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Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio

Description: This research project is aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS). The experimental sites, owned and maintained by the American Electrical Power, are located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites, characterized by age chronosequences, were reclaimed with and without topsoil application and are under continuous grass or forest cover. Among the three sites chosen for this study one was reclaimed in 1978 (Cumberland), one in 1987 (Switch Grass) and one site was reclaimed in 1994 (Tilton's Run). All three sites were reclaimed with topsoil application and were under continuous grass cover. Eighteen experimental plots were developed on each site. Five fertilization treatments were applied in triplicate on each experimental site. During this quarter, water infiltration tests were performed on the soil surface in the experimental plots. Soil samples were analyzed for soil moisture characteristics. This report presents the data on infiltration rates, volume of transport and storage pores, and available water capacity (AWC) of soil. The infiltration rates after 5 min (i{sub 5}) showed high statistical variability (CV > 0.62) among the three sites. Both steady state infiltration rate and cumulative infiltration showed moderate to high variability (CV > 0.35). The mean values for the infiltration rate after 5 min, steady state infiltration rate, and cumulative infiltration were higher for Switch Grass (2.93 {+-} 2.05 cm min{sup -1}; 0.63 {+-} 0.34 cm min{sup -1}; 113.07 {+-} 39.37 cm) than for Tilton's Run (1.76 {+-} 1.42 cm min{sup -1}; 0.40 {+-} 0.18 cm min{sup -1}; 73.68 {+-} 25.94 cm), and lowest for Cumberland (0.63 {+-} 0.34 cm min{sup -1}; 0.27 {+-} 0.19 cm min{sup -1}; 57.89 {+-} 31.00 cm). The AWC for 0-15 cm soil was highest at Tilton's Run (4.21 {+-} 1.75 cm) followed by Cumberland (3.83 {+-} ...
Date: October 1, 2005
Creator: Shukla, M.K.; Lorenz, K. & Lal, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio

Description: This research project is aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS). The experimental sites were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoil and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites are owned and maintained by Americal Electrical Power. These sites were reclaimed (1) with topsoil application, and (2) without topsoil application, and were under continuous grass or forest cover. Three core and three bulk soil samples were collected from each of the experimental site and one unmined site (UMS) for 0-15 cm and 15-30 cm depths and soil bulk density ({rho}{sub b}), texture, saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), volumes of transport (VTP) and storage (VSP) pores, available water capacity (AWC), pH and electrical conductivity (EC), SOC, total nitrogen (TN) concentrations and stocks were determined. The preliminary results from sites reclaimed with topsoil and grass indicate that sand content was highest (24%) and clay content was lowest (17%) for site reclaimed in 2003 (R03) for 0-15 cm depth. The {rho}{sub b} was highest for R03 (1.24 Mg m{sup -3}) than sites reclaimed in 1987 (R87; 1.02 Mg m{sup -3}), 1978 (R78; 0.98 Mg m{sup -3}) and UMS (0.96 Mg m{sup -3}) for 0-15 cm depth. No significant differences were observed in Ks, VTP, VSP, AWC among these sites (P<0.05). For 15-30 cm depth {rho}{sub b} varied in the order R03 (1.61 Mg m{sup -3})> R87 (1.42 Mg m{sup -3}) = R78 (1.40 Mg m{sup -3}) = UMS (1.34 Mg m{sup -3}). Soil pH was > 5.5 and EC < 4 dS m{sup -1} for all sites and depths and was favorable for grass growth. The SOC and TN stocks were lower in R03 (3.5 Mg ha{sup -1} and 0.6 Mg ha{sup -1}; respectively) than R78 (30.1 Mg ha{sup ...
Date: April 1, 2004
Creator: Shukla, M.K. & Lal, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio

Description: Assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS) is important for preserving environmental quality and increasing agronomic yields. The mechanism of physical SOC sequestration is achieved by encapsulation of SOC in spaces within macro and microaggregates. The experimental sites, owned and maintained by American Electrical Power, were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoils and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites were reclaimed both with and without topsoil application, and were under continuous grass or forest cover. In this report results are presented from the sites reclaimed in 1994 (R94-F), in 1987 (R87-G), in 1982 (R82-F), in 1978 (R78-G), in 1969 (R69-F), in1956 (R56-G), and from the unmined control (UMS-G). Three sites are under continuous grass cover and three under forest cover since reclamation. The samples were air dried and fractionated using a wet sieving technique into macro (> 2.0 mm), meso (0.25-2.0 mm) and microaggregates (0.053-0.25 mm). The soil C and N concentrations were determined by the dry combustion method on these aggregate fractions. Soil C and N concentrations were higher at the forest sites compared to the grass sites in each aggregate fraction for both depths. Statistical analyses indicated that the number of random samples taken was probably not sufficient to properly consider distribution of SOC and TN concentrations in aggregate size fractions for both depths at each site. Erosional effects on SOC and TN concentrations were, however, small. With increasing time since reclamation, SOC and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations also increased. The higher C and N concentrations in each aggregate size fraction in older than the newly reclaimed sites demonstrated the C sink capacity of newer sites.
Date: January 1, 2006
Creator: Shukla, M.K.; Lorenz, K. & Lal, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio

Description: Assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS) is important for preserving environmental quality and increasing agronomic yields. The experimental sites were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoil and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites are owned and maintained by Americal Electrical Power. These sites were reclaimed (1) with topsoil application, and (2) without topsoil application, and were under continuous grass or forest cover. In this report results are presented from the sites reclaimed without topsoil application between 1956 and 1969. Three sites are under continuous grass cover and the three under forest cover since reclamation. Three core and three bulk soil samples were collected from each site from three slope positions (upper; middle, and lower) for 0-15 cm and 15-30 cm depths, and texture, pH and electrical conductivity (EC), soil bulk density ({rho}{sub b}), SOC, total nitrogen (TN) stocks were determined. No differences in sand and clay contents, bulk density, SOC and TN stocks were observed within different slope positions within each site. However, sand [R56-G (17.1%) < R69-G (29.1%) = R62-G (29.1%)], and silt [R56-G (58.3%) > R69-G (47.7%)] contents, bulk density [R62-G (1.25 Mg ha{sup -1}) > R69-G (0.94 Mg ha{sup -1}) = R62-G (0.90 Mg ha{sup -1})] varied significantly on the upper slope position among sites under continuous grass cover. Smaller but significant differences were also observed for pH [R69-G (8.3) > R56-G (7.7) = R62-G (7.9)] and EC [R56-G (0.66 dS m{sup -1}) > R62-G (0.25 dS m{sup -1}) = R69-G (0.24 dS m{sup -1})] on upper slope positions among sites under grass. Comparing all sites stochastically, sand and clay contents were similar among all sites except R62-F for both depths. Similarly, soil bulk density was also similar among all sites except ...
Date: January 1, 2005
Creator: Shukla, M.K. & Lal, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessing Fossil and New Carbon in Reclaimed Mined Soils

Description: Soil organic carbon (SOC) pool in the reclaimed minesoils (RMS) is the mixture of coal C originating from mining and reclamation activities and recent plant-derived organic carbon (OC). Accurate estimates of OC pools and sequestration rates in the RMS are limited by lack of standard and cost-effective method for determination of coal-C concentration. The main objective of this project was to develop and test analytical procedures for quantifying pool sizes of coal-derived C in RMS and to partition organic C in RMS into coal-derived and newly deposited SOC fractions. Analysis of soil and coal artificial mixtures indicated that the {Delta}{sup 13}C method developed was very effective in estimating coal C added in the mixtures, especially soils under C4 plants. However, most of the reclaimed sites in Ohio are under C3 plants with range of {Delta}{sup 13}C signal falling within ranges of coal. The wide range of {Delta}{sup 13}C signal observed in minesoils, (i.e. -26 to -30 for plants and -23 to -26 for coal) limits the ability of this approach to be used for southeast Ohio minesoils. This method is applicable for reclaimed prime farm land under long term corn or corn soybean rotation. Chemi-thermal method was very effective in quantifying coal-C fraction in both soil-coal artificial mixtures and minesoils. The recovery of coal-C from the mixture ranged from 93 to 100% of coal. Cross-validation of chemi-thermal method with radiocarbon analysis revealed that chemi-thermal method was as effective as radiocarbon analysis in quantifying coal-C in RMS. Coal C determined after chemi-thermal treatment of samples was highly correlated with coal C concentration calculated by radiocarbon activity (r{sup 2} = 0.95, P < 0.01). Therefore, both radiocarbon activity and chemi-thermal method were effective in estimating coal carbon concentration in reclaimed minesoils of southeast Ohio. Overall, both coal-C and recent OC fraction exhibited ...
Date: September 30, 2008
Creator: Lal, Rattan & Ussiri, David
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Unimolecular reaction dynamics of free radicals

Description: Free radical reactions are of crucial importance in combustion and in atmospheric chemistry. Reliable theoretical models for predicting the rates and products of these reactions are required for modeling combustion and atmospheric chemistry systems. Unimolecular reactions frequently play a crucial role in determining final products. The dissociations of vinyl, CH2= CH, and methoxy, CH3O, have low barriers, about 13,000 cm-1 and 8,000 cm-1, respectively. Since barriers of this magnitude are typical of free radicals these molecules should serve as benchmarks for this important class of reactions. To achieve this goal, a detailed understanding of the vinyl and methoxy radicals is required. Results for dissociation dynamics of vinyl and selectively deuterated vinyl radical are reported. Significantly, H-atom scrambling is shown not to occur in this reaction. A large number of spectroscopic experiments for CH3O and CHD2O have been performed. Spectra recorded include laser induced fluorescence (LIF), laser excited dispersed fluorescence (LEDF), fluorescence dip infrared (FDIR) and stimulated emission pumping (SEP). Such results are critical for implementing dynamics experiments involving the dissociation of methoxy.
Date: September 1, 2006
Creator: Miller, Terry A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The ecology and genomics of C02 fixation in oceanic river plumes

Description: The ocean/atmosphere interface is the major conduit for the entry of atmospheric CO2 into oceanic carbon pools that can lead to sequestration or recycled release. The surface layers of the temperate and tropical oceans are often too oligotrophic to result in significant primary production that might lead to carbon sequestration. However, nutrient-rich river plumes can alter the primary production schemes of oligotrophic ocean basins, resulting in increased phytoplankton biomass and carbon fixation. The ultimate goal of this proposal is to understand these carbon cycling processes in major river plumes from the molecular processes involved in biological DIC uptake to contribution to basin-wide production and potential sequestration. Our research efforts include a field component to answer the questions raised concerning DIC in plumes entering ocean basins and an intensive genomics approach to understanding these processes on the cellular level using genomic fragments obtained from plume biota. This project is actually composed of 3 separate PI-initiated projects, including projects at the University of South Florida (USF) College of Marine Science, the University of Puerto Rico, and The Ohio State University. This report concerns research conducted at The Ohio State University and studies performed in collaboration with USF. In order to understand what might occur in the field, two model sysytems were studied in the laboratory. Carbon fixation in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp Strain PCC 7002 took place mainly through the CBB pathway. Nitrogen nutrition in cyanobacteria is regulated by NtcA, a transcriptional regulatory protein. We show that the rubisco activity and gene (rbcL) expression were not affected when cells were exposed to prolonged periods of nitrogen stress, however cells appear to use intracellular nitrogen reserves during nitrogen starvation. Transcripts of the global transcriptional regulator NtcA are expressed under nitrogen starved and nitrogen replete (nitrate or ammonia) growth conditions, with slight decrease ...
Date: September 12, 2008
Creator: Tabita, F. Robert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

Description: At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein, designated TFE, that had sequences in common with the eukaryotic general transcription factor TFIIE, stimulated archaeal transcription initiation and that ...
Date: September 9, 2009
Creator: Reeve, John N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamonds for Detector Applications

Description: Diamond was studied as a possible radiation hard technology for use in future high radiation environments. With the commissioning of the LHC expected in 2009, and the LHC upgrades expected in 2013, all LHC experiments are planning for detector upgrades which require radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond has now been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle and CDF and is installed in all LHC experiments. As a result, this material is now being discussed as an alternative sensor material for tracking very close to the interaction region of the super-LHC where the most extreme radiation conditions will exist. Our work addressed the further development of the new material, single-crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond, towards reliable industrial production of large pieces and new geometries needed for detector applications.
Date: March 31, 2009
Creator: Kagan, Harris; Gan, K.K. & Kass, Richard
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Semi-passive, Chemical Oxidation Schemes for the Long-term Treatment of Contaminants

Description: This research involves a combined experimental and modeling study that builds on our previous DOE-sponsored work in investigating how KMnO{sub 4} can be better used with in situ remediation of groundwater contaminated by chlorinated ethylenes (e.g., PCE, TCE, DCE). This study aims to provide scientific basis for developing a new long-term, semi-passive ISCO scheme that uses controlled release KMnO{sub 4} as a reactive barrier component. Specific objectives of the study are (1) to construct controlled release KMnO{sub 4} as a new reactive barrier component that could deliver permanganate at a controlled rate over long time periods of years, (2) to quantitatively describe release mechanisms associated with the controlled release KMnO{sub 4}, (3) to demonstrate efficacy of the new remediation scheme using proof-of-concept experiments, and (4) to design advanced forms of controlled release systems through numerical optimization. The new scheme operates in a long-term, semi-passive manner to control spreading of a dissolved contaminant plume with periodic replacement of the controlled release KMnO{sub 4} installed in the subsurface. As a first step in developing this remedial concept, we manufactured various prototype controlled release KMnO{sub 4} forms. Then we demonstrated using column experiments that the controlled release KMnO{sub 4} could deliver small amount of permanganate into flowing water at controlled rates over long time periods of years. An analytical model was also used to estimate the diffusivities and durations of the controlled release KMnO{sub 4}. Finally, proof-of-concept flow-tank experiments were performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the controlled release KMnO{sub 4} scheme in controlling dissolved TCE plume in a long-term, semi-passive manner. Another important thrust of our research effort involved numerical optimization of controlled release systems. This study used a numerical model that is capable of describing release patterns of active agent from controlled release systems of varied forms and applications. We manufactured ...
Date: December 13, 2005
Creator: Schwartz, Frank W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Molten Metal Treatment by Salt Fluxing with Low Environmental Emissions

Description: Abstract: Chlorine gas is traditionally used for fluxing of aluminum melt for removal of alkali and alkaline earth elements. However this results in undesirable emissions of particulate matter and gases such as HCl and chlorine, which are often at unacceptable levels. Additionally, chlorine gas is highly toxic and its handling, storage, and use pose risks to employees and the local community. Holding of even minimal amounts of chlorine necessitates extensive training for all plant employees. Fugitive emissions from chlorine usage within the plant cause accelerated corrosion of plant equipment. The Secondary Aluminum Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) under the Clean Air Act, finalized in March 2000 has set very tough new limits on particulate matter (PM) and total hydrogen chloride emissions from aluminum melting and holding furnaces. These limits are 0.4 and 0.1 lbs per ton of aluminum for hydrogen chloride and particulate emissions, respectively. Assuming new technologies for meeting these limits can be found, additional requirements under the Clean Air Act (Prevention of Significant Deterioration and New Source Review) trigger Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for new sources with annual emissions (net emissions not expressed per ton of production) over specified amounts. BACT currently is lime coated bag-houses for control of particulate and HCl emissions. These controls are expensive, difficult to operate and maintain, and result in reduced American competitiveness in the global economy. Solid salt fluxing is emerging as a viable option for the replacement of chlorine gas fluxing, provided emissions can be consistently maintained below the required levels. This project was a cooperative effort between the Ohio State University and Alcoa to investigate and optimize the effects of solid chloride flux addition in molten metal for alkali impurity and non-metallic inclusion removal minimizing dust and toxic emissions and maximizing energy conservation. In this program, the salt metal ...
Date: July 31, 2007
Creator: Sahai, Yogeshwar
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Accelerator Neutron Source for BNCT

Description: The overall goal of this project was to develop an accelerator-based neutron source (ABNS) for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Specifically, our goals were to design, and confirm by measurement, a target assembly and a moderator assembly that would fulfill the design requirements of the ABNS. These design requirements were 1) that the neutron field quality be as good as the neutron field quality for the reactor-based neutron sources for BNCT, 2) that the patient treatment time be reasonable, 3) that the proton current required to treat patients in reasonable times be technologially achievable at reasonable cost with good reliability, and accelerator space requirements which can be met in a hospital, and finally 4) that the treatment be safe for the patients.
Date: March 14, 2006
Creator: Blue, Thomas, E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of a Novel Non-Consumable Anode for Electrowinning Primary Aluminum

Description: The principal goal of the project was to determine through theoretical considerations and from chemical and electrochemical laboratory studies the technical and economic feasibility for the substitution and retrofitting of an SOFC-type anode for today's carbon anode in a cell for electrowinning primary Al. However, solubility measurements showed that no value of cryolite ratio can exist where the solubilities of the solid electrolyte components (zirconia and especially yttria) would be small relative to the alumina solubility. Therefore, the utilization of the proposed SOFC-type anode cannot be realized for any cell involving a cryolite-base solvent. However, the project suggested that the SOFC-type anode scheme might be successful if the solvent/electrolyte for electrowinning Al could be changed to a fused sulfate melt. During the solubility experiments, electrochemical probes were developed, and a bath characterization was defined, to measure quantitatively the acid-base character of cryolite melts. The measured acid-base behavior was then used to correlate the alumina solubility in cryolite over a wide range of cryolite ratio at 1300K. A mathematical modeling of the alumina solubility as a function of basicity identified three solutes of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in cryolite-base melts: Na{sub 2}Al{sub 2}OF{sub 6}, Na{sub 2}Al{sub 2}O{sub 2}F{sub 4}, and Na{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 2}F{sub 6} as acidic, neutral and basic solutes, respectively. For the first time, the stereochemistry (geometries) of these complex solutes was clarified. For the non-oxygen containing Al-F complex anions, Na{sub 3}AlF{sub 6} and NaAlF{sub 4} were also considered as solutes, and some NaF (but no AlF{sub 3}) could remain in the melts. The previously suggested solute Na{sub 2}AlF{sub 5} was found to be unstable. The strong complexing in the cryolite/alumina system means that the bath is highly buffered so that a significant shift in basicity is not possible and therefore the alumina solubility does not vary greatly. The maximum ...
Date: December 4, 2003
Creator: Rapp, Robert A. & Zhang, Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN RECLAIMED MINED SOILS OF OHIO

Description: Assessment of soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS) is important for preserving environmental quality and increasing agronomic yields. The mechanism of physical SOC sequestration is achieved by encapsulation of SOM in spaces within macro and microaggregates. The experimental sites, owned and maintained by American Electrical Power, were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of reclaimed minesoils and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. These sites were reclaimed both with and without topsoil application, and were under continuous grass or forest cover. In this report results are presented from the sites reclaimed in 2003 (R03-G), in 1973 (R73-F), in 1969 (R69-G), in 1962 (R62-G and R62-F) and in 1957 (R57-F). Three sites are under continuous grass cover and the three under forest cover since reclamation. Three bulk soil samples were collected from each site from three landscape positions (upper; middle, and lower) for 0-15 and 15-30 cm depths. The samples were air dried and using wet sieving technique were fractionated into macro (> 2mm), meso (2-0.25 mm) and microaggregate (0.25-0.053 mm). These fractions were weighted separately and water stable aggregation (WSA) and geometric mean (GMD) and mean weight (MWD) diameters of aggregates were obtained. The soil C and N concentrations were also determined on these aggregate fractions. Analysis of mean values showed that in general, WSA and MWD of aggregates increased with increasing duration since reclamation or age of reclaimed soil for all three landscape positions and two depths in sites under continuous grass. The forest sites were relatively older than grass sites and therefore WSA or MWD of aggregates did not show any increases with age since reclamation. The lower WSA in R57-F site than R73-F clearly showed the effect of soil erosion on aggregate stability. Higher aggregation and aggregate diameters in ...
Date: April 1, 2005
Creator: Shukla, M.K. & Lal, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summer Workshop: Molecular Basis, Physiology and Diversity of Microbial Adaptation

Description: This summer workshop successfully exposed beginning graduate students, research technicians from industry, and other scientists to modern concepts and experimental protocols in an area that both DOE and NSF perceived to be lacking in U.S. science. 70 students participated in this workshop over 5 summers. Each summer, 12-16 students spent 2-4 weeks at The Ohio State University covering four distinct modules through lectures, laboratory sessions, and interaction with internationally recognized eminent scientists.
Date: May 7, 2002
Creator: Tabita, F. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Contaminant Organic Complexes: Their Structure and Energetics in Surface Decontamination

Description: The Department of Energy has a goal of decontaminating an estimated 180,000 metric tons of metal wastes in various surplus facilities. Uranium (U) and other radioactive actinides and lanthanides are embedded within the mixed oxide structures of the passivity layers of corroded iron and steel. These toxic metals can be dissolved out of the surface layers by a naturally occurring bacterial siderophore called Desferrioxamine B (DFB). DFB is a trihydroxamate ligand with one amine and three hydroxamate groups, which chelates with metals through hydroxamate coordination. Complexation of DFB with U can be utilized in decontamination strategy of the passivity layers. Therefore, we have been studying reactions of uranyl U(VI) with zerovalent iron (Fe0) followed by dissolution by DFB. The objectives were to determine the structure and speciation of solution and solid phases of U and to assess the effectiveness of DVB in U dissolution.
Date: July 12, 2005
Creator: Traina, Samuel & Sharma, Shankar
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Electronic Structure of Heavy Element Complexes

Description: The area of study is the bonding in heavy element complexes, and the application of more sophisticated electronic structure theories. Progress is recounted in several areas: (a) technological advances and current methodologies - Relativistic effects are extremely important in gaining an understanding of the electronic structure of compounds of the actinides, transactinides, and other heavy elements. Therefore, a major part of the continual benchmarking was the proper inclusion of the appropriate relativistic effects for the properties under study. (b) specific applications - These include organoactinide sandwich complexes, CO activation by actinide atoms, and theoretical studies of molecules of the transactinide elements. Finally, specific directions in proposed research are described.
Date: July 25, 2000
Creator: Bursten, Bruce E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department