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Story of The Sea Sand Pot recited by Ibrahim

Description: Recording of Ibrahim reciting “The Sea Sand Pot” in the Nagar dialect of Burushaski. In this popular story a King tells all of his subjects to kill their old parents, but an obedient son hides his father in a trench. Afterward, the King orders the subjects to make a sea sand pot, or a sand chidin, which is a large iron pot used to make food for a thousand people for festivals. None of the villagers knew how, so they approached the hidden father, who told them that it was an impossible task. They told the King that the task was accomplished, but this wisdom proved to the King that an elderly person was saved.
Date: October 15, 2012
Creator: Ibrahim
Partner: UNT College of Information

Story of Surung Thuku recited by Abida

Description: Recording of Abida reciting “Surung Thuku” in the Nagar dialect of Burushaski. This popular story is told to kids. A man named Surung Thuku is taken captive by an evil grandmother who wishes to eat him, but he tricks her into eating her granddaughter instead, and escapes
Date: July 28, 2010
Creator: Abida
Partner: UNT College of Information

Story of Adam and Eve by

Description: Transcription and free English translation of the recording of Gulzar Bibi narrating the story of "Hazrat Adam and Zizi Hawa" (Adam and Eve). Gulzar Bibi is a speaker of Srinagar Burushaski.
Date: Autumn 2004
Creator: Munshi, Sadaf
Partner: UNT College of Information

Title I: Although Definitions of Administrative Expenditures Vary, Almost All Districts Studied Spent Less Than 10 Percent on Administration

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Because of concern about school district spending on administration, Congress directed GAO in two separate mandates in the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 to (1) examine how school districts defined and spent Title I funds on administrative activities and (2) review Title I expenditures in at least six school districts. In response to these mandates, we are reporting on (1) how five studies define Title I administrative expenditures and what they found about the percentage of funds spent on these activities and (2) what proportion of Title I funds was spent on administrative activities compared with instructional and other activities in six school districts."
Date: April 7, 2003
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Title I Funding: Poor Children Benefit Though Funding Per Poor Child Differs

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "The Title I program spends $8 billion each year on elementary and secondary education. Although state and local funds account for more than 90 percent of national education expenditures, Title I has been an important source of funding for many poor school districts and schools since 1965. In the 1999-2000 school year, Title I funds were targeted on the basis of numbers and percentages of poor children, but the complex allocation process resulted in differences in actual funding per poor child. When the numbers of children from low-income families shift among states, Title I allocations adjust, but not completely, and a state whose share of the nation's poor children changed from year to year would not necessarily see a corresponding change in its Title I allocation amount. The following two factors account for this: lack of current poverty data and various hold-harmless provisions. GAO found no monetary, statutory, or regulatory incentives for states to target their own funds to children from low-income families. Several policy options could increase Title I funds allocated to states and school districts with high numbers and percentages of poor children. These options include changing the appropriations hold-harmless provisions, funding the targeted grant, using an alternative cost factor, and raising the basic grant eligibility threshold."
Date: January 15, 2002
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Title I Program: Stronger Accountability Needed for Performance of Disadvantaged Students

Description: A chapter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Pursuant to a congressional request, GAO provided information on: (1) Title I services at schoolwide and targeted assistance schools; (2) state efforts to hold schools and districts accountable for student achievement; and (3) research and evaluations of Title I and schoolwide programs."
Date: June 1, 2000
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Title I: Characteristics of Tests Will Influence Expenses; Information Sharing May Help States Realize Efficiencies

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLBA) reauthorized the $10 billion Title I program, which seeks to improve the educational achievement of 12.5 million students at risk. In passing the legislation, Congress increased the frequency with which states are to measure student achievement in mathematics and reading and added science as another subject. Congress also authorized funding to support state efforts to develop and implement tests for this purpose. Congress mandated that GAO study the costs of implementing the required tests. This report describes characteristics of states' Title I tests, provides estimates of what states may spend to implement the required tests, and identifies factors that explain variation in expenses."
Date: May 8, 2003
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller

Description: The goal of this study was to develop a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller (RIVEC) to reduce the energy impact of required mechanical ventilation by 20percent, maintain or improve indoor air quality and provide demand response benefits. This represents potential energy savings of about 140 GWh of electricity and 83 million therms of natural gas as well as proportional peak savings in California. The RIVEC controller is intended to meet the 2008 Title 24 requirements for residential ventilation as well as taking into account the issues of outdoor conditions, other ventilation devices (including economizers), peak demand concerns and occupant preferences. The controller is designed to manage all the residential ventilation systems that are currently available. A key innovation in this controller is the ability to implement the concept of efficacy and intermittent ventilation which allows time shifting of ventilation. Using this approach ventilation can be shifted away from times of high cost or high outdoor pollution towards times when it is cheaper and more effective. Simulations, based on the ones used to develop the new residential ventilation requirements for the California Buildings Energy code, were used to further define the specific criteria and strategies needed for the controller. These simulations provide estimates of the energy, peak power and contaminant improvement possible for different California climates for the various ventilation systems. Results from a field test of the prototype controller corroborate the predicted performance.
Date: December 1, 2011
Creator: Scientist, Staff; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max & Dickerhoff, Darryl
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department