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Global NOx Measurements in Turbulent Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Flames

Description: Turbulent hydrogen diffusion flames diluted with nitrogen are currently being studied to assess their ability to achieve the DOE Turbine Program’s aggressive emissions goal of 2 ppm NOx in a hydrogen-fueled IGCC gas turbine combustor. Since the unstrained adiabatic flame temperatures of these diluted flames are not low enough to eliminate thermal NOx formation the focus of the current work is to study how the effects of flame residence time and global flame strain can be used to help achieve the stated NOx emissions goal. Dry NOx measurements are presented as a function of jet diameter nitrogen dilution and jet velocity for a turbulent hydrogen/nitrogen jet issuing from a thin-lipped tube in an atmospheric pressure combustor. The NOx emission indices from these experiments are normalized by the flame residence time to ascertain the effects of global flame strain and fuel Lewis Number on the NOx emissions. In addition dilute hydrogen diffusion flame experiments were performed in a high-pressure combustor at 2 4 and 8 atm. The NOx emission data from these experiments are discussed as well as the results from a Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling effort currently underway to help explain the experimental data.
Date: March 1, 2007
Creator: Weiland, N.T. & Strakey, P.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Impact of Fuel Interchangeability on dynamic Instabilities in Gas Turbine Engines

Description: Modern, low NOx emitting gas turbines typically utilize lean pre-mixed (LPM) combustion as a means of achieving target emissions goals. As stable combustion in LPM systems is somewhat intolerant to changes in operating conditions, precise engine tuning on a prescribed range of fuel properties is commonly performed to avoid dynamic instabilities. This has raised concerns regarding the use of imported liquefied natural gas (LNG) and natural gas liquids (NGL’s) to offset a reduction in the domestic natural gas supply, which when introduced into the pipeline could alter the fuel BTU content and subsequently exacerbate problems such as combustion instabilities. The intent of this study is to investigate the sensitivity of dynamically unstable test rigs to changes in fuel composition and heat content. Fuel Wobbe number was controlled by blending methane and natural gas with various amounts of ethane, propane and nitrogen. Changes in combustion instabilities were observed, in both atmospheric and pressurized test rigs, for fuels containing high concentrations of propane (> 62% by vol). However, pressure oscillations measured while operating on typical “LNG like” fuels did not appear to deviate significantly from natural gas and methane flame responses. Mechanisms thought to produce changes in the dynamic response are discussed.
Date: March 1, 2007
Creator: Ferguson, D.H.; Straub, D.L.; Richards, G.A. & Robey, E.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Operation of a Flame Ionization Sensor

Description: The sensors and controls research group at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is continuing to develop the Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor (CCADS) for gas turbine applications. CCADS uses the electrical conduction of the charged species generated during the combustion process to detect combustion instabilities and monitor equivalence ratio. As part of this effort, combustion models are being developed which include the interaction between the electric field and the transport of charged species. The primary combustion process is computed using a flame wrinkling model (Weller et. al. 1998) which is a component of the OpenFOAM toolkit (Jasak et. al. 2004). A sub-model for the transport of charged species is attached to this model. The formulation of the charged-species model similar that applied by Penderson and Brown (1993) for the simulation of laminar flames. The sub-model consists of an additional flux due to the electric field (drift flux) added to the equations for the charged species concentrations and the solution the electric potential from the resolved charge density. The subgrid interactions between the electric field and charged species transport have been neglected. Using the above procedure, numerical simulations are performed and the results compared with several recent CCADS experiments.
Date: March 1, 2007
Creator: Huckaby, E.D.; Chorpening, B.T. & Thornton, J.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of Propane/Natural Gas Blended Fuels on Gas Turbine Pollutant Emissions

Description: Liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports to the U.S. are expected to grow significantly over the next 10-15 years. Likewise, it is expected that changes to the domestic gas supply may also introduce changes in natural gas composition. As a result of these anticipated changes, the composition of fuel sources may vary significantly from conventional domestic natural gas supplies. This paper will examine the effects of fuel variability on pollutant emissions for premixed gas turbine conditions. The experimental data presented in this paper have been collected from a pressurized single injector combustion test rig at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The tests are conducted at 7.5 atm with a 588 K air preheat. A propane blending facility is used to vary the Wobbe Index of the site natural gas. The results indicate that propane addition of about five (vol.) percent does not lead to a significant change in the observed NOx or CO emissions. These results are different from data collected on some engine applications and potential reasons for these differences will be described.
Date: March 1, 2007
Creator: Straub, D. L.; Ferguson, D. H.; Casleton, K. H. & Richards, G. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department