gates & Chang, T-Y
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

REGIONAL BINNING FOR CONTINUED STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AND HIGH-LEVEL WASTES

Description: In the Continued Storage Analysis Report (CSAR) (Reference 1), DOE decided to analyze the environmental consequences of continuing to store the commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at 72 commercial nuclear power sites and DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste at five Department of Energy sites by region rather than by individual site. This analysis assumes that three commercial facilities pairs--Salem and Hope Creek, Fitzpatrick and Nine-Mile Point, and Dresden and Moms--share common storage due to their proximity to each other. The five regions selected for this analysis are shown on Figure 1. Regions 1, 2, and 3 are the same as those used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in their regulatory oversight of commercial power reactors. NRC Region 4 was subdivided into two regions to more appropriately define the two different climates that exist in NRC Region 4. A single hypothetical site in each region was assumed to store all the SNF and HLW in that region. Such a site does not exist and has no geographic location but is a mathematical construct for analytical purposes. To ensure that the calculated results for the regional analyses reflect appropriate inventory, facility and material degradation, and radionuclide transport, the waste inventories, engineered barriers, and environmental conditions for the hypothetical sites were developed from data for each of the existing sites within the given region. Weighting criteria to account for the amount and types of SNF and HLW at each site were used in the development of the environmental data for the regional site, such that the results of the analyses for the hypothetical site were representative of the sum of the results of each actual site if they had been modeled independently. This report defines the actual site data used in development of this hypothetical site, shows how the individual site ...
Date: October 1, 1998
Creator: W. Lee Poe, Jr
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Volumes, Masses, and Surface Areas for Shippingport LWBR Spent Nuclear Fuel in a DOE SNF Canister

Description: The purpose of this calculation is to estimate volumes, masses, and surface areas associated with (a) an empty Department of Energy (DOE) 18-inch diameter, 15-ft long spent nuclear fuel (SNF) canister, (b) an empty DOE 24-inch diameter, 15-ft long SNF canister, (c) Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) SNF, and (d) the internal basket structure for the 18-in. canister that has been designed specifically to accommodate Seed fuel from the Shippingport LWBR. Estimates of volumes, masses, and surface areas are needed as input to structural, thermal, geochemical, nuclear criticality, and radiation shielding calculations to ensure the viability of the proposed disposal configuration.
Date: October 22, 1999
Creator: Davis, J.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calculation of fuel pin failure timing under LOCA conditions

Description: The objective of this research was to develop and demonstrate a methodology for calculation of the time interval between receipt of the containment isolation signals and the first fuel pin failure for loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). Demonstration calculations were performed for a Babcock and Wilcox (B W) design (Oconee) and a Westinghouse (W) 4-loop design (Seabrook). Sensitivity studies were performed to assess the impacts of fuel pin burnup, axial peaking factor, break size, emergency core cooling system (ECCS) availability, and main coolant pump trip on these items. The analysis was performed using a four-code approach, comprised of FRAPCON-2, SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3, TRAC-PF1/MOD1, and FRAP-T6. In addition to the calculation of timing results, this analysis provided a comparison of the capabilities of SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 with TRAC-PF1/MOD1 for large-break LOCA analysis. This paper discusses the methodology employed and the code development efforts required to implement the methodology. The shortest time intervals calculated between initiation of containment isolation and fuel pin failure were 11.4 s and 19.1 for the B W and W plants, respectively. The FRAP-T6 fuel pin failure times calculated using thermal-hydraulic data generated by SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 were more conservative than those calculated using data generated by TRAC-PF1/MOD1. 18 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Jones, K.R.; Wade, N.L.; Siefken, L.J.; Straka, M. & Katsma, K.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SPARC-90: A code for calculating fission product capture in suppression pools

Description: This report describes the technical bases and use of two updated versions of a computer code initially developed to serve as a tool for calculating aerosol particle retention in boiling water reactor (BWR) pressure suppression pools during severe accidents, SPARC-87 and SPARC-90. The most recent version is SPARC-90. The initial or prototype version (Owczarski, Postma, and Schreck 1985) was improved to include the following: rigorous treatment of local particle deposition velocities on the surface of oblate spherical bubbles, new correlations for hydrodynamic behavior of bubble swarms, models for aerosol particle growth, both mechanistic and empirical models for vent exit region scrubbing, specific models for hydrodynamics of bubble breakup at various vent types, and models for capture of vapor iodine species. A complete user's guide is provided for SPARC-90 (along with SPARC-87). A code description, code operating instructions, partial code listing, examples of the use of SPARC-90, and summaries of experimental data comparison studies also support the use of SPARC-90. 29 refs., 4 figs., 11 tabs.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Owczarski, P.C. & Burk, K.W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ground-based testing of space nuclear power plants

Description: Small nuclear power plants for space applications are evaluated according to their testability in this two part report. The first part introduces the issues involved in testing these power plants. Some of the concerns include oxygen embrittlement of critical components, the test environment, the effects of a vacuum environment on materials, the practically of racing an activated test chamber, and possible testing alternative the SEHPTR, king develop at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. 10 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.
Date: October 22, 1990
Creator: McDonald, T.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Safety Analysis Report for Packaging: The unirradiated fuel shipping container USA/9853/AF

Description: The HFBR Unirradiated Fuel Shipping Container was designed and fabricated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1978 for the transport of fuel for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) for Brookhaven National Laboratory. The package has been evaluated analytically, as well as the comparison to tests on similar packages, to demonstrate compliance with the applicable regulations governing packages in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported. The contents of this Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) are based on Regulatory Guide 7.9 (proposed Revision 2 - May 1986), 10 CFR Part 71, DOE Order 1540.2, DOE Order 5480.3, and 49 CFR Part 173.
Date: October 18, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Safety Evaluation Report Restart of K-Reactor Savannah River Site

Description: In April 1991, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued DOE/DP-0084T, Safety Evaluation Report Restart of K-Reactor Savannah River Site.'' The Safety Evaluation Report (SER) documents the results of DOE reviews and evaluations of the programmatic aspects of a large number of issues necessary to be satisfactorily addressed before restart. The issues were evaluated for compliance with the restart criteria included in the SER. The results of those evaluations determined that the restart criteria had been satisfied for some of the issues. However, for most of the issues at least part of the applicable restart criteria had not been found to be satisfied at the time the evaluations were prepared. For those issues, open or confirmatory items were identified that required resolution. In August 1991, DOE issued DOE/DP-0090T, Safety Evaluation Report Restart of K-Reactor Savannah River Site Supplement 1.'' That document was the first Supplement to the April 1991 SER, and documented the resolution of 62 of the open items identified in the SER. This document is the second Supplement to the April 1991 SER. This second SER Supplement documents the resolution of additional open times identified in the SER, and includes a complete list of all remaining SER open items. The resolution of those remaining open items will be documented in future SER Supplements. Resolution of all open items for an issue indicates that its associated restart criteria have been satisfied, and that DOE concludes that the programmatic aspects of the issue have been satisfactorily addressed.
Date: October 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Acceptance criteria for the evaluation of Category 1 fuel cycle facility physical security plans

Description: This NUREG document presents criteria developed from US Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations for the evaluation of physical security plans submitted by Category 1 fuel facility licensees. Category 1 refers to those licensees who use or possess a formula quantity of strategic special nuclear material.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Dwyer, P.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank from the Shippingport reactor

Description: The irradiation embrittlement of neutron shield tank (NST) material (A212 Grade B steel) from the Shippingport reactor has been characterized. Irradiation increases the Charpy transition temperature (CTT) by 23--28{degrees}C (41--50{degrees}F) and decreases the upper-shelf energy. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in high-flux isotope reactor (HFIR) surveillance specimens. However, the actual value of the CTT is higher than that for the HFIR data. The increase in yield stress is 51 MPa (7.4 ksi), which is comparable to HFIR data. The NST material is weaker in the transverse orientation than in the longitudinal orientation. Some effects of position across the thickness of the wall are also observed; the CTT shift is slightly greater for specimens from the inner region of the wall. Annealing studies indicate complete recovery from embrittlement after 1 h at 400{degrees}C (752{degrees}F). Although the weld metal is significantly tougher than the base metal, the shifts in CTT are comparable. The shifts in CTT for the Shippingport NST are consistent with the test and Army reactor data for irradiations at <232{degrees}C (<450{degrees}F) and show very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR). The effects of irradiation temperature, fluence rate, and neutron flux spectrum are discussed. The results indicate that fluence rate has no effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s and at the low operating temperatures of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C (130{degrees}F). This suggests that the accelerated embrittlement of HFIR surveillance samples is most likely due to the relatively higher proportion of thermal neutrons in the HFIR spectrum compared to that for the test reactors. 28 refs., 25 figs.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)) & Rosinski, S.T. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MORECA: A computer code for simulating modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core heatup accidents

Description: The design features of the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) have the potential to make it essentially invulnerable to damage from postulated core heatup accidents. This report describes the ORNL MORECA code, which was developed for analyzing postulated long-term core heatup scenarios for which active cooling systems used to remove afterheat following the accidents can be assumed to the unavailable. Simulations of long-term loss-of-forced-convection accidents, both with and without depressurization of the primary coolant, have shown that maximum core temperatures stay below the point at which any significant fuel failures and fission product releases are expected. Sensitivity studies also have been done to determine the effects of errors in the predictions due both to uncertainties in the modeling and to the assumptions about operational parameters. MORECA models the US Department of Energy reference design of a standard MHTGR.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Ball, S.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chemical and Radiochemical Constituents in Water from Wells in the Vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1996

Description: The U.S. Geological Survey, in response to a request from the U.S. Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office, Idaho Branch Office (IBO), samples water from 13 wells during 1996 as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality to the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho. The IBO requires information about the mobility of radionuclide- and chemical-waste constituents in the Snake River Plain aquifer. Waste-constituent mobility is determined principally by (1) the rate and direction of ground-water flow; (2) the locations, quantities, and methods of waste disposal; (3) waste-constituents chemistry; and (4) the geochemical processes taking place in the aquifer. The purpose of the data-collection program is to provide IBO with water-chemistry data to evaluate the effect of NRF activities on the water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer. Water samples were analyzed for naturally occurring constituents and man-made contaminants.
Date: October 1, 1999
Creator: Knobel, L. L.; Bartholomay, R. C.; Tucker, B. J. & Williams, L. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary report on four foot septifoil cooling experiment

Description: Cooling parameters for some of the SRS reactor internal components are computed using the Transient Reactor Analysis Code, TRAC.'' In order to benchmark the code, the Safety Analysis Group of SRL requested an experiment to provide measurements of cooling parameters in a well defined physical system utilizing SRS reactor component(s). The experiment selected included a short length of septifoil with both top and bottom fittings containing five simulated control rods in an unseated'' configuration. Power level to be supplied to the rods was targeted at 2.5 kilowatts per foot. The septifoil segment was to be operated with no forced flow in order to evaluate thermal-hydraulic cooling. Parameters to be measured for comparison with code predictions were basic cooling phenomena, incidence of film boiling, thermal-hydraulic flow rate, pressure rise, and ratio of heat transfer through the wall of the assembly vs heat transfer to axial water flow through the assembly. Experimental apparatus was designed and assembled incorporating five simulated control rods four feet long, joule heated inside a five foot length of type Q'' septifoil. Water at 70 C was fed independently to the bottom inlet and along the outside of the septifoil. Water flowing along the outside of the septifoil was in confined flow and provided calorimetry to measure power flow through the septifoil housing. A shadowgraph technique was developed and used to monitor unforced flow of water pumped thermal-hydraulically through the septifoil. Electrical power of 10,000 to 70,000 watts was fed to the simulated rods from a dc power supply. Computer data acquisition was accomplished using LabView'' software programmed to match the configuration of the experiment along with scanning digital voltmeters and requisite signal sensors. Video camcorders were used to provide video records of six areas of the experiment.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Randolph, H.W.; Collins, S.L.; Verebelyi, D.T. & Foti, D.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for cancer treatment

Description: This bulletin discusses activities during this reporting period in the areas of: supporting technology development; large animal model studies; melanoma project; human studies; stability, pharmacology, and toxicology of drugs; and PBF technical support. (FL)
Date: October 1, 1990
Creator: Ackermann, A.L. (ed.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THATCH: A computer code for modelling thermal networks of high- temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

Description: This report documents the THATCH code, which can be used to model general thermal and flow networks of solids and coolant channels in two-dimensional r-z geometries. The main application of THATCH is to model reactor thermo-hydraulic transients in High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs). The available modules simulate pressurized or depressurized core heatup transients, heat transfer to general exterior sinks or to specific passive Reactor Cavity Cooling Systems, which can be air or water-cooled. Graphite oxidation during air or water ingress can be modelled, including the effects of added combustion products to the gas flow and the additional chemical energy release. A point kinetics model is available for analyzing reactivity excursions; for instance due to water ingress, and also for hypothetical no-scram scenarios. For most HTGR transients, which generally range over hours, a user-selected nodalization of the core in r-z geometry is used. However, a separate model of heat transfer in the symmetry element of each fuel element is also available for very rapid transients. This model can be applied coupled to the traditional coarser r-z nodalization. This report described the mathematical models used in the code and the method of solution. It describes the code and its various sub-elements. Details of the input data and file usage, with file formats, is given for the code, as well as for several preprocessing and postprocessing options. The THATCH model of the currently applicable 350 MW{sub th} reactor is described. Input data for four sample cases are given with output available in fiche form. Installation requirements and code limitations, as well as the most common error indications are listed. 31 refs., 23 figs., 32 tabs.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Kroeger, P.G.; Kennett, R.J.; Colman, J. & Ginsberg, T. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Steady-state and loss-of-pumping accident analyses of the Savannah River new production reactor representative design

Description: This document contains the steady-state and loss-of-pumping accident analysis of the representative design for the Savannah River heavy water new production reactor. A description of the reactor system and computer input model, the results of the steady-state analysis, and the results of four loss-of-pumping accident calculations are presented. 5 refs., 37 figs., 4 tabs.
Date: October 1, 1990
Creator: Pryor, R.J. & Maloney, K.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ABWR (advanced boiling water reactor) Design Verification Program

Description: The ABWR Design Verification Program is aimed at restoring confidence in the US licensing process by demonstrating its workability by obtaining USNRC preapproval of GE's ABWR Standard Plant. The purpose of this work is to achieve full NRC approval of the ABWR through the award of an NRC Staff final design approval (FDA) and design certification. The approach is to (1) establish a licensing basis with the NRC Staff for the ABWR, (2) prepare and submit, for NRC Staff review, an SSAR to obtain an FDA, and (3) participate in a rulemaking process to obtain certification of the ABWR design. This program was initiated August 27, 1986. This report, the fourth annual progress report, summarizes progress on this program from October 1, 1989 through September 30, 1990. 9 refs., 5 tabs.
Date: October 1, 1990
Creator: Fox, J.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Space nuclear power requirements for ozone layer modification

Description: This work estimates the power requirements for using photochemical processes driven by space nuclear power to counteract the Earth's ozone layer depletion. The total quantity of ozone (O{sub 3}) in the Earth's atmosphere is estimated to be about 4.7 {times} 10{sup 37} molecules. The ozone production and destruction rates in the stratosphere are both on the order of 4.9 {times} 10{sup 31} molecules/s, differing by a small fraction so that the net depletion rate is about 0.16 to 0.26% per year. The delivered optical power requirement for offsetting this depletion is estimated to be on the order of 3 GW. If the power were produced by satellite reactors at 800 km altitude (orbit decay time {approximately} 300 years), some means of efficient power beaming would be needed to deliver the power to stratospheric levels (10--50 km). Ultraviolet radiation at 140--150 nm could have higher absorption rates in O{sub 2} (leading to production of atomic oxygen, which can combine with O{sub 2} to form O{sub 3}) than in ozone (leading to photodissociation of O{sub 3}). Potential radiation sources include H{sub 2} lasers and direct nuclear pumping of ultraviolet fluorescers. 5 refs.
Date: October 15, 1991
Creator: Dolan, T.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of thermosyphoning in a steam generator model

Description: An analysis of thermosyphoning in a stream generator model is presented. The model considers the transient development of buoyancy-driven steam flow in the steam generator tubing, secondary side heat transfer and an inlet plenum mixing model. Numerical solutions are obtained for conditions intended to simulate the natural circulation phenomena in a 3-Loop pressurized water reactor in a loss-of-coolant accident scenario. The relation between the circulation rate and the heating rate is determined. The sensitivity of the model to various key parameters is examined. 16 refs.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Martinez, M.J. & Martinez, G.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transactions of the nineteenth water reactor safety information meeting

Description: This report contains summaries of papers on reactor safety research to be presented at the 19th Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel in Bethesda, Maryland, October 28--30, 1991. The summaries briefly describe the programs and results of nuclear safety research sponsored by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, USNRC. Summaries of invited papers concerning nuclear safety issues from US government laboratories, the electric utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the nuclear industry, and from the governments and industry in Europe and Japan are also included. The summaries have been compiled in one report to provide a basis for meaningful discussion and information exchange during the course of the meeting, and are given in the order of their presentation in each session. The individual summaries have been cataloged separately.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Weiss, A. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transformer failure and common-mode loss of instrument power at Nine Mile Point Unit 2 on August 13, 1991

Description: On August 13, 1991, at Nine Mile Point Unit 2 nuclear power plant, located near Scriba, New York, on Lake Ontario, the main transformer experienced an internal failure that resulted in degraded voltage which caused the simultaneous loss of five uninterruptible power supplies, which in turn caused the loss of several nonsafety systems, including reactor control rod position indication, some reactor power and water indication, control room annunciators, the plant communications system, the plant process computer, and lighting at some locations. The reactor was subsequently brought to a safe shutdown. Following this event, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission dispatched an Incident Investigation Team to the site to determine what happened, to identify the probable causes, and to make appropriate findings and conclusions. This report describes the incident, the methodology used by the team in its investigation, and presents and the team's findings and conclusions. 59 figs., 14 tabs.
Date: October 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparisons of HELIOS Calculated Isotope Concentrations to Measured Values for Several Reactor Systems

Description: Heavy metal and fission product noble gas concentrations in spent fuel from two different PWR'S were calculated using HELIOS and compared to measured results from the literature. It was found that for the U-235/U-238 and Pu-240/Pu-239 isotopic ratios, the HELIOS calculation agreed to within the experimental uncertainty. For the Xe-131/Xe-134 isotopic ratios, HELIOS tended to overestimate the result by up to 4%. Conversely for the Xe-132/Xe-134 ratios, HELIOS underestimated the result by a slight amount ({approximately}1%). This suggests that either the fission product yields for Xe-131 and Xe-132 should be slightly altered or that the absorption cross-section for Xe-131 should be slightly increased. More analysis is necessary to determine which of these two alternatives is more appropriate. This work has shown that the accuracy of HELIOS (within 2% for heavy metals and within 4% for fission noble gases) is sufficient for most analyses.
Date: October 21, 1998
Creator: Charlton, W.S.; Perry, R.T.; Fearey, B.L. & Parish, T.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Synergistic failure of BWR internals

Description: Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) core shrouds and other reactor internals important to safety are experiencing intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission has followed the problem, and as part of its investigations, contracted with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to conduct a risk assessment. The overall project objective is to assess the potential consequences and risks associated with the failure of IGSCC-susceptible BWR vessel internals, with specific consideration given to potential cascading and common mode effects. An initial phase has been completed in which background material was gathered and evaluated, and potential accident sequences were identified. A second phase is underway to perform a simplified, quantitative probabilistic risk assessment on a representative high-power BWR/4. Results of the initial study conducted on the jet pumps show that any cascading failures would not result in a significant increase in the core damage frequency. The methodology is currently being extended to other major reactor internals components.
Date: October 25, 1999
Creator: Ware, A. G. & Chang, T. Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department