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THE PENA BLANCA NATURAL ANALOGUE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT MODEL

Description: The Nopal I uranium mine in the Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico serves as a natural analogue to the Yucca Mountain repository. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model simulates the mobilization and transport of radionuclides that are released from the mine and transported to the saturated zone. The Pena Blanca Natural Analogue Performance Assessment Model uses probabilistic simulations of hydrogeologic processes that are analogous to the processes that occur at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I uranium deposit lies in fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs that overlie carbonate rocks, a setting analogous to the geologic formations at the Yucca Mountain site. The Nopal I mine site has the following analogous characteristics as compared to the Yucca Mountain repository site: (1) Analogous source--UO{sub 2} uranium ore deposit = spent nuclear fuel in the repository; (2) Analogous geology--(i.e. fractured, welded, and altered rhyolitic ash-flow tuffs); (3) Analogous climate--Semiarid to arid; (4) Analogous setting--Volcanic tuffs overlie carbonate rocks; and (5) Analogous geochemistry--Oxidizing conditions Analogous hydrogeology: The ore deposit lies in the unsaturated zone above the water table.
Date: April 16, 2006
Creator: Saulnier, G. & Statham, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Perrhenate and Pertechnetate Behavior on Iron and Sulfur-Bearing Compounds.

Description: Investigations on the behavior of the radioactive element technetium frequently use a stable isotope of rhenium as an analogue. This is justified by citing the elements similar radii and major oxidation states of +7 and +4. However, at least one study [1] has shown this analogy to be imperfect. Therefore, one goal of our study is to compare the adsorption behavior of perrhenate and pertechnetate (the major forms of Re and Tc in natural waters) on a number of different mineral surfaces. Quantum mechanical calculations were performed on the adsorption of these two anions on a series of iron oxides and sulfides. With these calculations, we gain insight into any differences between the anions adsorption behavior, including geometry, adsorption energies, and electronic structure such as density of states and orbital shapes and energies at the adsorption site. Differences between interactions on terraces and step edges, the effects of co-adsorbates such as Na{sup +} or H{sup +}, and possible reduction mechanisms are also explored. The influence of water was calculated using homogeneous dielectric fluids and explicit water molecules. As a complement to the calculations, batch sorption tests are in progress involving ReO{sub 4}{sup -}/TcO{sub 4}{sup -} solution in contact with Fe metal, 10% Fe-doped hydroxyapatite, goethite, hematite, magnetite, pyrite, galena, and sphalerite.
Date: September 15, 2006
Creator: Anderson, B. E.; Becker, U.; Helean, K. B. & Ewing, R. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PERMANENT ROCKBOLT AND TEMPORARY CHANNEL INTERACTION ANALYSIS

Description: The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the interaction of a quality assurance (QA) classified item (QA-1 and QA-5) with an item of temporary function (QA: NONE), in accordance with Requirement 8 of the Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) (Reference Section 5.1). This interaction analysis will be done by determining the forces on ''Williams'' rockbolts transferred from temporary function channels under maximum capacity loads, and ensuring that these loads do not compromise the critical characteristics of these rockbolts.
Date: March 14, 1995
Creator: Keifer, J. & Taylor, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pretest Caluculations of Temperature Changes for Field Thermal Conductivity Tests

Description: A large volume fraction of the potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain may reside in the Tptpll (Tertiary, Paintbrush Group, Topopah Spring Tuff, crystal poor, lower lithophysal) lithostratigraphic unit. This unit is characterized by voids, or lithophysae, which range in size from centimeters to meters. A series of thermal conductivity field tests are planned in the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. The objective of the pretest calculation described in this document is to predict changes in temperatures in the surrounding rock for these tests for a given heater power and a set of thermal transport properties. The calculation can be extended, as described in this document, to obtain thermal conductivity, thermal capacitance (density x heat capacity, J {center_dot} m{sup -3} {center_dot} K{sup -1}), and thermal diffusivity from the field data. The work has been conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Testing and Monitoring'' (BSC 2001). One of the outcomes of this analysis is to determine the initial output of the heater. This heater output must be sufficiently high that it will provide results in a reasonably short period of time (within several weeks or a month) and be sufficiently high that the heat increase is detectable by the instruments employed in the test. The test will be conducted in stages and heater output will be step increased as the test progresses. If the initial temperature is set too high, the experiment will not have as many steps and thus fewer thermal conductivity data points will result.
Date: July 17, 2002
Creator: Brodsky, N.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pretest Predictions for Ventilation Tests

Description: The objective of this calculation is to predict the temperatures of the ventilating air, waste package surface, concrete pipe walls, and insulation that will be developed during the ventilation tests involving various test conditions. The results will be used as input to the following three areas: (1) Decisions regarding testing set-up and performance. (2) Assessing how best to scale the test phenomena measured. (3) Validating numerical approach for modeling continuous ventilation. The scope of the calculation is to identify the physical mechanisms and parameters related to thermal response in the ventilation tests, and develop and describe numerical methods that can be used to calculate the effects of continuous ventilation. Sensitivity studies to assess the impact of variation of linear power densities (linear heat loads) and ventilation air flow rates are included. The calculation is limited to thermal effect only.
Date: January 17, 2007
Creator: Sun, Y.; Yang, H. & Kalia, H.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pure Phase Solubility Limits: LANL

Description: The natural and engineered system at Yucca Mountain (YM) defines the site-specific conditions under which one must determine to what extent the engineered and the natural geochemical barriers will prevent the release of radioactive material from the repository. Most important mechanisms for retention or enhancement of radionuclide transport include precipitation or co-precipitation of radionuclide-bearing solid phases (solubility limits), complexation in solution, sorption onto surfaces, colloid formation, and diffusion. There may be many scenarios that could affect the near-field environment, creating chemical conditions more aggressive than the conditions presented by the unperturbed system (such as pH changes beyond the range of 6 to 9 or significant changes in the ionic strength of infiltrated waters). For an extended period of time, the near-field water composition may be quite different and more extreme in pH, ionic strength, and CO{sub 2} partial pressure (or carbonate concentration) than waters at some distance from the repository. Reducing conditions, high pH (up to 11), and low carbonate concentration may be present in the near-field after reaction of infiltrating groundwater with engineered barrier systems, such as cementitious materials. In the far-field, conditions are controlled by the rock-mass buffer providing a near-neutral, oxidizing, low-ionic-strength environment that controls radionuclide solubility limits and sorption capacities. There is the need for characterization of variable chemical conditions that affect solubility, speciation, and sorption reactions. Modeling of the groundwater chemistry is required and leads to an understanding of solubility and speciation of the important radionuclides. Because experimental studies cannot be performed under the numerous potential chemical conditions, solubility limitations must rely on geochemical modeling of the radionuclide's chemistry. Fundamental thermodynamic properties, such as solubility products, complex stability constants, and redox potentials for radionuclides in different oxidation states, form the underlying database to be used for those calculations. The potentially low solubilities of many radionuclides ...
Date: January 26, 2001
Creator: Stockman, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

Description: This analysis is one of the technical reports that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain, Nevada (ERMYN), referred to in this report as the biosphere model. ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes in detail the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and its input parameters. This report documents development of input parameters for the biosphere model that are related to atmospheric mass loading and supports the use of the model to develop biosphere dose conversion factors (BDCFs). The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for a Yucca Mountain repository. ''Inhalation Exposure Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'' is one of five reports that develop input parameters for the biosphere model. A graphical representation of the documentation hierarchy for the biosphere model is presented in Figure 1-1 (based on BSC 2006 [DIRS 176938]). This figure shows the interrelationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling and how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling. This analysis report defines and justifies values of atmospheric mass loading for the biosphere model. Mass loading is the total mass concentration of resuspended particles (e.g., dust, ash) in a volume of air. Mass loading values are used in the air submodel of the biosphere model to calculate concentrations of radionuclides in air inhaled by a receptor and concentrations in air surrounding crops. Concentrations in air to which the receptor is exposed are then used in the inhalation submodel to calculate the dose contribution to the receptor from inhalation of contaminated airborne particles. Concentrations in air surrounding plants are used in the plant submodel to calculate the concentrations of radionuclides in foodstuffs contributed from uptake by foliar interception. This report is concerned primarily with the ...
Date: June 5, 2006
Creator: Wasiolek, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Influence of Hydrologic Heterogencity on Thermal-Hydrologic Behavior in Emplacement Drifts

Description: Fracture networks have been characterized as highly permeable continuum within the porous rock matrix in thermal-hydrologic models used to support performance assessments of the proposed nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Uncertainty and spatial variability of the fracture permeability are important considerations for understanding thermal-hydrologic behavior within the host rock surrounding an emplacement drift. In this paper, we conducted numerical experiments with a number of realizations of intrinsic fracture permeability and examine thermal conditions around an emplacement drift. Peak temperature and boiling duration on the drift wall are used as indices to quantify, the influence of fracture permeability. The variability of peak temperature and boiling duration resulting from small-scale fracture-permeability heterogeneity is compared with the variability resulting from variability of host-rock thermal conductivity and infiltration flux. An examination of rock dryout and condensate drainage shows that small-scale heterogeneity in fracture permeability results in a relatively small range in dryout volume and does not prevent the shedding of condensate through the pillar-separating emplacement drifts.
Date: March 28, 2006
Creator: Sun, Y.; Buscheck, T.A. & Hao, Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Initiation and Persistence of Preferential Flow in Fractured Rocks

Description: To better understand preferential flow in fractured rock, we carried out an in situ field experiment in the underground Exploratory Studies Facility in the fractured Topopah Spring tuff at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Ponded water (with a {approx}0.04 m head) was released onto a 3 x 4 m{sup 2} infiltration plot (divided into 12 square subplots) over a period of {approx}800 days. As water was released, spatial and temporal variability in infiltration rates was continuously monitored. In addition, changes in moisture content were monitored along horizontal boreholes located in the formation {approx} 19-22 m below. This experiment revealed peculiar infiltration patterns. In particular, we observed that in some of the subplots, the infiltration rate abruptly increased a few weeks into the infiltration tests before gradually decreasing, while in others a relatively low infiltration rate persisted for the duration of the experiment. Distinct flow zones, varying in flow velocity, wetted cross-sectional area, and extent of lateral movement, intercepted the monitoring boreholes. There was also evidence of water being diverted above the ceiling of a cavity in the immediate vicinity of the monitoring boreholes. Observations from this field experiment suggest that isolated conduits, each encompassing a large number of fractures, develop within the fractured rock formation to form preferential flow paths that persist if there is a continuous supply of water. An overriding conclusion is that field investigations at spatial scales of tens of meters provide data critical to the fundamental understanding of preferential flow in fractured rock.
Date: August 31, 2006
Creator: Salve, R.; Ghezzehei, T.A. & Jones, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THE INFLUENCE OF REPOSITORY THERMAL LOAD ON MULTIPHASE FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE OF YUCCA MOUNTAIN

Description: This paper investigates the impact of proposed repository thermal-loading on mountain-scale flow and heat transfer in the unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this context, a model has been developed to study the coupled thermal-hydrological (TH) processes at the scale of the entire Yucca Mountain. This mountain-scale TH model implements the current geological framework and hydrogeological conceptual models, and incorporates the latest rock thermal and hydrological properties. The TH model consists of a two-dimensional north-south vertical cross section across the entire unsaturated zone model domain and uses refined meshes near and around the proposed repository block, based on the current repository design, drift layout, thermal loading scenario, and estimated current and future climatic conditions. The model simulations provide insights into thermally affected liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and elevated water and rock temperature, which in turn allow modelers to predict the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes, and drainage between drifts.
Date: April 16, 2006
Creator: Yu-Shu Wu, Sumit Mukhopadhyay, Keni Zhang, and G. S. Bodvarsson
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Isotopic Generation and Confirmation of the PWR Application Model

Description: The objective of this calculation is to establish an isotopic database to represent commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) from pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in criticality analyses performed for the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Confirmation of the conservatism with respect to criticality in the isotopic concentration values represented by this isotopic database is performed as described in Section 3.5.3.1.2 of the ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2000). The isotopic database consists of the set of 14 actinides and 15 fission products presented in Section 3.5.2.1.1 of YMP 2000 for use in CSNF burnup credit. This set of 29 isotopes is referred to as the principal isotopes. The oxygen isotope from the UO{sub 2} fuel is also included in the database. The isotopic database covers enrichments of {sup 235}U ranging from 1.5 to 5.5 weight percent (wt%) and burnups ranging from approximately zero to 75 GWd per metric ton of uranium (mtU). The choice of fuel assembly and operating history values used in generating the isotopic database are provided is Section 5. Tables of isotopic concentrations for the 29 principal isotopes (plus oxygen) as a function of enrichment and burnup are provided in Section 6.1. Results of the confirmation of the conservatism with respect to criticality in the isotopic concentration values are provided in Section 6.2.
Date: November 10, 2003
Creator: Wimmer, L.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HLW Canister and Can-In-Canister Drop Calculation

Description: The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the standard high-level waste (HLW) canister and the HLW canister containing the cans of immobilized plutonium (''can-in-canister'' throughout this document) to the drop event during the handling operation. The objective of the calculation is to provide the structure parameter information to support the canister design and the waste handling facility design. Finite element solution is performed using the commercially available ANSYS Version (V) 5.4 finite element code. Two-dimensional (2-D) axisymmetric and three-dimensional (3-D) finite element representations for the standard HLW canister and the can-in-canister are developed and analyzed using the dynamic solver.
Date: September 15, 1999
Creator: Marr, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HORIZONTAL LIFTING OF 5 DHLW/DOE LONG, 12-PWR LONG AND 24-BWR WASTE PACKAGES

Description: The objective of this calculation was to determine the structural response of a 12-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Long, a 24-Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and a 5-Defense High Level Waste/Department of Energy (DHLW/DOE)--Long spent nuclear fuel waste packages lifted in a horizontal position. The scope of this calculation was limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of maximum stress intensities in the trunnion collar sleeves. In addition, the maximum stress intensities in the inner and outer shells of the waste packages were presented for illustrative purposes. The information provided by the sketches (Attachments I, II and III) is that of the potential design of the types of waste packages considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for these designs only. This calculation is associated with the waste package design and was performed by the Waste Package Design Section in accordance with the ''Technical work plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 7). AP-3.12Q, Calculations (Ref. 13), was used to perform the calculation and develop the document.
Date: May 17, 2001
Creator: Brosse, V. de la
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HORIZONTAL DROP OF THE NAVAL SNF LONG WASTE PACKAGE ON UNYIELDING SURFACE

Description: The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of a Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Long Waste Package (WP) subjected to a 2.4-m horizontal drop on an unyielding surface (US). The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of maximum stress intensities. This calculation is associated with the waste package design and was performed by the Waste Package Design section in accordance with the development plan for ''Horizontal Drop of the Naval SNF Long Waste Package on Unyielding Surface''.
Date: May 23, 2000
Creator: Schmitt, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Horizontal Drop of 21- PWR Waste Package

Description: The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the waste package (WP) dropped horizontally from a specified height. The WP used for that purpose is the 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) WP. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensities. The information provided by the sketches (Attachment I) is that of the potential design of the type of WP considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for that design only. This calculation is associated with the WP design and was performed by the Waste Package Design group in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 16). AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'' (Ref. 11) is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The sketches attached to this calculation provide the potential dimensions and materials for the 21-PWR WP design.
Date: April 26, 2001
Creator: Scheider, A.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Horizontal Drop of 21- PWR Waste Package

Description: The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the waste package (WP) dropped horizontally from a specified height. The WP used for that purpose is the 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) WP. The scope of this document is limited to reporting the calculation results in-terms of stress intensities. This calculation is associated with the WP design and was performed by the Waste Package Design group in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 16). AP-3.12Q, ''Calculations'' (Ref. 1 1) is used to perform the calculation and develop the document. The sketches attached to this calculation provide the potential dimensions and materials for the 21-PWR WP design.
Date: January 31, 2007
Creator: Scheider, A.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HOW DUAL-SCALE DIFFUSIVE PROPERTY HETEROGENEITY AFFECTS EFFECTIVE MATRIX DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT IN FRACTURED ROCK

Description: Matrix diffusion can significantly retard solute transport in fractured formations. Understanding matrix diffusion is crucial for predicting the arrival time, peak concentration, and tail of a contaminant breakthrough curve. Previous studies show that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient may be scale dependent. This study examines how heterogeneities of diffusion properties affect the effective matrix diffusion coefficient. Two types of heterogeneity in a channelized flow system are considered in the study: (1) interchannel heterogeneity, and (2) intrachannel heterogeneity. The objectives of this study are (1) to examine if it is appropriate to use a single, effective matrix diffusion coefficient in a standard solution model to predict breakthrough curves (BTC) in a fractured formation, (2) if so, how this effective value is related to the degree of the matrix diffusion coefficient variability; and (3) to examine if the observed scale dependence of the effective matrix-diffusion coefficient is caused by heterogeneity in diffusion properties. The results show that the use of a single effective matrix diffusion coefficient is appropriate only if the inter- and intrachannel variability of diffusion properties is small. The scale dependence of the effective matrix diffusion coefficient is not caused by either type of the studied heterogeneity.
Date: September 7, 2005
Creator: Zhang, Y.; Liu, H.; Zhou, Q. & Finsterle, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THE IMPACT OF NATURAL CONVECTION ON NEAR-FIELD TH PROCESSES IN THE FRACTURED ROCK AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN

Description: The heat output of the radioactive waste proposed to be emplaced at Yucca Mountain will strongly affect the thermal-hydrological (TH) conditions in and near the geologic repository for thousands of years. Recent computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has demonstrated that the emplacement tunnels (drifts) will act as important conduits for gas flows driven by natural convection. As a result, vapor generated from boiling/evaporation of formation water near elevated-temperature sections of the drifts may effectively be transported to cooler end sections (where no waste is emplaced), would condense there, and subsequently drain into underlying rock units. To study these processes, we have developed a new simulation method that couples existing tools for simulating TH conditions in the fractured formation with modules that approximate natural convection in heated emplacement drifts. The new method is applied to evaluate the future TH conditions at Yucca Mountain in a three-dimensional model domain comprising a representative emplacement drift and the surrounding fractured rock.
Date: April 16, 2006
Creator: Tsang, Yvonne
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department