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Use of EIChroM`s TRU resin in the determination of americium, plutonium and uranium in air filter and water samples

Description: TRU Resin, an extraction chromatographic material (octyl (phenyl)-N,Ndiisobutylcarbamoyl-methylphosphene oxide (CMPO) dissolved in tributyl phosphate (TBP)) manufactured by EIChroM Industries, was tested for its actinide sorption and desorption characteristics. A study was initiated to demonstrate the effectiveness of extracting plutonium, americium and uranium from water and air filter samples from the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s Quality Assessment Program (QAP), and the effectiveness of subsequent desorption of one chemical species at a time in order to prepare each of them for a spectrometry. Crossover of plutonium into the americium fraction with the TRU Resin was observed and could not be eliminated while using TRU Resin only. However, prior extraction of plutonium using an anion exchange resin can overcome this problem. A method for the determination of americium is proposed which combines the extraction of plutonium onto Bio-Rad AG 1-X8 anion exchange resin with the extraction of americium using the TRU Resin. This method was tested on three triplicate sets of QAP air filters and two triplicate sets of QAP water samples. The recoveries ranged from 70 to 90 percent, and the results were identical to those obtained by the existing methods. The time required to perform the analysis for americium was shortened from 5 weeks to 1 week.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Berne, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Worldwide deposition of strontium-90 through 1990

Description: Strontium-90 results from the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s (EML) Global Fallout Program (GFP) are presented for the years 1987 through 1990. Quarterly {sup 90}Sr deposition results for the 66 sampling locations of EML`s GFP were generally low, indicating that there was no significant release of fission products into the atmosphere during this period. The global {sup 90}Sr deposition during these 4 years was lower than it has been for any similar period since this program began in 1958. Since there was no major atmospheric source of {sup 90}Sr during this period, the global cumulative deposit of {sup 90}Sr continued to decrease by radioactive decay to a 27 year low of 311.4 Pbq.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Monetti, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

Description: This report presents the results from the analysis of the 43rd set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLIII) that were received on or before December 1, 1995. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 2 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Sanderson, C.G. & Greenlaw, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Measurements Laboratory 1994 annual report

Description: This report summarizes the activities of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) for the calendar year 1994 and it serves as an annual report to the Director of the Office of Energy Research (ER), the Associate Director and staff of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the manager and staff of the Chicago Field Office, and the authors colleagues. Emphasized are the progress and accomplishments of the year, rather than future plans or expectations. The technical summaries are grouped according to the following seven general program areas: environmental radiation and radioactivity; radiation transport and dosimetry; environmental radon, thoron, and related aerosols; atmospheric and surface pollutant studies related to global climate change; atmospheric chemistry; metrology, consultation, and emergency response; environmental management. EML`s mission is to address important scientific questions concerning human health and environmental impacts. Through its multidisciplinary staff, EML conducts experimental and theoretical research on radioactive and other energy-related pollutants, and provides DOE and other federal agencies with the in-house capability to respond effectively and efficiently with regard to quality assurance activities, environmental issues and related national security issues.
Date: August 1, 1995
Creator: Chieco, N.A.; Krey, P.W. & Beck, H.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calibration of a liquid scintillation counter for alpha, beta and Cerenkov counting

Description: Calibration data are presented for 25 radionuclides that were individually measured in a Packard Tri-Carb 2250CA liquid scintillation (LS) counter by both conventional and Cerenkov detection techniques. The relationships and regression data between the quench indicating parameters and the LS counting efficiencies were determined using microliter amounts of tracer added to low {sup 40}K borosilicate glass vials containing 15 mL of Insta-Gel XF scintillation cocktail. Using {sup 40}K, the detection efficiencies were linear over a three order of magnitude range (10 - 10,000 mBq) in beta activity for both LS and Cerenkov counting. The Cerenkov counting efficiency (CCE) increased linearly (42% per MeV) from 0.30 to 2.0 MeV, whereas the LS efficiency was >90% for betas with energy in excess of 0.30 MeV. The CCE was 20 - 50% less than the LS counting efficiency for beta particles with maximum energies in excess of 1 MeV. Based on replicate background measurements, the lower limit of detection (LLD) for a 1-h count at the 95% confidence level, using water as a solvent, was 0.024 counts sec-{sup -1} and 0.028 counts sec-1 for plastic and glass vials, respectively. The LLD for a 1-h-count ranged from 46 to 56 mBq (2.8 - 3.4 dpm) for both Cerenkov and conventional LS counting. This assumes: (1) a 100% counting efficiency, (2) a 50% yield of the nuclide of interest, (3) a 1-h measurement time using low background plastic vials, and (4) a 0-50 keV region of interest. The LLD is reduced an order of magnitude when the yield recovery exceeds 90% and a lower background region is used (i.e., 100 - 500 keV alpha region of interest). Examples and applications of both Cerenkov and LS counting techniques are given in the text and appendices.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Scarpitta, S.C. & Fisenne, I.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EML Surface Air Sampling Program, 1990--1993 data

Description: Measurements of the concentrations of specific atmospheric radionuclides in air filter samples collected for the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s Surface Air Sampling Program (SASP) during 1990--1993, with the exception of April 1993, indicate that anthropogenic radionuclides, in both hemispheres, were at or below the lower limits of detection for the sampling and analytical techniques that were used to collect and measure them. The occasional detection of {sup 137}Cs in some air filter samples may have resulted from resuspension of previously deposited debris. Following the April 6, 1993 accident and release of radionuclides into the atmosphere at a reprocessing plant in the Tomsk-7 military nuclear complex located 16 km north of the Siberian city of Tomsk, Russia, weekly air filter samples from Barrow, Alaska; Thule, Greenland and Moosonee, Canada were selected for special analyses. The naturally occurring radioisotopes that the authors measure, {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb, continue to be detected in most air filter samples. Variations in the annual mean concentrations of {sup 7}Be at many of the sites appear to result primarily from changes in the atmospheric production rate of this cosmogenic radionuclide. Short-term variations in the concentrations of {sup 7}Be and {sup 210}Pb continued to be observed at many sites at which weekly air filter samples were analyzed. The monthly gross gamma-ray activity and the monthly mean surface air concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 144}Ce, and {sup 210}Pb measured at sampling sites in SASP during 1990--1993 are presented. The weekly mean surface air concentrations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 144}Ce, and {sup 210}Pb for samples collected during 1990--1993 are given for 17 sites.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Larsen, R.J.; Sanderson, C.G. & Kada, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Selection and use of equipment for the sampling of liquids

Description: The selection of sampling equipment for the collection of liquid waste is based on factors such as the viscosity of the sample matrix, matrix compatibility with the construction materials of the sampling device, and the physical location of the sampling point. This report provides information relating to sampling from such matrices as ground and surface waters, vadose zones, containerized liquids, lagoons, and seeps. It is intended to be a reference tool for personnel involved with the collection of liquid samples throughout the Department of Energy complex. This report provides a general overview of many liquid sampling devices used and for each device it provides a short narrative regarding applicability, an outline of the basic procedure for use, a list of advantages and disadvantages, and an illustration.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Johnson, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Short- and long-lived radionuclide particle size measurements in a uranium mine

Description: The radon-222 progeny and long-lived radionuclide measurements were done in a wet underground uranium mine in Saskatchewan, Canada, on Nov. 8-12, 1995. Radon-222 in the mine varied from 2 kBq/m{sup 3} at 90 m below surface to 12 kBq/m{sup 3} in the mining areas, 240 m below surface. Radon-222 progeny activity and potential alpha energy concentration appear affected by the airborne particle number concentration and size distribution. Particle number was up to 200x10{sup 3}/cm{sup 3}. Only an accumulation mode (30-1000 nm) and some bimodal size distributions in this accumulation size range were significant. Diesel particles and combustion particles from burning propane caused a major modal diameter shift to a smaller size range (50-85 nm) compared with previous values (100-200 nm). The high particle number reduced the unattached progeny (0.5-2 nm) to >5%. The nuclei mode (2-30 nm) in this test was nonexistent, and the coarse mode (>1000 nm), except from the drilling areas and on the stopes, was mostly not measurable. Airborne particle total mass and long- lived radionuclide alpha activity concentrations were very low (80- 100 {mu}g/m{sup 3} and 4-5 mBq/m{sup 3}) owing to high ventilation rates. Mass-weighted size distributions were trimodal, with the major mode at the accumulation size region, which accounts for 45-50% of the mass. The coarse model contains the the least mass, about 20%. The size spectra from gross alpha activities were bimodal with major mode in the coarse region (>1000 nm) and a minor accumulation mode in the 50-900 nm size range. These size spectra were different from the {sup 222}Rn progeny that showed a single accumulation mode in the 50- 85 nm size region. The accumulation mode in the long-lived radionuclide size spectrum was not found in previous studies in other uranium mines.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Tu, Keng-Wu; Fisenne, I.M. & Hutter, A.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Measurements Laboratory, annual report 1995

Description: This report summarizes the activities of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) for the calendar year 1995 and serves as an annual report to the Director of the Office of Energy Research (ER), the Associate Director and staff of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the Manager and staff of the Chicago Operations Office, and our colleagues. Emphasized are the progress and accomplishments of the year, rather than future plans or expectations. The technical summaries are grouped according to the following seven research program areas: (1) Environmental Radiation and Radioactivity; (2) Radiation Transport and Dosimetry; (3) Environmental Radon, Thoron, and Related Aerosols; (4) Atmospheric and Surface Pollutant Studies Related to Global Climate Change; (5) Atmospheric Chemistry; and (6) Metrology, Consultation, and Emergency Response Environmental Management The mission of EML is to address important scientific questions concerning human health and environmental impacts. Through its multidisciplinary staff, EML conducts experimental and theoretical research on radioactive and other energy-related pollutants and provides DOE and other federal agencies with the in-house capability to respond effectively and efficiently with regard to quality assurance activities, environmental issues, and related national security issues.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Krey, P.W. & Heit, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Gamma Spectrometry Data Validation Program

Description: This report represents the results of analyses received on or before August 15, 1996 for the first annual Gamma Spectrometry Data Validation Program (May 1996) designed to assess the capability of DOE laboratories and DOE contractors in performing routine gamma spectra analyses. Data reduction of gamma spectra are normally performed with computer codes supplied by commercial manufacturers or are developed in house. Earlier evaluations of commercial codes gave spurious results for complex spectrum. A calibration spectrum, a background spectrum and three sample spectra of increasing complexity were included for each format. The calibration spectrum contained nuclides covering the energy range from 59.5 keV to 1836 keV. The first two samples contained fallout nuclides with halflives of over 30 days. Naturally occurring nuclides were also present. The third sample contained both short and long lived fission product nuclides. The participants were asked to report values and uncertainties as Becquerel per sample with no decay correction. Sixteen software packages were evaluated. In general, the results do not appear to be dependent on the software used. Based on the control limits established for the Program for the three sample spectra, 62%, 63% and 53%, respectively, of the reported results were evaluated as acceptable.
Date: November 1, 1996
Creator: Decker, K.; Sanderson, C.G. & Greenlaw, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

International intercalibration and intercomparison measurements of radon progeny particle size distribution

Description: Because there is no standard method for {sup 222}Rn progeny size measurements, verifying the performance of various measurement techniques is important. This report describes results of an international intercomparison and calibration of {sup 222}Rn progeny size measurements involving low pressure impactors (MOUDI and Berner) and diffusion battery systems, as well as both alpha- and gamma- counting methods. The intercomparison was at EML on June 12-15, 1995. 5 different particle sizes (80, 90, 165, 395, 1200 nm) of near monodisperse condensation Carbauba wax aerosol and 2 bimodal size spectra (160 and 365 nm, and 70 and 400 nm) were used. 20 tests were completed, covering both low and high concentrations of {sup 222}Rn and test aerosols. For the single-mode test aerosol, the measurements agreed within the size range. Best agreement was found between the two low pressure impactors. Some differences between the impactor and diffusion battery methods were observed in the specific peak locations and the resultant geometric mean diameters. For the two bimodal size distribution aerosols, the MOUDI measurements showed two modes, while the other 3 devices showed a single mode size distribution.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Tu, Keng-Wu
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The procedures manual of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory. Volume 2, 28. edition

Description: This report contains environmental sampling and analytical chemistry procedures that are performed by the Environmental Measurements Laboratory. The purpose of environmental sampling and analysis is to obtain data that describe a particular site at a specific point in time from which an evaluation can be made as a basis for possible action.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Chieco, N.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The procedures manual of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory. Volume 1, 28. edition

Description: This manual covers procedures and technology currently in use at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory. An attempt is made to be sure that all work carried out will be of the highest quality. Attention is focused on the following areas: quality assurance; sampling; radiation measurements; analytical chemistry; radionuclide data; special facilities; and specifications.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Chieco, N.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Intercomparison of active, passive and continuous instruments for radon and radon progeny measurements in the EML chamber and test facility

Description: Results are presented from the Fifth Intercomparison of Active, Passive and Continuous Instruments for Radon and Radon Progeny Measurements conducted in the EML radon exposure and test facility in May 1996. In total, thirty-four government, private and academic facilities participated in the exercise with over 170 passive and electronic devices exposed in the EML test chamber. During the first week of the exercise, passive and continuous measuring devices were exposed (usually in quadruplicate) to about 1,280 Bq m{sup {minus}3} {sup 222}Rn for 1--7 days. Radon progeny measurements were made during the second week of the exercise. The results indicate that all of the tested devices that measure radon gas performed well and fulfill their intended purpose. The grand mean (GM) ratio of the participants` reported values to the EML values, for all four radon device categories, was 0.99 {plus_minus} 0.08. Eighty-five percent of all the radon measuring devices that were exposed in the EML radon test chamber were within {plus_minus}1 standard deviation (SD) of the EML reference values. For the most part, radon progeny measurements were also quite good as compared to the EML values. The GM ratio for the 10 continuous PAEC instruments was 0.90 {plus_minus} 0.12 with 75% of the devices within 1 SD of the EML reference values. Most of the continuous and integrating electronic instruments used for measuring the PAEC underestimated the EML values by about 10--15% probably because the concentration of particles onto which the radon progeny were attached was low (1,200--3,800 particles cm{sup {minus}3}). The equilibrium factor at that particle concentration level was 0.10--0.22.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Scarpitta, S.C.; Tu, K.W.; Fisenne, I.M.; Cavallo, A. & Perry, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

Description: This report presents the results from the analysis of the 42st set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLII) that were received on or before June 1, 1995. This Quality Assessment Program (QAP) is designed to test the quality of the environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by its contractors. Since 1976, real or synthetic environmental samples that have been prepared and thoroughly analyzed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) have been distributed at first quarterly and then semi-annually to these contractors. Their results, which are returned to EML within 90 days, are compiled with EML`s results and are reported back to the participating contractors 30 days later. A summary of the reported results is available to the participants 2 days after the reporting deadline via a modem-telephone connection to the EML computer.
Date: July 3, 1995
Creator: Sanderson, C.G.; Greenlaw, P. & Pan, V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Intercomparison of active, passive and continuous instruments for radon and radon progeny measurements in the EML chamber and test facility

Description: The results from the May 1995 Intercomparison of Active, Passive and Continuous Instruments for Radon and Radon Progeny Measurement conducted in the EML radon exposure and test facility are presented. Represented were 13 participants that measure radon with open faced and diffusion barrier activated carbon collectors, 10 with nuclear alpha track detectors, 9 with short-term and long-term electret/ionization chambers, and 13 with active and passive commercial electronic continuous monitors. For radon progeny, there were four participants that came in person to take part in the grab sampling methodology for measuring individual radon progeny and the potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC). There were 11 participants with continuous and integrating commercial electronic instruments that are used for measuring the PAEC. The results indicate that all the tested instruments that measure radon fulfill their intended purpose. All instruments and methods used for grab sampling for radon progeny did very well. However, most of the continuous and integrating electronic instruments used for measuring the PAEC or working level appear to underestimate the potential risk from radon progeny when the concentration of particles onto which the radon progeny are attached is <5,000 cm{sup -3}.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: George, A.C.; Knutson, E.O.; Tu, K.W. & Fisenne, I.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Intercomparison of active and passive instruments for radon and radon progeny in North America

Description: An intercomparison exercise for radon and radon progeny instruments and methods was held at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) from April 22--May 2, 1994. The exercise was conducted in the new EML radon test and calibration facility in which conditions of exposure are very well controlled. The detection systems of the intercompared instruments consisted of. (1) pulse ionization chambers, (2) electret ionization chambers, (3) scintillation detectors, (4) alpha particle spectrometers with silicon diodes, surface barrier or diffused junction detectors, (5) registration of nuclear tracks in solid-state materials, and (6) activated carbon collectors counted by gamma-ray spectrometry or by alpha- and beta-liquid scintillation counting. 23 private firms, government laboratories and universities participated with a 165 passive integrating devices consisting of: Activated carbon collectors, nuclear alpha track detectors and electret ionization chambers, and 11 active and passive continuous radon monitors. Five portable integrating and continuous instruments were intercompared for radon progeny. Forty grab samples for radon progeny were taken by five groups that participated in person to test and evaluate their primary instruments and methods that measure individual radon progeny and the potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) in indoor air. Results indicate that more than 80% of the measurements for radon performed with a variety of instruments, are within {plus_minus}10% of actual value. The majority of the instruments that measure individual radon progeny and the PAEC gave results that are in good agreement with the EML reference value. Radon progeny measurements made with continuous and integrating instruments are satisfactory with room for improvement.
Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: George, A.C.; Tu, Keng-Wu & Knutson, E.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of selected modern filter media for use in radon/thoron progeny measurements

Description: We tested a number of air sampling filters to determine their suitability for use in radon/thoron progeny measurements. The main test consisted of sampling a radon progeny atmosphere, then measuring the energy spectrum of the alpha particles emerging from the face of the filter. It was found that Millipore AA, long a favorite for this application, is still a good choice. However, this filter is prone to developing electrostatic charge, which can cause the additional collection of {sup 218}Po during filter handling. Metricel DM-800 is also a good choice, and it is less prone to charging. 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.
Date: April 1, 1996
Creator: Knutson, E.O. & Seo, Kyung-Won
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The April 1994 and October 1994 radon intercomparisons at EML

Description: Quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) are the backbone of many commercial and research processes and programs. QA/QC research tests the state of a functioning system, be it the production of manufactured goods or the ability to make accurate and precise measurements. The quality of the radon measurements in the US have been tested under controlled conditions in semi-annual radon gas intercomparison exercises sponsored by the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) since 1981. The two Calendar Year 1994 radon gas intercomparison exercises were conducted in the EML exposure chamber. Thirty-two groups including US Federal facilities, USDOE contractors, national and state laboratories, universities and foreign institutions participated in these exercises. The majority of the participant`s results were within {+-}10% of the EML value at radon concentrations of 570 and 945 Bq m{sup {minus}3}.
Date: October 1, 1995
Creator: Fisenne, I.M.; George, A.C.; Perry, P.M. & Keller, H.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Long-term TLD measurements of environmental background radiation in the New York City Area

Description: The results of month-long TLD measurements at seven locations within 150 km of New York City are reported for 12 years at a few locations and for up to 18 years at others. At some locations, multiple dosimeters were deployed to acquire concurrent indoor and outdoor measurements. The sites were varied and include an urban high-rise residence, three suburban backyards, a rural hillside, and the wooded outskirts of a nuclear power plant (nonoperational). Long-term mean dose rates in air ranged from 50.8 to 123.1 nGy h{sup {minus}1} (5.8 to 14.1 {mu}R h{sup {minus}1}) across the area. The typical seasonal dose rate in air variations are presented for two of the sites and are briefly discussed in terms of soil conditions. The data indicate that it is possible to achieve monthly variations from the long-term mean as high as 20 to 40%. One of these locations was monitored for indoor (2 floors) and outdoor air dose rates. This allowed for a time series comparison to be performed illustrating the changing contribution of terrestrial radiation to the total dose rate relative to the steady building material-derived radioactivity. This site also permitted the calculation of indoor/outdoor ratios for two floors. Another suburban location yielded an indoor/outdoor ratio using ground floor dose-rate-in-air measurements. Also presented are mean annual dose rates in air showing a long-term decrease at some locations. A statistical Kendall test was performed to quantify the magnitude of the decrease. A definitive explanation of this trend requires further study.
Date: November 1, 1994
Creator: Maiello, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In situ gamma-ray spectrometry: A tutorial for environmental radiation scientists

Description: This tutorial is intended for those in the environmental field who perform assessments in areas where there is radioactive contamination in the surface soil. Techniques will be introduced for performing on-site quantitative measurements of gamma radiation in the environment using high resolution germanium detectors. A basic understanding of ionizing radiation principles is assumed; however, a detailed knowledge of gamma spectrometry systems is not required. Emphasized is the practical end of operations in the field and the conversion of measured full absorption peak count rates in a collected spectrum to meaningful radiological quantities, such as the concentration of a radionuclide in the soil, activity per unit area, and dose rate in the air. The theory of operation and calibration procedures will be covered in detail to provide the necessary knowledge to adapt the technique to site-specific problems. Example calculations for detector calibration are also provided.
Date: October 1, 1993
Creator: Miller, K. M. & Shebell, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Low power, constant-flow air pump systems

Description: A rugged, yet small and lightweight constant-flow air pump system has been designed. Flow control is achieved using a novel approach which is three times more power efficient than previous designs. The resultant savings in battery size and weight makes these pumps ideal for sampling air on balloon platforms. The pump package includes meteorological sensors and an onboard computer that stores time and sensor data and turns the constant-flow pump circuit on/off. Some applications of these systems are also presented in this report.
Date: January 1, 1994
Creator: Polito, M. D. & Albert, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Semi-annual report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program

Description: This report presents the results from the analysis of the 44th set of environmental quality assessment samples (QAP XLIV) that were received on or before June 3, 1996. The QAP is designed to test the quality of environmental measurements being reported to the Department of Energy by it`s contractors. Since 1976, samples have been prepared and analyzed by the Environmental measurements Laboratory.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Sanderson, C.G. & Greenlaw, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department