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Pressure phase lines and enthalpies for the. cap alpha. -. beta. and. beta. -liquid transitions in beryllium

Description: The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the ..cap alpha..-..beta.. and ..beta..-liquid transition temperatures in Be was measured in a gas pressure system. Differential thermal analysis was used in the pressure range from 0.1 MPa to 0.7 GPa. For the ..cap alpha..-..beta.. transition, dT/dP = 43 +- 7 K/GPa; for the ..beta..-liquid transition, dT/dP = 35 +- 7 K/GPa. Although it is possible that large systematic errors may arise from experimental procedures, our results are seriously at odds with those of other investigators. Transition enthalpies for the ..cap alpha..-..beta.. and ..beta..-liquid transitions were 1.9 +- 0.2 and 2.2 +- 0.2 kcal/g.m., respectively, at a pressure of 0.1 MPa.
Date: October 31, 1984
Creator: Abey, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORT FOR PACKAGING, MODEL 9977, ADDENDUM 3, JUSTIFICATION FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITY CONTENTS

Description: This Addendum establishes a new family of content envelopes consisting of small quantities of radioactive materials. These content envelopes and specific packing configurations are shown to be subcritical. However, the dose rates of some payloads must be measured and shown to comply with applicable radiation limits. Authorization for shipment of the content envelop requires acceptance of this Addendum by the DOE-HQ certifying official as a supplement to the 9977 SARP Revision 2 and DOE-HQ�s subsequent revision of the CoC Revision 10 (which is based on SARP Addendum 2 and SARP Addendum 4) to authorize the additional content envelope. The Small Gram Quantity Content Envelopes and packing configurations will be incorporated in the next revision of the 9977 SARP.
Date: October 31, 2011
Creator: Abramczyk, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan

Description: The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at …
Date: October 31, 2004
Creator: Ackerman, T
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Radioisotopic Assessment of Cerebral Edema.

Description: No Description Available.
Date: October 31, 1970
Creator: Adatepe, M. H.; Studer, R.; Perez, C. & Potchen, E. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Diffusion of Uranium with Various Transitional Metals; DIFFUSION DE L'URANIUM AVEC QUELQUES METAUX DE TRANSITION

Description: The diffusion process in uranium and its alloys was studied from 550 to 1075 deg C with diffusion couples of U with Zr, Mo, Ti, and Nb and with the alloys U--Nb and U--Mo. A brief description is given of the experimental methods. Results relative to the concentration-penetration curves are presented, and the coefficients of diffusion are calculated. The equilibrium diagram was established for the U--Zr system. The results obtained by micrographic examination, microhardness measurements, and autoradiography are compared with each other. The mechanisms of diffusion are investigated by studying the Kirkendall effect and calculating the Darken intrinsic coeffi cients in the U--Zr and U--UMo diffusion couples. (J.S.R.)
Date: October 31, 1959
Creator: Adda, Y. & Philibert, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Investigation of mixed metal sorbent/catalysts for the simultaneous removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides. Semiannual report, Apr 1, 1998--Oct 31, 1998

Description: Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded investigation of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823--900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4} air mixtures. The sorbents consisting of cerium oxide and copper oxide impregnated on alumina have been prepared and characterized. Their sulfation performance has been investigated in a TGA setup, studying mainly the effects of temperature and …
Date: October 31, 1998
Creator: Akyurtlu, Dr. Ates & Akyurtlu, Dr. Jale F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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GAUGE FOR MEASURING BOW OF TUBES

Description: A mechanical gage was designed to measure the bow over any one-foot length of long cylindrical material. The gage was used successfully for measuring bow in components of tubular fuel elements at the Savannah River Laboratory. (auth)
Date: October 31, 1962
Creator: Alewine, G.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Final Report - DOE Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics

Description: This Final Report summarizes the significant progress made by the researchers, students and staff of the Center for Laser Imaging and Cancer Diagnostics (CLICD) from January 1998 through May 2002. During this period, the Center supported several projects. Most projects were proposed initially, some were added subsequently as their relevance and importance to the DOE mission became evident. DOE support has been leveraged to obtain continuing funding for some projects. Leveraged funds come from various sources, including NIH, Army, NSF and the Air Force. The goal of the Center was to develop laser-based instruments for use in the detection and diagnosis of major diseases, with an emphasis on detection and diagnosis of various cancers. Each of the supported projects is a collaborative effort between physicists and laser scientists and the City College of New York and noted physicians, surgeons, pathologists, and biologists located at medical centers in the Metropolitan area. The participating institutions were: City College of New York Institute for Ultrafast Lasers and Spectroscopy, Hackensack University Medical Center, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and New York Eye and Ear Institute. Each of the projects funded by the Center is grouped into one of four research categories: a) Disease Detection, b) Non-Disease Applications, c) New Diagnostic Tools, and, d) Education, Training, Outreach and Dissemination. The progress achieved by the multidisciplinary teams was reported in 51 publications and 32 presentations at major national conferences. Also, one U.S. patent was obtained and six U.S. patent applications have been filed for innovations resulting from the projects sponsored by the Center.
Date: October 31, 2002
Creator: Alfano, Robert R. & Koutcher, Jason A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Energy savings by means of fuel cell electrodes in electro-chemical industries. Annual report for August 1, 1978-July 31, 1979

Description: The objectives of the subject program are: to evaluate experimentally, on a laboratory scale, energy and cost savings in electrowinning of zinc by substituting, for the conventional lead anode, a Prototech proprietary hydrogen anode operating on pure and impure feeds; to similarly evaluate experimentally, again on a laboratory scale, voltage, and thus energy savings in chlor-alkali membrane cells by substituting, for the conventional steel cathode, a Prototech proprietary air cathode; to consult with Lockheed and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) on the subject of suitable air electrodes for metal/water/air batteries; and prepare cost estimates of all processes investigated based on laboratory results.
Date: October 31, 1979
Creator: Allen, R. J.; Juda, W.; Lindstrom, R. W. & Petrow, H. G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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