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Simulation Modeling of an Enhanced Low-Emission Swirl-Cascade Burner

Description: ''Cascade-burners'' is a passive technique to control the stoichiometry of the flame through changing the flow dynamics and rates of mixing in the combustion zone with a set of venturis surrounding the flame. Cascade-burners have shown advantages over other techniques; its reliability, flexibility, safety, and cost makes it more attractive and desirable. On the other hand, the application of ''Swirl-burners'' has shown superiority in producing a stable flame under a variety of operating conditions and fuel types. The basic idea is to impart swirl to the air or fuel stream, or both. This not only helps to stabilize the flame but also enhances mixing in the combustion zone. As a result, nonpremixed (diffusion) swirl burners have been increasingly used in industrial combustion systems such as gas turbines, boilers, and furnaces, due to their advantages of safety and stability. Despite the advantages of cascade and swirl burners, both are passive control techniques, which resulted in a moderate pollutant emissions reduction compared to SCR, SNCR and FGR (active) methods. The present investigation will study the prospects of combining both techniques in what to be named as ''an enhanced swirl-cascade burner''. Natural gas jet diffusion flames in baseline, cascade, swirl, and swirl-cascade burners were numerically modeled using CFDRC package. The thermal, composition, and flow (velocity) fields were simulated. The numerical results showed that swirl and cascade burners have a more efficient fuel/air mixing, a shorter flame, and a lower NOx emission levels, compared to the baseline case. The results also revealed that the optimal configurations of the cascaded and swirling flames have not produced an improved performance when combined together in a ''swirl-cascade burner''. The non-linearity and complexity of the system accounts for such a result, and therefore, all possible combinations, i.e. swirl numbers (SN) versus venturi diameter ratios (D/d), need to be ...
Date: September 1, 2004
Creator: Qubbaj, Ala
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

Description: The field operator, Goldrus Producing Company, has been unable to secure funding needed to continue the field demonstration phase of the project. Accordingly, we have temporarily halted all project activities until necessary funding is obtained. Goldrus felt confident that funds could be acquired by third quarter 2005 at which time it would have been necessary to request a project extension to complete the originally designed study. A project extension was granted but it appears Goldrus will have difficulty securing funds. We Bureau of Economic Geology are investigating a new approach on how to fulfill our initial objectives of promoting high-pressure air injection of Ellenburger reservoirs.
Date: February 1, 2006
Creator: Loucks, Robert & Ruppel, Stephen C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Overview of Recent Logging Research at The University of Texas Petroleum Engineering Department

Description: Logging research at The University of Texas has been carried out in several areas. We have studied how rock resistivity varies with water saturation when other variables, such as rock wettability, stress, saturation history, and shale content are varied. Both experimental and theoretical work have been done. Rock wettability (oil or water wet) has by far the largest effect. Shale content and saturation history are also important. Rock stress is the least important, at least in the Berea sandstones and glass bed packs we have studied. We have published several papers and theses which describe this work in detail. We have also studied the effect of certain trace elements (boron, mainly) on the neutron log. Boron has a very high thermal neutron capture cross Section. Analyses of a number of Frio formation cores from the Texas Gulf Coast area show that boron occurs frequently in these rocks in amounts (up to 100 ppm or more) that would seriously affect several procedures in neutron log interpretation. It could, for example, reduce or even eliminate the neutron log--density log porosity reversal that is commonly used as a gas indicator. A recent paper reports details of our work in the Frio. We are currently extending our trace element studies to the West Texas area. The lower porosities occurring there make a given boron content in the rock even more important than in the higher porosity Gulf Coast area. Another effort has been the application of logging data to obtain better estimates of rock type, and inferentially, rock permeability. The work is semi-empirical, and results are usually limited in application geographically. These results can be very important, however; for example, when extrapolating core data to parts of a field where no cores were taken. Several papers have reported details of this work, which is ...
Date: March 21, 1989
Creator: Dunlap, H. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate

Description: The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. In Campaign 3 of the pilot plant, the overall mass transfer coefficient for the stripper with 7 m MEA decreased from 0.06 to 0.01 mol/(m{sup 3}.s.kPa) as the rich loading increased from 0.45 to 0.6 mol CO{sub 2}/mol MEA. Anion chromatography has demonstrated that nitrate and nitrite are major degradation products of MEA and PZ with pure oxygen. In measurements with the high temperature FTIR in 7 m MEA the MEA vapor pressure varied from 2 to 20 Pa at 35 to 70 C. In 2.5 m PZ the PZ vapor pressure varied from 0.2 to 1 Pa from 37 to 70 C.
Date: January 26, 2005
Creator: Rochelle, Gary T.; Hilliard, Marcus; Chen, Eric; Oyenekan, Babatunde; Dugas, Ross; McLees, John et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CO2 Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate

Description: The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. The final campaign of the pilot plant was completed in February 2006 with 5m K{sup +}/2.5m PZ and 6.4m K{sup +}/1.6m PZ using Flexipac AQ Style 20. The new cross-exchanger reduced the approach temperature to less than 9 C. Stripper modeling has demonstrated that a configuration with a ''Flashing Feed'' requires 6% less work that a simple stripper. The oxidative degradation of piperazine proceeds more slowly than that of monoethanolamine and produces ethylenediamine and other products. Uninhibited 5 m KHCO{sub 3}/2.5 m PZ corrodes 5 to 6 times faster that 30% MEA with 0.2 mol CO{sub 2}/mol MEA.
Date: April 28, 2006
Creator: Rochelle, Gary T.; Chen, Eric; Oyenekan, Babatunde; Sexton, Andrew & Veawab, Amorvadee
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir

Description: Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on ...
Date: September 30, 2006
Creator: Loucks, Robert; Ruppel, Stephen C.; Dhiraj, Dembla; Gale, Julia; Holder, Jon; Kane, Jeff et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Treatment of Produced Water Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System

Description: Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. Produced waters typically contain a high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component as well as chemicals added during the oil-production process. It has been estimated that a total of 14 billion barrels of produced water were generated in 2002 from onshore operations (Veil, 2004). Although much of this produced water is disposed via reinjection, environmental and cost considerations can make surface discharge of this water a more practical means of disposal. In addition, reinjection is not always a feasible option because of geographic, economic, or regulatory considerations. In these situations, it may be desirable, and often necessary from a regulatory viewpoint, to treat produced water before discharge. It may also be feasible to treat waters that slightly exceed regulatory limits for re-use in arid or drought-prone areas, rather than losing them to reinjection. A previous project conducted under DOE Contract DE-AC26-99BC15221 demonstrated that surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) represents a potential treatment technology for produced water containing BTEX. Laboratory and field experiments suggest that: (1) sorption of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) to SMZ follows linear isotherms in which sorption increases with increasing solute hydrophobicity; (2) the presence of high salt concentrations substantially increases the capacity of the SMZ for BTEX; (3) competitive sorption among the BTEX compounds is negligible; and, (4) complete recovery of the SMZ sorption capacity for BTEX can be achieved by air sparging the SMZ. This report summarizes research for a follow on project to optimize the regeneration process for multiple sorption/regeneration cycles, and to develop and incorporate a vapor phase bioreactor (VPB) system for treatment of the off-gas generated during air sparging. To this end, we ...
Date: January 31, 2006
Creator: Katz, Lynn E.; Kinney, Kerry A.; Bowman, Robert S.; Sullivan, Enid J.; Kwon, Soondong; Darby, Elaine B. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Treatment of Produced Waters Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System

Description: This report summarizes work performed on this project from April 2005 through September 2005. In previous work, a series of laboratory scale experiments were conducted to determine the feasibility of using a SMZ system coupled with a VPB to remove and ultimately destroy the organic pollutants found in produced water. Based on the laboratory scale data, a field test of the process was conducted at the McGrath Salt Water Disposal facility in July and August of 2005. The system performed well over repeated feed and regeneration cycles demonstrating the viability of the process for long term operation. Of the BTEX components present in the produced water, benzene had the lowest adsorption affinity for the SMZ and thus controlled the sorption cycle length. Regeneration of the SMZ using air sparging was found to be sufficient in the field to maintain the SMZ adsorption capacity and to allow continuous operation of the system. As expected, the BTEX concentrations in the regeneration off gas stream were initially very high in a given regeneration cycle. However, a granular activated carbon buffering column placed upstream of the VPB reduced the peak BTEX concentrations to acceptable levels for the VPB. In this way, the VPB was able to maintain stable performance over the entire SMZ regeneration period despite the intermittent nature of the feed.
Date: September 11, 2005
Creator: Kwon, Soondong; Darby, Elaine B.; Chen, Li-Jung; Katz, Lynn E.; Kinney, Kerry A.; Bowman, R. S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Treatment of Produced Waters Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System

Description: This report summarizes work performed on this project from April 2004 through September 2004. Our previous work demonstrated that a polyurethane foam biofilter could successfully biodegrade the BTEX contaminants found in the SMZ regeneration waste gas stream. However, establishing the biomass on the polyurethane foam packing was relatively time consuming and daily recirculation of a concentrated nutrient solution was required for efficient operation of the foam biofilter. To simplify the start up and operating requirements of the biofilter system, a simple, compost-based biofilter was investigated for its ability to treat the BTEX contaminants generated during the SMZ regeneration process. The investigation of the compost biofilter was divided into three experimental phases that spanned 180 days of biofilter operation. During Phase 1, the biofilter was continuously supplied a BTEX-contaminated waste gas stream. During Phase 2, a series of periodic shutdown tests were conducted to assess how the biofilter responded when the BTEX feed was discontinued for periods ranging from 1 day to 2.8 days. The Phase 3 experiments focused on determining how the biofilter would handle periodic spikes in inlet BTEX concentration as would be expected when it is coupled with an SMZ column. Results from the continuous feed (Phase 1) experiments demonstrated that the compost biofilter could maintain BTEX removals of greater than 98% within two weeks of startup. Results of the shutdown experiments indicated that benzene removal was the most sensitive to interruptions in the BTEX feed. Nevertheless, the BTEX removal efficiency exceeded 95% within 6 hours of reestablishing the BTEX feed to the biofilter. When the biofilter was subjected to periodic spikes in BTEX concentration (Phase 3), it was found that the total BTEX removal efficiency stabilized at approximately 75% despite the fact that the biofilter was only fed BTEX contaminants 8 hours per day. Finally, the effects ...
Date: September 11, 2004
Creator: Katz, Lynn E.; Kinney, Kerry A.; Bowman, R. S. & Sullivan, E. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Treatment of Produced Waters Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System

Description: This report summarizes work of this project from October 2003 through March 2004. The major focus of the research was to further investigate BTEX removal from produced water, to quantify metal ion removal from produced water, and to evaluate a lab-scale vapor phase bioreactor (VPB) for BTEX destruction in off-gases produced during SMZ regeneration. Batch equilibrium sorption studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of semi-volatile organic compounds commonly found in produced water on the sorption of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) onto surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) and to examine selected metal ion sorption onto SMZ. The sorption of polar semi-volatile organic compounds and metals commonly found in produced water onto SMZ was also investigated. Batch experiments were performed in a synthetic saline solution that mimicked water from a produced water collection facility in Wyoming. Results indicated that increasing concentrations of semi-volatile organic compounds increased BTEX sorption. The sorption of phenol compounds could be described by linear isotherms, but the linear partitioning coefficients decreased with increasing pH, especially above the pKa's of the compounds. Linear correlations relating partitioning coefficients of phenol compounds with their respective solubilities and octanol-water partitioning coefficients were developed for data collected at pH 7.2. The sorption of chromate, selenate, and barium in synthetic produced water were also described by Langmuir isotherms. Experiments conducted with a lab-scale vapor phase bioreactor (VPB) packed with foam indicated that this system could achieve high BTEX removal efficiencies once the nutrient delivery system was optimized. The xylene isomers and benzene were found to require the greatest biofilter bed depth for removal. This result suggested that these VOCs would ultimately control the size of the biofilter required for the produced water application. The biofilter recovered rapidly from shutdowns showing that the system was resilient to discontinuous feed conditions therefore provided flexibility on ...
Date: March 11, 2004
Creator: Katz, Lynn E.; Kinney, Kerry A.; Bowman, R. S. & Sullivan, E. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Treatment of Produced Waters Using a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System

Description: This report summarizes work performed on this project from October 2004 through March 2005. In previous work, a surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) was shown to be an effective system for removing BTEX contaminants from produced water. Additional work on this project demonstrated that a compost-based biofilter could biodegrade the BTEX contaminants found in the SMZ regeneration waste gas stream. However, it was also determined that the BTEX concentrations in the waste gas stream varied significantly during the regeneration period and the initial BTEX concentrations were too high for the biofilter to handle effectively. A series of experiments were conducted to determine the feasibility of using a passive adsorption column placed upstream of the biofilter to attenuate the peak gas-phase VOC concentrations delivered to the biofilter during the SMZ regeneration process. In preparation for the field test of the SMZ/VPB treatment system in New Mexico, a pilot-scale SMZ system was also designed and constructed during this reporting period. Finally, a cost and feasibility analysis was also completed. To investigate the merits of the passive buffering system during SMZ regeneration, two adsorbents, SMZ and granular activated carbon (GAC) were investigated in flow-through laboratory-scale columns to determine their capacity to handle steady and unsteady VOC feed conditions. When subjected to a toluene-contaminated air stream, the column containing SMZ reduced the peak inlet 1000 ppmv toluene concentration to 630 ppmv at a 10 second contact time. This level of buffering was insufficient to ensure complete removal in the downstream biofilter and the contact time was longer than desired. For this reason, using SMZ as a passive buffering system for the gas phase contaminants was not pursued further. In contrast to the SMZ results, GAC was found to be an effective adsorbent to handle the peak contaminant concentrations that occur early during the SMZ regeneration ...
Date: March 11, 2005
Creator: Kwon, Soondong; Darby, Elaine B.; Chen, Li-Jung; Katz, Lynn E.; Kinney, Kerry A.; Bowman, R. S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Operation of a Public Geologic Core and Sample Repository in Houstion, Texas

Description: The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the US, and even the world. As reported in the 2004-2005 technical progress report to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently now houses over 600,000 boxes of rock material, and has space to hold approximately 300,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has remained strong during this fourth year of operation; the number of patrons averaged nearly 150 per month from June 1, to 2005 May 31, 2006. This usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. These numbers are in addition to the numerous daily requests from patrons desiring to have rock material shipped offsite to their own offices. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and cash totaling approximately $2.2 million during the 2005-2006 operating period. All of these funds went directly into an endowment that will, when complete, endow the HRC in perpetuity. Specific details regarding the funds in the endowment are addressed in a table later in this report. Outreach during 2005 and 2006 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year include securing donations of rock material and cash to approach full funding of the HRC endowment. Thanks to donations totaling $2.2 million from Shea Homes (heritage Unocal rock material), Chevron and others this operating year, the ...
Date: April 14, 2006
Creator: Tinker, Scott W. & DeJarnett, Beverly Blakeney
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Play Analysis and Digital Portfolio of Major Oil Reservoirs in the Permian Basin: Application and Transfer of Advanced Geological and Engineering Technologies for Incremental Production Opportunities

Description: A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest onshore petroleum-producing basin in the United States. Approximately 1,300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000. Of these significant-sized reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. There are 32 geologic plays that have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs, and each of the 1,300 major reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. The final reservoir shapefile for each play contains the geographic location of each reservoir. Associated reservoir information within the linked data tables includes RRC reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are smaller than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production of >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl [5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), ...
Date: January 13, 2004
Creator: Dutton, Shirley P.; Kim, Eugene M.; Broadhead, Ronald F.; Breton, Caroline L.; Raatz, William D.; Ruppel, Stephen C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir

Description: The field operator, Goldrus Producing Company, has been unable to secure funding needed to continue the field demonstration phase of the project. Accordingly, we have temporarily halted all project activities until necessary funding is obtained. Goldrus is confident that funds can be acquired by third quarter 2005 at which time it will be necessary to request a project extension to complete the originally designed study.
Date: March 31, 2005
Creator: Loucks, Robert & Ruppel, Stephen C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Framework to Design and Optimize Chemical Flooding Processes

Description: The goal of this proposed research is to provide an efficient and user friendly simulation framework for screening and optimizing chemical/microbial enhanced oil recovery processes. The framework will include (1) a user friendly interface to identify the variables that have the most impact on oil recovery using the concept of experimental design and response surface maps, (2) UTCHEM reservoir simulator to perform the numerical simulations, and (3) an economic model that automatically imports the simulation production data to evaluate the profitability of a particular design. Such a reservoir simulation framework is not currently available to the oil industry. The objectives of Task 1 are to develop three primary modules representing reservoir, chemical, and well data. The modules will be interfaced with an already available experimental design model. The objective of the Task 2 is to incorporate UTCHEM reservoir simulator and the modules with the strategic variables and developing the response surface maps to identify the significant variables from each module. The objective of the Task 3 is to develop the economic model designed specifically for the chemical processes targeted in this proposal and interface the economic model with UTCHEM production output. Task 4 is on the validation of the framework and performing simulations of oil reservoirs to screen, design and optimize the chemical processes.
Date: August 31, 2006
Creator: Delshad, Mojdeh; Pope, Gary A. & Sepehrnoori, Kamy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

History Matching in Parallel Computational Environments

Description: A novel methodology for delineating multiple reservoir domains for the purpose of history matching in a distributed computing environment has been proposed. A fully probabilistic approach to perturb permeability within the delineated zones is implemented. The combination of robust schemes for identifying reservoir zones and distributed computing significantly increase the accuracy and efficiency of the probabilistic approach. The information pertaining to the permeability variations in the reservoir that is contained in dynamic data is calibrated in terms of a deformation parameter rD. This information is merged with the prior geologic information in order to generate permeability models consistent with the observed dynamic data as well as the prior geology. The relationship between dynamic response data and reservoir attributes may vary in different regions of the reservoir due to spatial variations in reservoir attributes, well configuration, flow constrains etc. The probabilistic approach then has to account for multiple r{sub D} values in different regions of the reservoir. In order to delineate reservoir domains that can be characterized with different r{sub D} parameters, principal component analysis (PCA) of the Hessian matrix has been done. The Hessian matrix summarizes the sensitivity of the objective function at a given step of the history matching to model parameters. It also measures the interaction of the parameters in affecting the objective function. The basic premise of PC analysis is to isolate the most sensitive and least correlated regions. The eigenvectors obtained during the PCA are suitably scaled and appropriate grid block volume cut-offs are defined such that the resultant domains are neither too large (which increases interactions between domains) nor too small (implying ineffective history matching). The delineation of domains requires calculation of Hessian, which could be computationally costly and as well as restricts the current approach to some specific simulators. Therefore a robust technique to ...
Date: August 31, 2006
Creator: Bryant, Steven; Srinivasan, Sanjay; Barrera, Alvaro; Kim, Yonghwee & Yadav, Sharad
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

History Matching in Parallel Computational Environments

Description: In the probabilistic approach for history matching, the information from the dynamic data is merged with the prior geologic information in order to generate permeability models consistent with the observed dynamic data as well as the prior geology. The relationship between dynamic response data and reservoir attributes may vary in different regions of the reservoir due to spatial variations in reservoir attributes, fluid properties, well configuration, flow constrains on wells etc. This implies probabilistic approach should then update different regions of the reservoir in different ways. This necessitates delineation of multiple reservoir domains in order to increase the accuracy of the approach. The research focuses on a probabilistic approach to integrate dynamic data that ensures consistency between reservoir models developed from one stage to the next. The algorithm relies on efficient parameterization of the dynamic data integration problem and permits rapid assessment of the updated reservoir model at each stage. The report also outlines various domain decomposition schemes from the perspective of increasing the accuracy of probabilistic approach of history matching. Research progress in three important areas of the project are discussed: {lg_bullet}Validation and testing the probabilistic approach to incorporating production data in reservoir models. {lg_bullet}Development of a robust scheme for identifying reservoir regions that will result in a more robust parameterization of the history matching process. {lg_bullet}Testing commercial simulators for parallel capability and development of a parallel algorithm for history matching.
Date: August 31, 2004
Creator: Bryant, Steven; Srinivasan, Sanjay; Barrera, Alvaro & Yadav, Sharad
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Operation of a Public Geologic Core and Sample Repository in Houstion, Texas

Description: The Bureau of Economic Geology's Houston Research Center (HRC) is well established as a premier regional research center for geologic research serving not only Houston, but geoscientists from around Texas, the U. S., and even the world. As reported in the FY05 and FY06 technical progress reports to the DOE, the HRC provides a state-of-the-art core viewing facility, two fully equipped conference rooms, and a comprehensive technical library, all available for public use. In addition, the HRC currently now houses over 725,000 boxes of rock material (as of January 2008), and has space to hold approximately 300,000 more boxes. Use of the facility has remained strong; the number of patrons averaged over 100 per month from June 1, 2006 to October 2007, and 90,000 boxes of core were donated to, and received by, the HRC during this time. Usage is a combination of individuals describing core, groups of geoscientists holding seminars and workshops, and various industry and government-funded groups holding short courses, workshops, and seminars. These numbers are in addition to the numerous daily requests from patrons desiring to have rock material shipped offsite to their own offices. The BEG/HRC secured several substantial donations of rock materials and cash totaling approximately $2.2 million during the 2005-2006 operating period. All of these funds went directly into an endowment that UT is building in order to operate the HRC primarily off a portion of the interest generated by the fund. Specific details regarding the funds in the endowment are addressed in a table later in this report. Outreach during 2005 and 2006 included many technical presentations and several publications on the HRC. Several field trips to the facility were held for geoscience professionals and grade school students alike. Goals for the upcoming year involve securing a major donation of rock material and ...
Date: July 31, 2007
Creator: Tinker, Scott & DeJarnett, Beverly
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final Technical Report

Description: The long term goal of this laboratory is to elucidate a detailed molecular description of the process of initiation of protein synthesis and its regulation. The specific goals of the project were: (1) development of an in vivo [{sup 32}P]- and/or [{sup 35}S]-labeling system for proteins using Arabidopsis suspension cells; (2) develop an in vitro protein synthesis assay from Arabidopsis suspension cells; (3) develop an assay for locating Arabidopsis kinases that phosphorylate the initiation factors; and (4) begin to identify Arabidopsis kinases that are involved in phosphorylation of the initiation factors.
Date: June 28, 2005
Creator: Browning, Karen S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Mixed Wettablility at Different Scales and Its Impact on Oil Recovery Efficiency

Description: The objectives of the this research project were to: (1) Quantify the pore scale mechanisms that determine the wettability state of a reservoir; (2) Study the effect of crude oil, brine and mineral compositions in the establishment of mixed wet states; (3) Clarify the effect of mixed-wettability on oil displacement efficiency in waterfloods; and (4) Develop a new tracer technique to measure wettability, fluid distributions, residual saturations and relative permeabilities.
Date: August 31, 2003
Creator: Sharma, Mukul M. & Hirasaki, George J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of Turbiditic Oil Reservoirs Based on Geophysical Models of their Formation

Description: Models are developed and solved to describe the flow of and deposition from low and high concentration turbidity currents. The shallow water equations are amended to include particle transport to describe the low concentration turbidity currents. The suspension balance model is used to describe the high concentration turbidity currents. Numerical simulations are developed to solve the highly non-linear, free boundary problems associated with these models. Simpler, algebraic scaling relationships are also developed for these models. The models are successfully validated against field observations of turbidites. With these models, one can take seismic information on the shape of the turbiditic deposit and estimate the particle size, which can be used to determine the porosity and permeability.
Date: January 15, 2006
Creator: Bonnecaze, Roger
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department